I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōrākei Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 16 May 2024

3.00pm

St Chads Church and Community Centre
38 St Johns Road
Meadowbank

 

Ōrākei Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Scott Milne, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Sarah Powrie

 

Members

Troy Churton

 

 

Penny Tucker

 

 

Margaret Voice

 

 

David Wong, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Monique Rousseau

Democracy Advisor

 

13 May 2024

 

Contact Telephone: 027 203 2107

Email: monique.rousseau@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 

 

Apologies

 

Member

Angus McPhee

 


 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                  4

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                   4

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                                               4

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes              4

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                      4

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                              4

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                       4

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations           4

8.1     Deputation - Ngā Tamariki Puāwai ō Tāmaki | Auckland Kindergarten Association                                                  4

8.2     Deputation - The Dust Palace Charitable Trust                                                              5

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                6

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business     6

11        Remuera Library temporary relocation during seismic strengthening project                            7

12        Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grants for 2024/2025          13

13        Ōrākei Local Grant Round Two 2023/2024 grant allocations                                                 33

14        Ōrākei Local Board Grants Programme 2024/2025                                                           149

15        Auckland Council's Performance Report: Ōrākei Local Board for quarter three 2023/2024                                                                            161

16        Local government elections 2025 – order of names on voting documents                           205

17        Local board appointment to Emergency Readiness and Response Forum                    223

18        Amendment to the 2022-2025 Ōrākei Local Board meeting schedule                                  231

19        Ōrākei Local Board Workshop Records        235

20        Governance Forward Work Calendar and Resolutions Pending Action Report               241

21        Chairperson and Board Members' Report     247

22        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

23        Te Mōtini ā-Tukanga hei Kaupare i te Marea | Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                             293

C1       Ōrākei Local Board feedback on Pools and Leisure Contract Model                                    293

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

Chairperson S Milne will welcome those present with a karakia.

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

An apology from Member A McPhee has been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)          whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 18 April 2024, and the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 2 May 2024, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōrākei Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Ngā Tamariki Puāwai ō Tāmaki | Auckland Kindergarten Association

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for individuals and groups to deliver a presentation to the board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Pauline Winter, CEO, and Toni Nealie, General Manager Strategy, will be in attendance presenting on the opportunities and challenges faced by Auckland Kindergarten Association.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation on the opportunities and challenges faced by Auckland Kindergarten Association and thank Pauline Winter and Toni Nealie for their attendance.

Attachments

a          16 May 2024, Ōrākei Local Board, Item 8.1, Deputation - Ngā Tamariki Puāwai ō Tāmaki | Auckland Kindergarten Association - Presentation................. 297

b          16 May 2024, Ōrākei Local Board, Item 8.1, Deputation - Ngā Tamariki Puāwai ō Tāmaki | Auckland Kindergarten Association - Info Sheet..................... 307

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - The Dust Palace Charitable Trust

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for individuals and groups to deliver a presentation to the board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Rachael Dubois, Producer, and Geoff Gilson, Executive Director, will be in attendance presenting on a proposal for a mutually beneficial partnership for The Dust Palace to become an in-house company at Ellerslie War Memorial Community Centre.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation on a proposal for a mutually beneficial partnership for The Dust Palace to become an in-house company at Ellerslie War Memorial Community Centre and thank Rachael Dubois and Geoff Gilson for their attendance.

 

Attachments

a          16 May 2024, Ōrākei Local Board, Item 8.2, Deputation - The Dust Palace Charitable Trust - Presentation.......... 309

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Remuera Library temporary relocation during seismic strengthening project

File No.: CP2024/05697

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Ōrākei Local Board on the next steps for the Remuera Library relocation to Somervell Memorial Presbyterian Church during the Seismic Strengthening Project.  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Remuera Library provides a popular service to the local community and is a well utilised and cherished heritage building.

3.       The building has been identified as earthquake-prone following a Detailed Seismic Assessment in 2017 and subsequent revision in 2020.

4.       Remediation of the building has been included in the financial year 2024/2025 seismic programme.

5.       After initial discussion with the local board there is a desire to maintain a local library service during the approximately 12-month duration of the seismic strengthening and refurbishment work.

6.       Staff have considered options and recommend the local board enter in to a 12-month lease with Somervell Memorial Presbyterian Church to support this service.

7.       The proposed lease commencement date of 1 July 2024 will allow for access from 10 June 2024 for associated fit out works, with service resuming at the new venue by 15 July.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve entering into a lease with Somervell Memorial Presbyterian Church at 497 Remuera Road, Remuera for a 12-month term commencing on 1 July 2024 at a cost of at $100,000 gross lease (includes operational costs such as building warrant of fitness, building insurance and rates but excluding utilities) to provide a local library service during the period of seismic strengthening and refurbishment at Remuera Library

b)      whakaae / approve the reallocation of $40,437 from the local board’s 2023/2024 work programme line item 3844 Meadowbank Community Centre to the Somervell Church in advance of the lease commencement

c)       tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that $39,563 from the local board’s 2024/2025 work programme line item 4353 Remuera pop up will need to be allocated

d)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that there will be a contribution towards the lease of $20,000 from the Regional Seismic Strengthening work programme 2024/2025

e)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that library services are expected to commence at Somervell Memorial Presbyterian Church by 15 July 2024, with the fit out proposed to begin on 10 June 2024.  

Horopaki

Context

8.       Remuera Library is a well-used and popular local library. There were close to 15,000 visits to the library in March 2024 and visitation continues to show steady post COVID-19 recovery each quarter, helped by popular local programmes.  

9.       Remuera Library is a single-story heritage unreinforced masonry (URM) structure originally constructed in 1926, with several modifications made over the years. It has been identified as earthquake-prone, with a seismic score of 15% of the New Building Standard (15%NBS) following a Detailed Seismic Assessment in 2017 and subsequent revision in 2020. This score indicates that the library’s earthquake life-safety risk is very high compared to a new building.

10.     Owners of earthquake-prone buildings are legally obliged to mitigate seismic risk to an acceptable level within a certain timeframe.

11.     Remuera Library has been grouped amongst the buildings with highest priority for seismic strengthening due to factors including seismic vulnerability, heritage significance, and community provision.

12.     The scope of work includes strengthening the building to achieve a minimum of 67%NBS. The keys work will include strengthening the roof structure, bracing the sub-floor structure, strengthening wall-to-floor connections at the ceiling level, adding two concrete shear walls with their associated ground beam foundation, inserting cavity ties to connect brick layers in perimeter walls, enhancing existing steel parapet bracing, repairing the concrete bond beam and stitching the cracks and strengthening the Lecture Hall Entry portico. In addition to the restoration of affected areas, essential repair and maintenance, and various improvements such as fire safety enhancements, emergency lighting upgrades, accessibility enhancements, an interior cosmetic refresh to the library including paintwork and recarpeting will be carried out.

13.     The seismic construction is scheduled to begin in July 2024, with an estimated duration of 12 months. During construction the building will be closed to the public and the library service will need to be relocated.

14.     At the 28 March 2024 workshop, the local board was presented with eight potential options for the temporary relocation of the Remuera Library service. Six of these were not considered suitable due to poor access, not having the required space, or the building not being compliant. The shortlisted venues were the Somervell Memorial Presbyterian Church and Meadowbank Community Centre.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     Staff investigated the two venue options (see table 1) for the relocation of the Remuera Library service during financial year 2024/2025 and found that the Somervell Memorial Presbyterian Church better met the requirements of the temporary library service without impacting other community groups already using the Meadowbank Community Centre.

16.     Staff are recommending temporarily relocating to Somervell Memorial Presbyterian Church. Somervell Church is situated close to current location at just 700m east of the library on Remuera Road. There are good public transport links and easy street parking with some onsite parking.

17.     Staff are not recommending relocating to Meadowbank Community Centre as it is currently used as a venue for hire. Relocating to the community centre would displace the current hirers and mean a reduction in revenue from hirers of around $40,000.

18.     Furthermore, Meadowbank is far from Remuera Library and local customers who use this library the most. The space has small rooms with narrow hallways not suitable for a library. The venue would only be able to accommodate a limited service with click and collect and a small browsing section for the duration of the closure.

Table 1: Options available to retain a local library service for current customers of the Remuera Library. 

​Options  

Option A: 

Relocate service to Somervell Memorial Presbyterian - Church 

Recommended

Option B: 

Meadowbank Community Centre 

 

 

​Detail  

The local board approves the rental amount, and the library relocates to Somervell Church for approximately 12 months 

Relocating to the council-owned Meadowbank Community Centre which is currently a venue hire only facility. 

​Benefits  

·   Local service continues with Somervell Church situated close to its current location. 

·   Continuing to service the existing community with a like for like service on a slightly smaller scale. 

·   Light, inviting space

·   On good bus route 

·   Some car parking available at side and rear of building 

·   Easy on street parking 

·   Easy level access to hall entrance 

·   Adequate facilities  

·   Further spaces downstairs available to book for programmes and events as required. 

·   Assessment report completed following site visit on 15 February 2024. The church was found to be generally in good condition.  

·   Easy access from main road 

·   Some parking at front of building 

·   Located on good bus route 

·   No lease cost.

​Implications  

·   Not situated in main shopping area – customers will need to make a special trip

·   Rental cost for this facility 

·   A commercial lease is needed for the duration of the seismic work.

·   Slightly smaller space 

·   Slight gap in service during relocation.

·   Far from Remuera Library and local customers  

·   Current hirers displaced and loss of revenue (about $40,000) 

·   Small rooms, narrow hallways, open kitchen and many exit doors would make it difficult to provide a safe library space

·   Service offer would be click and collect, plus a small, limited browsing collection

·   Slight gap in service during relocation.

 

19.     At the March 2024 workshop, the local board requested staff investigate Somervell Church’s lease parameters.

20.     Eke Panuku, Auckland Council’s leasing experts, negotiated with the church and have secured the lease with agreement from all parties at $100,000 gross lease which includes operational costs such as building warrant of fitness, building insurance and rates but excluding utilities.

21.     Some minor adjustments to the building will need to be made at the expense of the church, these are to be made to the site prior to taking over the lease.

22.     Once the church has completed these adjustments, the Seismic Strengthening work programme project manager will be responsible for making the space fit for purpose from the 10 June.

23.     A site visit of the church with building assessors was conducted on 15 February 2024. All building due diligence, including fire safety, accessibility, power, security, floor capacity, and asbestos, were completed.  The assessment reports found the building to be generally in good condition.

24.     It is expected that the temporary Remuera Library at Somervell Memorial Presbyterian Church will be open to the public by 15 July. The same level of services will be made available on a slightly smaller scale.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     Completing the seismic strengthening work on Remuera Library will sustain a current heritage building for future generations. Maintaining current facilities is a more sustainable option than building a completely new facility.

26.     Local community services create a stronger sense of place and foster localism and place-based approaches. This has a positive impact on our resilience to climate change. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     Connected Communities controls the regional management of local library services.  Subject to the outcome of this decision, staff will work with Parks and Community Facilities to manage the implications for the refurbishment and relocation to ensure the continuation of service.

28.     Staff will work with Eke Panuku to ensure effective management of the lease with Somervell Memorial Presbyterian Church.  

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     The impact of losing or limiting the library services is that the local community and customers will need to travel to alternative libraries within the area.

30.     During the workshop on the 28 March 2024 there was a clear steer from the local board for staff to continue the discussion with Somervell Church and negotiate the lease as the preferred option. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-Term Plan 2021 – 2031, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework and Local Board Plans.

32.     The recommended option as discussed in this report will benefit Māori and the wider community through the provision of a quality library service. This will enable fostering of community relationships and connections.

33.     The location for the recommended option is relatively close to the Ōrākei marae, relocating the library service will ensure it continues to service the community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     The funds for the lease of the new temporary Remuera Library relocation will need to be allocated by the local board. There is currently an underspend sitting in the 2023/2024 budget in line item 3844 Meadowbank Community Centre. This underspend is due to programming not being run at this venue which is currently only being used as a venue for hire.

35.     Staff are recommending that this underspend be reallocated to be used as the first tranche payment to the church prior to the lease commencing. 

36.     Staff are recommending that the local board allocate $39,563 in the 2024/2025 work programme line item 4353: Remuera pop up towards the Church lease cost.

37.     A contribution of $20,000 from the Regional Seismic Programme Delivery 2024/2025 work programme will also be provided to cover the cost of the lease.

Table two: Funding breakdown

Budget year

Funding source

Amount

2023/2024

Underspend in line item 3844: Meadowbank Community Centre

$40,437

2024/2025

Allocation from line item 4353: Remuera pop up

$39,563

2024/2025

Regional Seismic Programme Delivery

$20,000

Total required budget

$100,000

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

​Risk

Impact

Mitigation

Project overrun 

If the seismic project is delayed the library service will require an extension to lease term which will come at additional cost. 

This will be mitigated by working with experts dedicated to the project who will actively monitor and report on progress. Taking corrective action as needed and reporting back to staff in Connected Communities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     If the local board approve the recommended option and enter into a local lease the next steps will be for Eke Panuku to liaise with the Somervell Memorial Presbyterian Church to finalise the lease.

39.     Staff will plan for relocation and closure of the Remuera Library as of 1 July 2024 working closely with the seismic project delivery team.

40.     Some minor remedial works are required to the church as well as the fit out ahead of relocating and these will be agreed upon if approval is granted.

41.     The relocation process will begin and communication to customers will be sent with updates of the closure dates, new location, and technical information for the project. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Siobhan Connelly - Connected Communities Lead & Coach

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott - Head of Community Delivery

Zigi Yates - Senior Advisor

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grants for 2024/2025

File No.: CP2024/01203

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report confirms Business Improvement District (BID) annual compliance against the Auckland Council BID Policy (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) as of 10 March 2024.

2.       The BID Policy includes a total of 23 Requirements, 19 are the direct responsibility of the Business Improvement District (BID) and inform this report.

3.       This report considers whether the local board should recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for the Ellerslie, Remuera, and St Heliers Business Improvement District (BID) programmes for the 2024/2025 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

BID-operating business associations within the local board area

4.       Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are programmes where local business and property owners have agreed to work together to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

5.       The BID Policy includes a total of 23 Requirements, 19 are the direct responsibility of the Business Improvement District (BID) and inform this report. As part of the 19 Requirements, the BIDs are required to provide annual accountability reports which are due 10 March each year.

6.       The BID annual accountability reports on public funds received by the BID within the local board area for the 2022/2023 financial year and has a direct link to council’s Long-Term Plan 2024/2025 and annual budget 2024/2025 approval process to strike the BID targeted rates for 2024/2025.

7.        Ōrākei Local Board has three BIDs operating in their local area:

Table One: shows the amount of targeted rate each BID is seeking in 2024/2025.

Incorporated Society Name

Proposed 2024/2025 Targeted Rate

Met BID Policy annual reporting requirements.

(9,11 & 18)

Ellerslie Business Association Inc

$192,000.00

ü

The Remuera Business Association Inc

$257,335.20

 

ü

St Heliers Village Association Inc

$158,770.96

 

ü

 

8.       Staff recommend that the local board approving Ellerslie, Remuera, and St Heliers BIDs to receive their targeted rate grant for 2024/2025.

Regional summary across all 51 BIDs for this reporting period

9.       Of the 51 BID-operating business associations in Tāmaki Makaurau, 92% (47 BIDs) completed the annual accountability reporting at the time of this report.

10.     36 BIDs (70.5%) increased their targeted rates between 2% to 50% for 2024/2025, while 15 BIDs maintained the fiscal status quo.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      recommends to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for inclusion in the Long-Term Plan 2024/2025 for the following Business Improvement District (BID) programmes:

i.        $ 192,000.00 for Ellerslie BID

ii.       $ 257,335.20 for Remuera BID

iii.      $ 158,770.96 for St Heliers BID

 

 

Horopaki

Context

Auckland Council Business Improvement District (BID) Policy and BID targeted rate grant agreement.

 

11.     Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2022) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) includes a total of 23 Requirements, 19 are the direct responsibility of the BID-operating business association and inform this annual report. (Attachment A).

12.     The remaining four BID Policy Requirements set out the process for establishing, expanding, and discontinuing a BID programme; and determines rating mechanisms. These will be covered within individual BID local board reports.

13.     The BID Policy does not prescribe or measure standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for business association members to determine. Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

14.     The BID Policy is supported by a BID Targeted Rate Grant Agreement, a three-year agreement signed by both Auckland Council and each BID-operating business association’s executive committee. The agreement sets out the relationship between the parties, how payment will be made and that compliance with the BID Policy is mandatory. The agreement confirms the business associations independence from Auckland Council. All 51 BIDs have signed a BID Targeted Rate Grant Agreement for period 1 December 2022 to 30 December 2025.

15.     This report updates the local board on compliance with the 19 BID Policy Requirements that are the responsibility of the Business Improvement District (BID), with a focus on the BIDs annual accountability reporting (BID Policy Requirement 9, 11 and 18) relating to public funds received by the BID for the 2022/2023 financial year.

16.     This report includes a copy of the individual BIDs Governance Summary documents, Attachment B, C and D. These documents include the full resolution detailing the amount of BID targeted rate grant approved by association members at their 2023 AGM for the 2024/2025 financial year. The Chair also agrees, by signing this document, to advise council of any perceived or real/current issues that can affect compliance with the BID Policy.

BID Programmes

17.     Local BID programmes should provide value to the collective business community by delivering a suite of economic activities that respond to local needs and opportunities and are agreed by the local business community. BID programmes also provide the opportunity to work with the council group and engage with local boards.

18.   The BID programme does not replicate services provided by the council but channels the capabilities and knowledge of the private sector to improve economic outcomes and achieve common goals.

19.   Each business association operating a BID programme sets the BID targeted rate grant amount at its Annual General Meeting (AGM) when members vote to approve a detailed income and expenditure operational budget and business plan for the following financial year.

20.   Responsibility for delivery and outcomes of the BID programme sits with the individual BID-operating business association executive committee (provision of reporting information) and members (reviewing information provided to them by the executive committee).

21.   BID-operating business associations operate as independent Incorporated Societies. All BIDs are registered incorporated societies and need to be aware of the requirement to re-register by April 2026 under the updated Incorporated Societies Act 2022. 

Orakei Local Board BID Targeted Rates 2024/2025

22.     Orakei Local Board has three BIDs operating in their local board area. Table two shows the amount of targeted rate each BID had approved at their 2023 AGM for the 2024/2025 and linked to the council’s Long-Term Plan 2024/2034 and annual budget 2024/2025 approval process.

Table Two: Amount of targeted rate for each BID in 2024/2025

Incorporated Society Name

Proposed 2024/2025 Targeted Rate

Change from previous year dollars/ percentage

Last year target rate amount was increased

Ellerslie Business Association Inc

$192,000.00

5.49%

2023

The Remuera Business Association Inc

 

$257,335.20  

3%

2023

St Heliers Village Association Inc

$158,770.96

 

6%

2022

 

Decision making

Auckland Council

23.     The recommendation in this report is put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the Long-Term Plan 2024/2025 and its striking (setting) of the targeted rates.

24.     In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, the Governing Body is authorised to make the final decisions on what BID programme targeted rates, if any, to set in any particular year or property (in terms of the amount and the geographic area to be rated).

 

Local Boards

25.     Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body if it is satisfied that the BID is sufficiently complying with the BID Policy.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Regional overview

26.     The BID Policy has been in place in Tāmaki Makaurau since 2022 and applies to 51 BIDs across the ā-rohe, up from 50 BIDs reported in the 2023 report to local boards.

27.     Across all 51 BID-operating business associations 92% (47 out of 51 BIDs) completed the annual accountability reporting at the time of this report.

28.     Annual accountability reporting is a requirement of the BID Policy (Requirement 11). This has meant the BID Team deviated from the BID Policy Requirement providing an extension to the due date to enable BIDs to achieve sufficient compliance for 2024/2025.

29.     The BID team observed this year BIDs have paid less attention to providing the required annual accountability documents by the 10 March 2024 due date, compared with the previous year.

Summary of BIDs meeting BID Policy Requirements

30.     51% (26) of BIDs successfully completed their annual accountability reporting by the due date of 10 March 2024.

31.     41% (21) received notification that they had missing information or documents and were provided an extension to the 10 March deadline. 

32.     4 BIDs failed to meet BID Policy Requirement 11 and the 10 March deadline and the provided extension to this deadline.

33.     BID targeted rate grants 2024/2025 - 36 increased their targeted rates between 2% to 50% for 2024/2025, while 15 maintained the fiscal status quo.

34.     Of the 11 BIDs with income under $120,000 (BID Policy Requirement 4), two BIDs now met this requirement as of 10 March 2024.

35.     Of the remaining nine BIDs, three have made no comment to increase their income. Five BIDs have increased their BID Targeted rate grant and are on track to meet this requirement by 1 July 2028 and one has indicated interest in a BID expansion project.

Regional BID Programme Growth

36.     This section provides an overview of BID programme growth across the region.

37.     Onehunga BID achieved a successful expansion ballot in February 2024. This will see them evolve from a retail focused BID into a BID encompassing retail, plus commercial and industrial areas, with a significant growth in target rate commencing 1 July 2024.

38.     Kingsland BID has confirmed at their 2023 AGM they would implement a BID expansion project in 2024/2025.

39.     Grey Lynn Business Association will be holding a ballot later this year towards establishing as a new BID from 1 July 2025.

40.     Takanini Business Association is on track to progress their BID establishment project aiming to become a new BID from 1 July 2026

 

 

BID Team: 2024 Accountability Reporting process overview.

41.     Upon receipt of individual BID annual accountability documents, staff follow a set process that includes:

·    Reviewing the accountability reporting of the previous accountability period (10 March 2023) to understand if any recommendations or feedback had been made.

·    Review the documents provided for 10 March 2024.

·    Discussion regarding observations relevant to that BID (knowledge, actions taken etc.)

·    Communicate to BID (information missing, more information required, completion of reporting).

42.     Generic observations from year 10 March 2024 accountability include:

·    Acceptance that limited local board discretionary funding was available which led to BIDS having a greater focus on efficiencies in their own BID budgets.

·    The improving quality of annual discussions between local boards and BID-operating business associations. Less emphasis on operational aspects and more discussion on how they could collaborate.

BID Policy – Requirements 9, 11 and 18

43.     Requirements 9 and 18 of the BID Policy are focused on BID affiliates having access to BID programme information and the BID targeted rate spend. It specifies a range of information BIDs must ensure are easily and freely accessible on a suitable online platform.

44.     This year a one-off ‘Website Check List’ was added to the annual accountablity reporting.  This document confirms complance against BID Policy, Requirements 9 and 18 relating to the transparency of BID information on a public platform.

45.     The BID Policy, requirement 11 sets out the documents that form the annual accountability reporting documents for each BID. These documents confirm membership decision-making has taken place regarding the BID programme at the 2023 AGM.

46.     Other reporting requirements such as the filing of annual financial statements with the Companies Office under the Incorporated Societies Act are included in this reporting.

Orakei Local Board BIDs

47.     The table below sets out the documents required by 10 March 2024 under BID Policy Requirement 11.

Table Three: Business associations compliance with the BID Policy Requirement 11, 9 and 18.

BID Policy Requirement 11

 

Business Associations – documents submitted

Ellerslie Business Association Inc

The Remuera Business Association Inc

 

St Heliers Village Association Inc

Statement of financial/ performance reporting 2022/2023

ü

ü

ü

Audited report/review 2022/2023

ü

ü

ü

Audit Management Letter 2022/2023

ü

ü

ü

Chairs report (written) 2022/2023

ü

ü

ü

Treasurers report (written) 2022/2023

ü

ü

ü

Manager’s report (written) 2022/2023

ü

ü

ü

Approved business plan for 18 months 2024/2025

ü

ü

ü

Income and expenditure budget 2024/2025

ü

ü

ü

Draft Minutes 2023 AGM

ü

ü

ü

Financial/Audit reports posted to Companies Office website

ü

ü

ü

Mandatory Management Summary – signed by manager

ü

ü

ü

Mandatory Governance Summary – signed by Chair

ü

ü

ü

Strategic Plan *

2024-2029

2020-2025

2023-2026

Website Check List

ü

ü

ü

 Note: * Current strategic 3–5-year plans to be available upon request.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table Four: Business associations compliance with other BID Policy Requirements.

Business Associations

 

 

BID Policy requirement

Ellerslie Business Association

Remuera  Business Association

St Heliers Business Association

Requirement 3: Increase BID income to $120,000 by 1 July 2028

N/A

N/A

N/A

Requirement 10: Other Council Funding – accountability reporting* Baseline to be established year ending 2025

N/A

N/A

N/A

Requirement 12: Clear separation between BID governance and management Measure- BID Team advised of issue within BID. Year ending 10 March 2024

Nil

Nil

Nil

Note – BID Policy Requirement 10: * Funding agreements between the BID and local board (or any other part of council) set out the contractual obligations for funds received. These other funds are in addition to the BID targeted rate funding and are not covered in this report.

Orakei Local Board: observations on BID Operating business associations within the area

·    Ellerslie – nothing noted.

·    Remuera  – nothing noted

·    St Heliers – nothing noted

48.     Using the documents and information submitted, the BID Team is satisfied that Ellerslie, Remuera and St Heliers BIDs have sufficiently met the BID Policy Requirements and the BID Policy for setting of the BID targeted rates for 2024/2025.

49.     Staff advise the local board to recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for 2024/2025 as set out in Table One.

 

 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

50.     Through targeted rate-funded advocacy and activities, BID-operating business associations promote and can facilitate environmental sustainability programmes and climate response where appropriate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

51.     Advocacy is a key service provided by business associations that operate a BID programme. BID-operating business associations ensure the views and ambitions of their members are provided to elected representatives and council teams, including CCOs, on those policies, plans, programmes, and projects that impact them.

52.     BIDs work across several Council Controlled Organisations including Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku and Tātaki Auckland Unlimited.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

53.     The local board’s views are most frequently expressed by its appointed representative on the board of each BID-operating business association. This liaison board member (or alternates) can attend BID board meetings to ensure there is a direct link between the council and the operation of the BID programme.

54.     Ellerslie, Remuera, and St Heliers BID programmes best align with the Orakei Local Board Plan 2023, Outcome: Our Economy

Local rohe, local benefit, local funding

55.     Recommending that the Governing Body sets the targeted rates for Ellerslie, Remuera and St Heliers business associations means that these BID programmes will continue to be funded from targeted rates on commercial properties in their respective rohe. They will provide services in accordance with their members’ priorities as stated in their strategic plans.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

56.     The BID Policy and the annual accountability process does not prescribe or report on individual BID programme’s effectiveness, outcomes, or impacts. However individual BIDs may include this level of detail in other reports provided to their members. This localised project reporting is not a requirement of the BID Policy and is not part of the BID Policy annual accountability reporting.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

57.     There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from business ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the associations every quarter.

58.  The targeted rate is payable by the owners of the business rated properties within the geographic area of the individual BID programmes. 

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

59.     To sustain public trust and confidence in the council, the BID Policy sets out a balance between the independence of the BID-operating business associations and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

60.     For the council to be confident that the targeted rate grant funds provided to the BID-operating business associations are being used appropriately, it requires the BIDs to fully complete all annual accountability reporting and the 19 BID Policy Requirements that are the responsibility of the BID. 

61.     The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy throughout the year including responding to queries and issues raised by council staff, members of the BID, the public and elected members.

62.     We actively grow relationships with council departments that interact with BID programmes to ensure a consistent approach is applied for the programme.

63.     The role of the local board representative is a key link between the parties involved in the BID programme in terms of communication and feedback.  Local Board representatives on BID programmes are strongly encouraged to contact the BID Team if they have any queries or concerns.

64.     This report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds. It provides an annual update that the BIDs operating within the local board area are compliant with the BID Policy.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

65.     If the local board supports this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the BID targeted rates be set as part of the Long-Term Plan 2024/2034 including the annual budget 2024/2025.

66.     After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2024 to Ellerslie, Remuera, and St Heliers BIDs.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

BID Policy 2022 - all requirements and responsibilities for accountability

23

b

Ellerslie BID - Governance Summary

27

c

St Heliers BID - Governance Summary

29

d

Remuera BID - Governance Summary

31

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Gill Plume - BID Senior Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Attachment A: BID Policy Requirements Summary

Requirement number

Requirement

Compliance responsibility

1:

Auckland Council requires BID-operating business associations to fully comply with the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (Kaupapa Hereā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi). 

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

2:

BID programmes should aim to develop economic activities that support and benefit their BID affiliates and provide value to the business community.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee/ members

3:

BID programmes established before 2010 and currently receiving, receiving less than $120,000 targeted rate grant per annum, are required to increase their total ongoing income received (including the BID targeted rate grant) to at least $120,000 per annum by 1 July 2028 (6 years).

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee/

4: If applicable

All establishing BID programmes must operate at a size (geographical) and scale of not less than $120,000 per annum (BID target rate grant) to achieve:

·    A long-term focus for the BID programme

·    Independent long-term financial sustainability of the business association, including securing additional income streams.

·    Adequate resourcing to complete all compliance costs under the policy.

New BIDs

5:

All BID-operating business associations must have a signed current three-year BID Targeted Rate Grant Agreement (Appendix A).

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

6:

The BID targeted rate grant spend must focus on delivering value to BID affiliates.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

7:

The BID targeted rate grant and BID programme resources (management, governance time or funds) cannot be used under any circumstances:

·          For any political purpose

·          and or to endorse or support a particular candidate or political party.

 BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

8: If applicable

BID-operating business association must accept that Auckland Council reserves the right, at its sole discretion (to be exercised reasonably), to review the use of targeted rate grant funds and the need for an audit and anticipates full cooperation from the BID-operating business association.

Auckland Council

9:

BID affiliates must have at all times, access[1] to BID programme information and BID targeted rate spend (section 4).

Information about the business association operating the BID programme including:

How decision-making takes place

How BID affiliates can provide feedback into the BID programme priorities and the BID targeted rate grant spend.

How to become a business association member (membership information and consent process)

·    BID affiliates and association members must have access to the following documents at least 14[2] days prior to the General Meeting (AGM) date:

BID programme annual business plan, including:

§ Activities

§ Outcomes

§ Budget allocations

Draft BID programme income and expenditure budget (upcoming year)

General Meeting Agenda (AGM/SGM)

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee, affiliates, members

10:

Where BID-operating business associations receive funding from Auckland Council or council-controlled organisations in addition to the BID targeted rate grant, council processes require the BID-operating business association be compliant with all accountability requirements associated with that funding.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

11:

All BID operating business associations must complete the annual accountability reporting requirement to Auckland Council by the required dates as defined in Table One – ‘Summary of accountability documents and deadlines’.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

12:

All BID-operating business associations must have a clear delineation between the governance and management of a BID programme.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

13:

All BID-operating business associations must include the following governance practices:

a)   Executive Committee representation

b)   Minimum quorum

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

14:

All BID-operating business associations must have an annual audit (or review) and comply with the following:

c)   Auditor qualification and type of audit – Auditor qualification and Type of Audit

d)   Insurance

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

15:

All BID-operating business association must have written approaches to both governance and management.

 

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

16:

The BID-operating business association constitution and the executive committee board charter must not be inconsistent with the policy.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

17:

All proposed amendments to the constitution concerning the BID programme and BID targeted rate grant funding will require written approval by Auckland Council prior to membership approval at a General Meeting (AGM/SGM).

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

18:

All BID-operating business associations are required to identify, engage, and communicate with:

·    BID affiliates

·    Business association members

·    Local Board BID representative

·    Local Board/s

·    A suitable online platform should be used for BID programme information to be freely available.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

19:

Only BID affiliates qualify as a full member of a BID-operating business association.

 

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

20: If applicable

Auckland Council must be provided with a signed copy of the agreement/contract when a BID-operating business association provides overall management and services to deliver the total BID programme on behalf of another BID-operating business association. Both BID-operating business association executive committees continue to be responsible for their association and to their association members.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee(s),

21:

BID-operating business associations are required to engage in at least one meeting per year with the local board/s. This meeting should be scheduled for a date between the completion of the General Meeting (AGM/SGM) and 10 March.  

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

22:

The BID-operating business association must advise Auckland Council if they become aware that they are not compliant with the BID Policy.

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee

23: If applicable

Completion of Table Three - ‘BID Ballot Processes” is a requirement for:

a)   Establishing a new BID programme

b)   Amendments to an existing BID programme (boundary, rating mechanism or discontinuation).

BIDs – Mgmt. & Executive Committee –

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Ōrākei Local Grant Round Two 2023/2024 grant allocations

File No.: CP2024/04292

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Ōrākei Local Grant and Multi-board Grant round two 2023/2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Ōrākei Local Grants round two 2023/2024 (Attachment A).

3.       The Ōrākei Local Board adopted the Ōrākei Local Board Community Grant Programme 2023/2024 on 20 July 2023. The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants (Attachment B).

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $180,000.00 for the 2023/2024 financial year, with two Local Grant rounds, one Quick Response and Tree Protection round and one Multi-board round.

5.       Twenty-three applications have been received for Local Grants round two 2023/2024 requesting a total of $194,716.37.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received in Ōrākei Local Grant round two, listed in the following table:

Table One: Ōrākei Local Grant round two 2023/2024 grant applications

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2412-220

Akarana Marine Sports Charitable Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost consultant fees from Recreation Sport Leisure Consultancy

$9,750.00

Eligible

LG2412-211

Auckland Basketball Services Limited

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of salary and wages and venue hire at the Barfoot and Thompson Stadium

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2412-209

Auckland Netball Centre Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of removing Wattles, Coprosma, Privet and Tobacco plants at Auckland Netball Centre

$9,750.00

Eligible

LG2412-228

Auckland University Rugby Football Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of the Women's Bathroom refurbishment

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2412-236

Case Basket Communications Limited

Community

Towards the cost of social media advertising, flyers posters and venue hire

$9,300.00

Eligible

LG2412-230

The College Rifles Rugby Union Football & Sports Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards weekly and quarterly maintenance costs

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2412-224

Digital Seniors

Community

Towards salaries wages, operational costs, advertising, printing costs, and stationary

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2412-205

Dunholme Lawn Tennis Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards rates relief for the Dunholme Lawn Tennis Club Incorporated for 2024/2025 financial year

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG2412-208

Eastern Bays Community Patrol Incorporated

Community

Towards petrol costs, car insurance, contents insurance, vehicle servicing, 12 months phone plan costs, yearly Xero subscription, and dash cam costs

$9,562.37

Eligible

LG2412-221

From the Deck

Environment

Towards the cost of weed control and 200 trees

$10,000.00

Ineligible

LG2412-234

Glendowie Boating Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of seventeen helmets, thirty lifejackets and a buoy

$6,852.00

Eligible

LG2412-207

Mano Amiga

Community

Towards venue hire, wages and art supplies

$8,460.00

Eligible

LG2412-235

Mission Bay Business Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of security cameras including installation

$9,989.00

Eligible

LG2412-232

Mission Bay Kohimarama Residents Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of testing at Tagalad Reserve

$10,000.00

Ineligible

LG2412-213

Mission Bay Tennis Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of two Bowdry rollers

$4,100.00

Eligible

LG2412-217

NZ Barok Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards filming costs and editing costs

$4,550.00

Eligible

LG2412-215

Orakei Tennis Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of tennis balls

$3,653.00

Eligible

LG2412-219

The Diocese Of Auckland

Community

Towards the cost and installation of solar panels

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2412-227

Remuera Business Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of a three way security camera

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2412-202

Remuera Chinese Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of venue hire

$10,000.00

Ineligible

LG2412-226

Rumen Rachev

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of professional fees

$6,000.00

Eligible

LG2412-214

Sailability Auckland

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost consultant fees from Recreation Sport Leisure Consultancy

$9,750.00

Eligible

LG2412-225

1st Orakei Sea Scouts

Community

Towards the cost of security cameras including installation

$10,000.00

Ineligible

Total

 

 

 

$194,716.37

 

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·   local board priorities

·   lower priorities for funding

·   higher priorities for funding

·   exclusions

·   grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·   any additional accountability requirements.

 

9.       The Ōrākei Local Board adopted the Ōrākei Local Board Community Grants Programme 2023/2024 on 20 July 2023. The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

14.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Ōrākei Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

16.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

17.     A summary of each application received through Ōrākei Local Grant round two 2023/2024 (Attachment A) is provided.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

19.     Seven applicants applying to Ōrākei Local Grant round two 2023/2024 indicate their project or event target Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

21.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $180,000.00 for the 2023/2024 financial year, with two Local Grant rounds, one Quick Response and Tree Protection round and one Multi-board round.

22.     Thirty-two applications were received for Local Grant round one 2023/2024 requesting a total of $222,525.76 and six applications were received for the Multi-board Grants round one 2023/2024, requesting $36,493.00 from the Local Board and an overall total of $509,053.20.

23.     On the 19 October 2023 thirteen applications from the Local Grant round one 2023/2024 received a total of $55,500.00. The remaining budget amount for 2023/2024 is $124,500.00.

24.     Seven applications were received for the Ōrākei Quick Response round one 2023/2024, requesting a total of $17,633.00.

25.     On the 22 April 2024 a total of $12,028.00 was granted in the Ōrākei Quick Response round one 2023/2024, leaving a remaining amount of $112,472.00.

26.     Twenty-three applications have been received for Local Grants round two 2023/2024 requesting a total of $194,716.37.

27.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     Following the Ōrākei Local Board allocation of funding for the Local Grant round two, Grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Grant Round Two 2023/2024 - application summary

41

b

Ōrākei Community Grant Programme 2023/2024

141

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Arna Casey - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

 

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two      

LG2412-220

Akarana Marine Sports Charitable Trust

 

Legal status:

Charitable Trust

Activity focus:

Sport and recreation

Project: Safe Harbour at The Landing

Location:

The Landing, Okahu Bay 8 - 10 Tamaki Drive Orakei

Summary:

Our Project is a Feasibility Study for a Safe Harbour at The Landing, as I have no doubt you will be aware this is on the OLB's concept plan for the Landing.  We are partnering with Sailability Auckland to secure a total of $19,500 towards the initial stage of this project.  Sailability Auckland's long term objective is to move to The Landing permanently, however this is not going to be possible until there is a Safe harbour that can provide all weather sheltered water for launching our boats and loading sailors from wheelchairs etc into boats from a floating pontoon.

Expertise:

The Akarana Marine Sports Charitable Trust have delivered the multimillion dollar Hyundai Marine Sports Centre.

Dates:

04/06/2024 - 04/10/2024

People reached:

5,000

% of participants from Local Board

40%

Promotion:

We will include the Boards logo on all material that goes out as part of the feasibility study and on Social media about the Safe harbour, we are also very happy to include the boards logo on our website.

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

This project once completed is going to be a fantastic asset for the local community and all Marine Sports based at the Landing. The Safe harbour will provide sailors and paddlers and other Marine based sports with a safe sheltered space to launch their boats including Safety Boats. The benefits for Sailability Auckland are numerous, including being integrated with
a mainstream Yacht Club with outstanding facilities, attracting more volunteers as we will have a bigger visual presence, being able to sail in all tides which will mean we can expand our programmes. The Safe harbour will also be a great asset for running large events like World Championships and the Landing will become a much more attractive venue to host events of this size. This will also have a positive effect on local businesses as it will bring hundreds of visitors to the area.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

 

 Ōrākei

·     The recreational needs of different users are met

The project supports this priority as a Safe Harbour will allow greater numbers of people to access the Marine environment in most weather conditions and will provide much higher levels of safety especially in high winds. The Safe harbour will be used by sailors and paddlers and other Marine based sports. The Safe harbour will also be a great asset for running large events like World Championships and the Landing will become a much more attractive venue to host events of this size. This will also have a positive effect on local businesses as it will bring hundreds of visitors to the area.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

Sailability Auckland

Design, fundraising

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·     No Māori outcomes identified

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - As we are partnering with Sailability Auckland the Safe  Harbour will provide them with a safe way of accessing their boats.  The Safe harbour and related infrastructure will make the Landing not only the most accessible place in Auckland for people with disabilities to access Marine sports and leisure but probably also the most accessible in the country.

Healthy environment approach:

Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes

By providing a safe place to access the marine environment for all Marine sports based
at The Landing. The Safe harbour will provide greater safer access to the sea for sailors, paddlers and other Marine sports groups. This will make getting active and out on the water much easier for all users.

 

 

Does your project support any genders, ages or ethnicities specifically?

No

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$9750.00

Requesting grant for:

All 16 stages as outlined above and in the attached "Safe Harbour Needs and Options Study"

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

It would be extremely difficult to proceed without the full amount of funding.

Cost of participation:

No

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$19500.00

$0.00

$9750.00

$0.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Safe Harbour Needs and Options Study

$19500.00

$9750.00

 

Income description

Amount

Once we have completed the Feasibility Study for the project and move into the de- sign work we will be starting a Fundraising Campaign to fund the project

$0.00

 

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

Sailability Auckland will also be applying to OLB for Funding for this project

$9750.00

Pending

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

LG2412-220

Safe Harbour at The Landing

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  GA Assessment Completed

Undecided

$0.00

LG2412-128

Outdoor Furniture for Community Use

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2312-241

Plastic Free Drinking Water

2022/2023 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$3,000.00

LG2212-228

Safer Pathways to the Ocean

2021/2022 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$8,000.00

SRF211-126

 

Regional Sport and Recreation Facilities Operating Grant Programme 2021 -  Submitted

Declined

$0.00


 

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two      

LG2412-211

Auckland Basketball Services Limited

 

Legal status:

Incorporated Society, Charitable Trust, Limited Liability Company

Activity focus:

Sport and recreation

Project: Junior Development Program

Location:

Barfoot and Thompson Stadium

Summary:

We are asking for support for our Clubs and Competitions run at the Barfoot and Thompson Stadium for the local community, this is part of a broader strategy to help get more people of all ages and ability levels active in the community.  The hall is very important as it is a key local access point for the community and helps connect people in the local area.

Expertise:

We have many years experience at running these events.

Dates:

22/07/2024 - 31/12/2024

People reached:

160

% of participants from Local Board

100%

Promotion:

On our facebook page

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

More children active in sport
More skilled children taking part in sport and accessing regular play
Better physical and mental health
Better access for the broader community

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

 

 Ōrākei

·     The recreational needs of different users are met

Please note we are applying to more than three local boards but no more than two for any one project.
 
This projects helps to get more people active in sport and recreation and encourages them to stay active long term.

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·     No Māori outcomes identified

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - Everyone is encouraged to play

Healthy environment approach:

Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes

This helps get people in the community active especially young people

 

 

Does your project support any genders, ages or ethnicities specifically?

The sport is very popular with young Maori but is not targeted at any one ethnicity.  The project is for people of all ages and ability levels.

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$10000.00

Requesting grant for:

Barfoot and Thompson Hall Hire (excluding College Sport), Referees and Court Managers - please note the contracts will be upgraded to above minimum wage before April 1st, and Affiliation Fees 2024.

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

Please note in the other funding listed above the pending applications to Four Winds and Pub Charity Limited will not be made till much later in the year, Four Winds around late April and again later in the year, Pub Charity Limited probably around June or July.  Only the parts that overlap with the timeframe and content of this project have been included.

Cost of participation:

Yes, between $5 and $12 per person per session.

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$69940.00

$27200.00

$25920.00

$6820.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Referees and Court Managers 500 hours at $25 per hour and 500 hrs at $23.15 per hour estimate

$24075.00

$3500.00

Hall Hire Barfoot and Thompson Stadium July 22nd to December 31st excluding College Sport

$23430.00

$5000.00

Affiliation Fees 2024 part cost

$1900.00

$1500.00

Administration, Development, Promotion, Equipment

$20535.00

$0.00

 

Income description

Amount

80 people at $5 per person per session x 20 weeks, 80 at $12 per session x 20 weeks

$27200.00

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

Four Winds Foundation Hall Hire

$15240.00

Approved

 

Four Winds Foundation Hall Hire

$10680.00

Pending

 

Additional information to support the application:

We are keen to get more people physically active in the local community

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

LG2421-231

Community Hubs Program

2023/2024 Whau Local Grants, Round Two -  GA assessment completed

Undecided

$0.00

LG2412-211

Junior Development Program

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  GA Assessment Completed

Undecided

$0.00

LG2413-246

Junor Development Program

2023/2024 ÅŒtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants, Round Two -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

LG2420-240

Competitions and Clubs Program

2023/2024 Waitematā Local Grants, Round Two -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

LG2405-238

Junior Development Program

2023/2024 Henderson-Massey Local Grants Round Two -  GA assessment completed

Undecided

$0.00

ASF2401-125

 

2024 Albert-Eden Accommodation Support Fund -  SME assessment completed

Undecided

$0.00

RegSR16195

 

Sport and Recreation Regional Programme Grant 2024 & 2025 - 

Undecided

$0.00

LG2407-245

Community Hub

2023/2024 Howick Local Grants, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2419-101

Girls Coaching Program

2023/2024 Waitākere Ranges Local Grants, Round One -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,500.00

LG2414-108

Miniball Coaching (including Glory League and Affiliation Fees)

2023/2024 Papakura Local Grant, Round One -  Project in progress

Approved

$2,000.00

LG2415-114

Portable Basketball Project

2023/2024 Puketāpapa Local Grant Round One -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,500.00

LG2411-102

Portable Basketball Project

2023/2024 Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Grant Round One -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,500.00

LG2413-110

Miniball Coaching (including Affiliation Fees and Glory League Fees)

2023/2024 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants, Round One -  Project in progress

Approved

$2,500.00

LG2410-102

Girls Coaching Program

2023/2024 Manurewa Local Grants Round One -  Project in progress

Approved

$2,500.00

LG2309-274

Junior Development Program

2022/2023 Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$3,052.00

LG2312-233

Orakei Junior and Community Development Program

2022/2023 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$5,000.00

LG2205-169

Henderson-Massey Junior Development Program

2022/2023 Henderson-Massey Local Grants Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

LG2321-228

Junior Development

2022/2023 Whau Local Grants, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2320-217

Waitemata Junior and Community Development Program

2022/2023 Waitematā Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,500.00

LG2307-242

Howick Junior Development Program

2022/2023 Howick Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

ASF2301-101

 

20223 Albert-Eden Accommodation Support Fund -  Project in progress

Approved

$10,000.00

LG2309-113

Junior Development Program

2022/2023 Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grants, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2319-101

Junior Development Program

2022/2023 Waitākere Ranges Local Grants, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2321-111

Junior Development Program

2022/2023 Whau Local Grants, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2314-107

Junior Development Program

2022/2023 Papakura Local Grant, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,500.00

LG2315-104

Junior Development Program

2022/2023 Puketāpapa Local Grant Round One -  Project in progress

Approved

$2,000.00

LG2311-118

Junior Development Program

2022/2023 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grant Round One -  Accountability overdue

Approved

$2,500.00

LG2310-105

Junior Development

2022/2023 Manurewa Local Grants Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$5,000.00

LG2211-316

Junior Development Program

2021/2022 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grant Round Three -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2212-211

Junior and Community Development Program

2021/2022 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Review accountability

Approved

$5,000.00

LG2213-206

Junior Development Program

2021/2022 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$3,500.00

LG2220-201

Junior and Community Development in Waitemata

2021/2022 Waitematā Local Grants, Round Two -  Review accountability

Approved

$2,500.00

LG2210-307

Junior Development in Manurewa

2021/2022 Manurewa Local Grants, Round Three -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

ASF2201-104

 

2022 Albert-Eden Accommodation Support Fund -  Accountability overdue

Approved

$11,000.00

QR2219-108

Junior Development Program

2021/2022 Waitākere Ranges Quick Response, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$200.00

QR2221-206

Junior Development

2021/2022 Whau Quick Response Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$600.00

LG2211-214

Maungakiekie-Tamaki Junior and Community Basketball Program

2021/2022 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grant Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2205-102

West Auckland Junior Development

2021/2022 Henderson-Massey Local Grants Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,125.00

LG2214-103

Junior Development in Papakura

2021/2022 Papakura Local Grant, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,500.00

LG2215-113

Junior Development

2021/2022 Puketepapa Local Grant Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2211-125

Junior Development in Maungakiekie-Tamaki

2021/2022 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grant Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

QR2121-312

Whau Junior Development

2020/2021 Whau Quick Response Round Three -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

QR2109-115

Junior Development in Mangere-Otahuhu

2020/2021 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quick Response, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

LG2120-234

Waitemata Junior and Community Development Program

2020/2021 Waitematā Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$3,000.00

LG2113-225

Otara-Papatoetoe Junior and Community Development Program

2020/2021 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$5,000.00

LG2112-215

Orakei Junior and Community Development

2020/2021 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Review accountability

Approved

$8,500.00

LG2111-329

Maungakiekie-Tamaki Junior and Community Development Program

2020/2021 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grant Round Three -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

ASF210108

 

2021 Albert-Eden Accommodation Support Fund -  Review accountability

Approved

$7,000.00

LG2110-302

Manurewa Junior Development Program: St James College and Local Schools

2020/2021 Manurewa Local Grants, Round Three -  Acquitted

Approved

$5,000.00

QR2101-209

First Aid Training

2020/2021 Albert Eden Quick Response Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2112-122

Community and Junior Development in Orakei

2020/2021 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2011-236

Coach Development and Training Costs

2019/2020 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$626.08

LG2005-225

Junior Development In Henderson-Massey

2019/2020 Henderson-Massey Local Grants, Round Two -  Accountability overdue

Approved

$1,500.00

MB1920-2114

Junior in School Coaching

2019/2020 Multi-board Local Grants Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$3,400.00

ASF2001-05

 

2020 Albert-Eden Accommodation Support Fund -  Accountability overdue

Approved

$7,000.00

LG2007-310

Howick Junior Development Program

2019/2020 Howick Local Grants, Round Three -  Acquitted

Approved

$7,000.00

LG2013-252

Junior Development Program in Otara-Papatoetoe

2019/2020 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2014-124

Junior Coaching in Papakura

2019/2020 Papakura Local Grant, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2012-120

Community Development in the Orakei Area

2019/2020 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$5,000.00

LG2009-125

Mangere-Otahuhu Junior Coaching

2019/2020 Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grants, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2010-115

Manurewa Local Board Junior Coaching

2019/2020 Manurewa Local Grants, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2011-125

Junior Development in Maungakiekie-Tamaki

2019/2020 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2001-122

Albert-Eden Local Board Junior Development Program

2019/2020 Albert-Eden Local Grants, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

PKTSRG1920-02

 

Puketāpapa Local Board Strategic Relationship Grant 2019-2020 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

MB1819-223

West Auckland Junior Development Program

2018/2019 Multi-board Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

LG1909-246

Mangere-Otahuhu Junior Development Program

2018/2019 Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grants, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG1920-210

Waitemata Junior and Community Participation Program

2018/2019 Waitematā Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$4,000.00

LG1914-212

Papakura School Coaching

2018/2019 Papakura Local Grant, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG1907-301

Howick Junior Development Program

2018/2019 Howick Local Grants, Round Three -  Acquitted

Approved

$7,000.00

LG1913-211

Otara-Papatoetoe Junior Development Program

2018/2019 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

LG1912-204

Orakei Basketball Junior Development Program

2018/2019 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG1911-118

Junior Development in Maungakiekie-Tamaki

2018/2019 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round One -  Accountability overdue

Approved

$4,000.00

LG1910-129

Manurewa Maori Youth Development Program

2018/2019 Manurewa Local Grants, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG1814-231

Juinior Coaching in Papakura Schools

2017/2018 Papakura Local Grant, Round 2 -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,000.00

LG1811-331

Junior Development in Maungakiekie-Tamaki

2017/2018 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Three -  Submitted

Declined

$0.00

LG1801-233

Junior and Youth Development In Albert-Eden

2017/2018 Albert-Eden Local Grants, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG1820-216

Growing Youth and Community Basketball in the CBD

2017/2018 Waitematā Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

LG1813-219

Coaching Basketball to Juniors in Otara-Papatoetoe Schools

2017/2018 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants, Round Two  -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,500.00

LG1805-203

Henderson-Massey Indoor Junior Basketball Programs to Grow Junior Participation

2017/2018 Henderson-Massey Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,500.00

LG1807-311

Howick Indoor Junior Basketball Programs to Grow Junior Participation

2017/2018 Howick Local Grants, Round Three -  Acquitted

Approved

$3,000.00

LG1814-101

Providing Community Programs at the Bruce Pulman Park Centre

2017/2018 Papakura Local Grant, Round 1 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG1812-110

Community Development in Panmure Orakei Area

2017/2018 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$5,000.00

CASF_141500054

Office lease assistance

Central Community Group Accommodation Support Fund 2014-2015 -  Acquitted

Approved

$23,750.00

ASF14_100068

Central office lease (Sport Auckland House)

Central - Community Accommodation Support Fund - Round 1 2013/2014 -  Acquitted

Approved

$7,475.00


 

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two      

LG2412-209

Auckland Netball Centre Incorporated

 

Legal status:

Incorporated Society

Activity focus:

Sport and recreation

Project: Removal of all Wattles, Coprosma’s, Privet’s and Tobacco plants

Location:

Auckland Netball Centre, 7 Allison Ferguson Drive, St Johns, Auckland

Summary:

Removal of all Wattles, Coprosma’s, Privet’s and Tobacco plants at Auckland Netball Centre, to provide a safe playing environment for community and participants.  In particular one area is providing a haven for “sleepers” overnight.

Expertise:

As these trees are large we are unable to undertake this project ourselves, due to H&S we need a contractor to come on site and undertake this work.

Dates:

29/04/2024 - 10/05/2024

People reached:

500,000

% of participants from Local Board

44%

Promotion:

 

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

Removal of all Wattles, Coprosma’s, Privet’s and Tobacco plants that spread seeds and multiple allergens. These plants are causing a buildup of mold and are shadowing the courts which is becoming a health and safety issue as players using these courts are potentially at risk of slipping or falling causing injury to themselves. In particular one area, by the resource shed, is providing a haven for “sleepers” overnight.  We also don't want the Wattles coming up under courts and pushing through the asphalt and rubberised courts, which would be an expensive exercise.  Removing these trees will eliminate this risk.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

 

 Ōrākei

·     Neighbourhoods, community centres and public places are safe and attractive

Removal of all Wattles, Coprosma’s, Privet’s and Tobacco plants that spread seeds and multiple allergens.  By removing these plants, we can fulfill our health and safety standards, thereby reducing the risk of slips or falls for members and the community using the courts and eliminating the potential for self-inflicted injuries.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

 

 

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·     No Māori outcomes identified

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

No -

Healthy environment approach:

Promote smoke-free messages, Include waste minimisation (zero waste) messages, Healthy options for food and drink, including water as the first choice, Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes

We have signage up around our netball centre reminding everyone that our centre is a smoke-free and zero waste venue.  We encourage healthy options for food and drink through our onsite cafe and have drinking fountains onsite to refill water bottles.  Auckland Netball offer a range of activities to encourage active lifestyles for all ages.

 

 

Does your project support any genders, ages or ethnicities specifically?

Our centre have a multiple genders, ages and ethnicities that use our centre.
Boys and Girls, Men and Woman
Ages from 5 upwards to 65+
Ethnicities include New Zealand European, Māori, Pacific People, Chinese, Korean, Indian, Asian, Middle Eastern, Latin American and African

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$9750.00

Requesting grant for:

The removal of all Wattles, Coprosma's, Privet's and Tabacco plants.

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

We would like to have the priority area completed by the Resource shed which would cost $2,600.00

Cost of participation:

N/A

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$9750.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Tree Fellas Quote - Preferred Supplier

$9750.00

$9750.00

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

QR2401-214

Community Noticeboard

2023/2024 Albert-Eden Quick Response Grant, Round Two -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

RegSR16229

 

Sport and Recreation Facilities Operating Grant 2024-2027 - 

Undecided

$0.00

LG2412-209

Removal of all Wattles, Coprosma’s, Privet’s and Tobacco plants

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  GA Assessment Completed

Undecided

$0.00

RegSR1658

Indoor/Outdoor Lights Replacement - Auckland Netball

Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2023 - 

Approved

$0.00

0028

Indoor Courts Expansion - Auckland Netball Centre Site

Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2022 - 

Withdrawn

$0.00

SRF211-128

 

Regional Sport and Recreation Facilities Operating Grant Programme 2021 -  Submitted

Approved

$0.00

QRTP2012-203

Game Liaison Manager assistance with salary

2019/2020 Ōrākei Quick Response and Tree Protection, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$3,000.00

NC17-C004

Removal of noxious Wattle trees

2016/2017 CGP non-contestable Central -  Project in progress

Approved

$12,000.00

MTCP-151628

Have a Go at Netball

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Community Partnership Expression of Interest Application 15/16 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

RegRSR1645

After School Netball Coaching

Regional Sport and Recreation Grant 2015/2016 Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

CGAF14_100081

Cross Cultural Schools Project

Central - Community Group Assistance Fund - Round 1 2013/2014 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00


 

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two      

LG2412-228

Auckland University Rugby Football Club Incorporated

 

 

Legal status:

Incorporated Society, Charitable Trust

Activity focus:

Sport and recreation

Project: Refurbishment of Womens Bathrooms

Location:

Colin Maiden Park

Summary:

The funding we are seeking is for the renovation of our women's changing rooms to align with our club's strategic objectives. In recent years, AURFC has made significant efforts to enhance its facilities and promote inclusivity for women and young girls interested in joining our club. 
 
The initial success of the gender-neutral changing rooms has inspired us to continue this momentum. Currently, our women's bathrooms lack essential amenities such as sanitary bins, functional sinks, proper ventilation, and a change table, posing significant challenges for our members. This inadequacy hinders families from staying at the club for extended periods. Therefore, upgrading this facility is crucial for immediate and substantial benefits to the club.

Expertise:

Ongoing maintenance of the clubrooms which has led to us being a favourable choice for a
range of community events.
We successfully managed the facility operations admid and post COVID while ensuring the
facility was maintained. During this time, we also took on the project of building gender
neutral changing sheds during a difficult period for the club. We managed the project
ourselves with support from Watts & Hughes and were able to complete the building project
within the time frame we were given by NZ Rugby.

Dates:

15/06/2024 - 15/08/2024

People reached:

1500

% of participants from Local Board

50%

Promotion:

We have a weekly newsletter that is sent to our wider membership base and we also
acknowledge all funding received at the AGM and at our prizegivings.

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

.In recent years, AURFC has made significant efforts to enhance its facilities and promote inclusivity for women and young girls interested in joining our club. 
The initial success of the gender-neutral changing rooms has inspired us to continue this momentum. Currently, our women's bathrooms lack essential amenities such as sanitary bins, functional sinks, proper ventilation, and a change table, posing significant challenges for our members. This inadequacy hinders families from staying at the club for extended periods. Therefore, upgrading this facility is crucial for immediate and substantial benefits to the club.
With the change to a 15’s game for our Premier Development team we hope for a boost in numbers in our Women's program in 2024 and with a massive jump in junior girls numbers from 2022 to 2023, we want to make sure the club room facilities are ready for further increase of number this year and for future growth.
Access to wonderful facilities, thereby increasing the communities desire to become active
and play sport.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

 

 Ōrākei

·     Neighbourhoods, community centres and public places are safe and attractive

The refurbishment of the women's bathrooms supports the priority of keeping community areas safe and attractive and will not only  benefit our members and visitors to the Club but also the wider
community through the community events held at the club throughout the year.
There is a two fold benefit to the latter to both the Club and the community as being a sports club it is important to find
alternative revenue streams to ensure we can be sustainable long term and providing a venue for community events is welcomed
by the wider community. Ensuring our faciliies are fit for purpose is important in order to remain a viable option for community events.

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·     Māori participation - Māori priority group, target group, high representation or Māori staff delivering

Our membership base includes a significant number of maori women and we know these facilities
will be well utilised by maori from within our club and all other maori women users of the facilities of
which there will be many.

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - We have disabled access.

Healthy environment approach:

Promote smoke-free messages, Include waste minimisation (zero waste) messages, Healthy options for food and drink, including water as the first choice, Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes

We are a sports club and therefore by default encourage community involvement and for all
our members to live a healthy lifestyle.
Our club is increasing numbers in our Senior grades this season which is against the trend in
rugby across the board. We run a comprehensive pre season training programme ensuring
our players are at peak fitness when the season commences.

 

 

Does your project support any genders, ages or ethnicities specifically?

We have a wide range of ethinicities at the club with strong representation from both maori
and pasifica communities. We also have various womens teams between the age of 5 - 30
years old and are looking to add further teams.

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$10000.00

Requesting grant for:

The completion of the Women's bathroom refurbishment.

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

We would look at further fundraising efforts and look at approaching other Trusts.

Cost of participation:

No

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$17215.00

$0.00

$0.00

$7215.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Women's Bathroom Refurbishment

$17215.00

$10000.00

 

Income description

Amount

N/A

$0.00

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

LG2412-228

Refurbishment of Womens Bathrooms

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

LG2312-215

Completion of courtyard linking new changing sheds to club.

2022/2023 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Accountability overdue

Approved

$5,000.00

LG2312-212

Completion of courtyard linking new changing sheds to club.

2022/2023 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Withdrawn

Withdrawn

$0.00


 

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two      

LG2412-236

Case Basket Communications Limited

 

Legal status:

Limited Liability Company

Activity focus:

Community

Project: Florence; Keeping Clothes Alive Longer

Location:

Ōrakei local board area

Summary:

Florence; Keeping Clothes Alive Longer is a social enterprise designed to transform how people treat their clothes in social and one to one settings. If we are to reduce clothing industry waste, it is vital that we treat our clothes with the same patience and care that
our grandparents once did. A creative community approach to this process keeps them out of landfill and helps us maintain and upcycle garments until they are reduced to raw material for use in the clothing industry or businesses like Impactex who turn some of Florence's waste into insulation and signage.

Expertise:

Case Basket Comms ( as it is branded) works regularly with EcoMatters and other changemakers whose work is underpinned by behaviour change principles. I have instigated and been part of food scraps roll out events, and am in the middle of delivering events and education for Florence in South East Auckland, focusing on Manurewa, Pakuranga, Howick, Onehunga, Howick and Māngere Bridge. 
 
I have also, as Director, completed Oxfam and Open University's How Change Happens course, which was thoroughly useful and enlightening. 
 
Additionally, I have over 10 years of experience in public relations and public engagement. Add that to my 15+ years in the fashion industry from age 19 to 34 years and it's a magic combination!

Dates:

01/06/2024 - 30/11/2024

People reached:

9000

% of participants from Local Board

10%

Promotion:

As a public relations expert I plan to showcase this area of work and the Board's support to the media. All promotional assets, including social media, will include a thanks to the Board, in the same way I have thanked Auckland Council for their support in South East Auckland by using their logo and appropriate wording on posters and on / in social media posts and conversations.

 

Conflicts of interest: I had the pleasure of working with Board Chair Scott Milne many years ago and see no conflict of interest here.

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

People thoroughly enjoy and benefit from learning something new while being in a social or festive/ public environment. 
 
Everyone relates to worn and unwanted clothes and no one wants to think that their community is responsible for inflating the damage that clothes in landfill are already doing. 
 
So the benefits of this project are similar to the outcomes previously listed: stonger social networks; further small community led events and get togethers; Ōrakei as a community will see less clothing waste into their rubbish bins; local community op-shops that are already struggling under the weight of clothing they cannot actually sell will not receive as much from the local community because they have been collectively educated.
 
As described earlier, the community can access all Florence's services at community centres and in public spaces, also by appointment. Please see an image of our events listed on Humanitix to show how we describe this. Awareness will be increased by significant social media and media coverage, leaflets and posters, which all lead to accessibilty.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

 

 Ōrākei

·     The community benefits from a number of community events

Firstly, let's recognise that the community, its people, and the environment are all intertwined, each reliant on the other to make life sustainable and enjoyable. By supporting Florence's reach into Ōrakei, the Board is helping us support this trifector, which in this case is led by community events. 
 
From my work with Council on the Food Scraps roll out and other projects I've been involved in (as Case Basket Comms), I know that people thoroughly enjoy and benefit from learning something new while being in a social or festive/ public environment. Events like Florence's mobile mending and pop-up events, at the very least, bring a big smile to many a face and lead to shared comments and conversations. 
 
Everyone relates to worn and unwanted clothes and no one wants to think that their community is responsible for inflating the damage that clothes in landfill are already doing, so it is of relevance to all the 90,000 people living in Ōrakei's communities. 
 
So the outcome of this community events approach are several. People will create stonger social networks; some may well start their own sewing circles and small events; people will put less clothing waste into their rubbish bins; they'll think twice about buying new 'fast fashion' and consider community clothing swap parties; they'll send less to their local community op-shops that are already struggling under the weight of clothing they cannot actually sell.

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·     Māori involvement in the design/concept, No Māori outcomes identified

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - While there may be some tasks that a severely disabled or sight impaired person is limited from participating in, all activities are possible for many people with physical and mental disabilties. Support people for some individual/s would be requested on a case by case basist to enable their participation and enjoyment. I have worked with adults and children with disabilties in the past and am confident we can happily make them feel part of workshops and pop ups.

Healthy environment approach:

Include waste minimisation (zero waste) messages, Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes, Encourage the reduction of carbon emissions or increase community resilience to the impacts of climate change*

Florence's entire message and purpose is one of healthy environmental approaches about waste minimisation, care for the environment, healthy human connection. So this is pre-built into the delivery, practice and wording of every event and piece of promotion. Additionally, we advocate walking, cycling for health and the lowering of emissions. We also promote a 'taking the service to the people' approach that reduces many people travelling to a service, to one vehicle travelling to a group. This is part of the social media and public relations plan overall.

 

 

Does your project support any genders, ages or ethnicities specifically?

Our engagement concept includes working with iwi ( Ngāti Whatua Ōrakei) to incorporate collaborations on certain workshops, but this has not been developed at this point. Weaving with waste fabrics is a specific area we are keen to explore. It proudly supports all genders, ages and ethnicities - diversity and vibrancy is a key part of creative waste minimisation.

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$9300.00

Requesting grant for:

As you'll see on the attached general financial projections for 2024-2025, I have higlighted the lines I'm seeking funding for, which is the free pop-up and mobile events (1-2 per month in Ōrakei) plus workshops and room hire, plus the significant advertising to build awareness and increase attendance and impact.

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

I would take a lesser amount and amend the number of pop ups and workshops Florence does by 50%. So, the funding I could accept in this case is $4650. This means the intial impact is lessened but I'm incredibly keen to make some headway with Florence's message and practice in these higher socio-economic, scenic communities so would accept this if the full amount could not be met.

Cost of participation:

The pop ups and mobile mending events are free / the workshops are between $20 and $30 depending on venue and subject of workshop

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$18600.00

$3150.00

$0.00

$10400.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Social media advertising

$600.00

$300.00

flyers

$600.00

$300.00

room hire - priced on averages

$2400.00

$1200.00

workshop teaching fees

$9600.00

$4800.00

pop up/mobile engagement fees

$4800.00

$2400.00

posters

$600.00

$300.00

 

 

Income description

Amount

Varied incomes from koha. $25 tickets depending on event, and private commissions

$3150.00

 

 

 

Donated materials

Amount

Fully set up workroom and mobile van and service

$60000.00

 

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

1

42

 

Additional information to support the application:

Yes, I have several letters of support, a stakeholder PDF presentation which I urge you to read, a helpful events screenshot, a covering letter and my general financial projections for Auckland, showing how Ōrakei fits into this.

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

LG2412-236

Florence; Keeping Clothes Alive Longer

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

WMIF2023-069

Florence; Keeping Clothes Alive Longer

WMIF August 2023 -  5a. Declined

Declined

$0.00

CCS24_1_224

Florence; Keeping Clothes Alive Longer

Creative Communities Scheme 24_1 -  Paid

Approved

$7,753.00


 

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two      

LG2412-224

Digital Seniors

 

 

Legal status:

Charitable Trust

Activity focus:

Community

Project: Ōrākei Digital Seniors hubs

Location:

Local libraries and community places

Summary:

Work with libraries and community places to set up Digital Seniors hubs 
Recruit local volunteers to provide one on one coaching support to older adults
Connect with local organisations providing support to older adults to provide a network of wraparound support for seniors if we find someone who needs referring.
Seniors are empowered, confident and able to engage with technology to achieve everyday tasks and are better able to avoid scams.

Expertise:

Digital Seniors has been going in the Wairarapa for 5 years and we have recently completed our first year in Auckland North. The Auckland North Project was a successful pilot which we are planning to grow into East Auckland this year.

Dates:

03/06/2024 - 30/05/2025

People reached:

400

% of participants from Local Board

95%

Promotion:

Logo on all printed collaterall, acknowledgement on social media and relevant events. Invitation to attend any relevent events such as hub openings and the tech expo.

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

Improved social connection for seniors
Reduced numbers of succesful scams
Seniors are included and empowered with technology to be able to take control of their own everyday activities
Seniors are able to engage with Council feedback online
Seniors who are isolated or otherwise needing assistance are referred to other local support services
Volunteers are sourced from the local community and are engaged and connected with other volunteers. Several of our volunteers are new migrants or recently retired people and volunteering with Digital Seniors provides them with social connections and feelings of wellbeing.
We aim for our volunteer coaches to reflect the diverse local community population 
We work closely with Libraries and Community places to collaborate on programming so for instance, with Spark charging for emails starting in May, the library might put on a workshop on signing up for a free email account and then refer seniors to Digital Seniors for support in transferring their various apps and accounts over to their new email.
Community networks and collaboration opportunities are strenghtened

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

 

 Ōrākei

·     Activities that are led by the community, encourage and support people from all walks of life at actively participate in their community

Digital Seniors hubs are delivered by local volunteers who are trained and police vetted. On the North Shore, we have a very diverse group of volunteers ranging from Pakeha retirees to middle aged new migrants and students on working holiday visas. These volunteers come together to provide support for older adults and often work out ways to make use of each others skills to provide the best outcomes for seniors. We run social activities for the volunteers to connect outside of the hubs too. We also have a network of providers who we can reach out to if a senior needs extra support. This might be legal advice from the CAB or knowing where to go for dementia support or, as was recently the case, being connected to Asian Family Services as an isolated senior new migrant. The seniors who visit our hubs are able to engage with technology to perform everyday tasks such as booking tickets to a show; paying a bill or communicating with friends and family overseas. Seniors are not restricted on how many times they can attend. One regular of
our North Shore hubs hubs has learnt how to use zoom and Google Drive in order to learn te reo Māori. Another senior was assisted to resolve a situation where she was hacked by a boyfriend and our volunteers enabled her to protect herself. In this instance
we connected the senior with the CAB through our ecosystem of support.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

Neighbourhood Support

Community partner

Asian Family Services

Part of our steering group/community partner

CAB

Part of our steering group/community partner

Age Concern

Part of our steering group/community partner

Haumaru Housing

Part of our steering group/community partner

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·     Māori participation - Māori priority group, target group, high representation or Māori staff delivering

Our Auckland North project regularly has Māori seniors attending. One of the senior stories attached in supporting documents is about one of these attendees on his Te Reo journey. We also intend to approach Ngāti Whatua Ōrākei Marae to see if they are interested in having a hub on site with local rangatahi volunteering to support their kaumātua. We spoke with someone from the marae about this at the Splash Landing event in March and they thought it would be of interest.

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - We actively provide support to seniors with vision and hearing difficulties through our work

Healthy environment approach:

Encourage the reduction of carbon emissions or increase community resilience to the impacts of climate change*

We actively support seniors with accessing support following last year's devastating floods through referring them to Age Concern's Storm Navigators and also enable them to access online information on preparing for future climate change effects.

 

 

Does your project support any genders, ages or ethnicities specifically?

The project supports seniors in terms of providing support for older people with technology but the project also benefits volunteers who may be younger people as well as retirees.

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$10000.00

Requesting grant for:

Towards delivering Digital Seniors Hubs in the Ōrākei Local Board area.

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

We would need to do the full project but would have to seek further community funding. We operation on a 60% corporate sponsorship and 40% community funding model so we would need to find the remainder of the community funding from another source/grant.

Cost of participation:

no

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$113643.00

$0.00

$90000.00

$13643.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Staff costs

$37968.00

$700.00

Proportion of operational costs

$63375.00

$0.00

advertising marketing

$4800.00

$4800.00

Coach meeting costs

$1800.00

$1800.00

Hub costs

$2400.00

$2400.00

printing and stationery

$300.00

$300.00

mileage

$3000.00

$0.00

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

Thriving Communities Grant

$30000.00

Pending

 

Proportion of national corporate sponsorship

$60000.00

Approved

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

15

570

 

 

Additional information to support the application:

Please see attached documents

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

LG2412-224

Ōrākei Digital Seniors hubs

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

LG2408-232

Digital Seniors Hubs

2023/2024 Kaipatiki Local Grant, Round Two -  GA assessment completed

Undecided

$0.00

NHM24_063

Bringing value to East Auckland's Communities through Digital Seniors Hubs

Ngā Hapori Momoho - Thriving Communities Grant 23/24 -  Submitted

Declined

$0.00


 

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two      

LG2412-205

Dunholme Lawn Tennis Club Incorporated

 

 

Legal status:

Incorporated Society, Charitable Trust

Activity focus:

Sport and recreation

Project: Rates relief

Location:

43 Ridings Road, Remuera

Summary:

We seek rates relief. In rates period 2024/2025 our rates are increasing to over $10,000 for the 24/25 period.
 We are a small club with limited income from subscriptions each year and is run by volunteers to keep the costs down. The constant rates cost per annum  threatens the
sustainability of Dunholme Tennis Clubs long term future. In time we may have insufficient funds
 to reinvest in major capital items such as new court surfaces, or repairs to our
clubhouse.
Dunholme Tennis Club is being disadvantaged for owning its own land. The majority of
sports clubs in Auckland are on council land hence pay a minimal/peppercorn rate.
We are appealing to the Council's sense of fairness for encouraging community interaction.

Expertise:

Dunholme Tennis Club has been operating and engaging with the community for over 90
years. We hope this can continue well into the future.
We have been able to undertake projects over the last 10 years of upgrading ther court
surface, installing lights and improving the clubhouse. This was largely paid for by the
clubs savings over the last 12 years. We did not seek any Council funds. Moving forward
we hope to continue to deliver projects ensuring the continuation of this club providing our
expenditure doesnt increase expotentialy . With the rates increase each year  this is at risk.
The rates is 1/4 of our expenditure per annum.

Dates:

01/03/2024 - 28/02/2025

People reached:

450

% of participants from Local Board

100%

Promotion:

 

 

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

Dunholme Tennis Club promotes social interaction within the community. We have club play
for mid week women on Wednesday and Thursday mornings. On Sunday afternoons and
Thursday evenings we have club play for senior members and adults who are non members
wishing to play tennis. On all these occasions all 3 courts are full and the interaction is fun and competitive. On Saturday mornings free junior coaching is very active, with
parents of the children enjoying the social interaction with other parents court side whilst
seeing their children being active improving their tennis skills. Tennis fit is run for adults
wishing to improve their skills on Tuesday evenings and Friday mornings and is open to any
participantes.
This is a very active club with only 3 courts, so it punches above its weight.
The Auckland Sports and Recreation Strategic Action Plan specifically refers to acting fairly
to encourage the growth of sports and recreation in Auckland. Dunholme Tennis Club
undertakes this, to encourage activity on and off the tennis court, with very active club days
open to all providing a relaxed inclusive sense of a community spirit.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

 

 Ōrākei

·     Activities that are led by the community, encourage and support people from all walks of life at actively participate in their community

.At Dunholme Tennis Club we encourage members of the community to partake in tennis as
often as possible. Every day there is coaching , tennis fit, club activities for both senior and
junior members. At every event we encourage members of the community to come along
and join in.
We have 260 junior members which is the largest junior membership of any club in
Auckland. Given we have only 3 courts , this highlights what an active club Dunholme is.
If we are unable to commit to large capital expenditure in the future due to insufficient
funds, this will undermine the future of this Club. Where will the local community and
children go if we cannot afford to stay where we are?
Dunholme Tennis Club was established in 1929, so it has been part of the local community
for over 90 years. The continued benefits to the community of many parents and especially
children are activity, laughter, fair play, a sense of belonging, the list goes on.
.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

 

 

 

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·     Māori participation - Māori priority group, target group, high representation or Māori staff delivering

The nationalities who are members at Dunholme Tennis Clubs is various and including
people identifying as Maori.
This encourages fitness and wellbeing for the children and adults, and participating in the community.

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - Dunholme Tennis Club has wheelchair access to our club rooms. There are stairs which lead
to the 3 courts, which make it slightly more difficult to access. Presently us do not have any
members who are bound to a wheelchair .
Currently there is weekly coaching at Dunholme for children who have either learning of physical disabilities. However not constrained by a wheel chair.

Healthy environment approach:

Promote smoke-free messages, Healthy options for food and drink, including water as the first choice, Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes

Dunholme Tennis Club encourages physical activity on a daily basis. We are a smoke free
club and when we provide food and drink within the club and when hosting other tennis
teams for inter club we provide healthy food and beverage.
On Saturday mornings it is delightful to see the buzz and activity of school children from the
age of 5 years learning to play tennis and being active.The parents enjoy the social aspect
of chatting with other parents and forming friendships which extends into their children’s
inter club teams as their children get older and begin competition tennis.
At all othertimes the 3 courts are in use for tennis fit, interclub, club days, coaching etc.
Keeping the people of the local area active and engaged.

 

 

Does your project support any genders, ages or ethnicities specifically?

People of all ages, ethnicities and genders are welcome.
 
We just enjoy promoting and playing tennis with those in the community who are interested.

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$3000.00

Requesting grant for:

We are requesting funding for rates relief, which is a quarter of our expenditure per annum

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

If we are able to receive $3000 from the Council for rates relief, this takes alot pressure off the Club , allowing for the continuation of the Club for years to come.
We are a small sports club with income from subscriptions only. We own our land and
are charged residential rates by the Council. In the event of the disolution of this club the
constitution states the clubs assets will pass to an Association with simular objectives.
We hope this will not eventuate. Our contribution to the community spreads far and wide.

Cost of participation:

$10,000 per annum

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$10617.00

$10000.00

$0.00

$10000.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

rates relief

$10617.00

$3000.00

 

 

Income description

Amount

Annual subscriptions

$10000.00

 

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

25

3000

 

Additional information to support the application:

 

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

LG2412-205

Rates relief

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

LG2212-108

Rates relief

2021/2022 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,500.00

LG1612-102

Dunholme Lawn Tennis Club ( Inc )

2015/2016 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round One -  Accountability overdue

Approved

$1,000.00

CASF_141500011

Rates relief and additional court hire at Kings School.

Central Community Group Accommodation Support Fund 2014-2015 -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,500.00

ASF14_100111

43 Ridings Road, Remuera

Central - Community Accommodation Support Fund - Round 1 2013/2014 -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,500.00


 

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two      

LG2412-208

Eastern Bays Community Patrol Incorporated

 

 

Legal status:

Incorporated Society

Activity focus:

Community

Project: Essential operational funding 23/24 for Eastern Bays Community Patrol

Location:

Orakei Ward

Summary:

This grant would be to fund our key operational costs for running the patrol.  This includes the basics like car maintenance for the patrol car, insurance for the car and contents, as well as petrol to run the car on patrols and phone/ data plan costs..

Expertise:

Our parent organization CPNZ has established over 180 similar groups throughout NZ - so
provides us with strong expertise and training. We are well established now and have been running patrols for well over 18 months in the local area

Dates:

10/06/2024 - 23/05/2025

People reached:

85600

% of participants from Local Board

100%

Promotion:

we will include the Board logo/ info on promtional material. The Orakei Local Board logo
is clearly displayed on the rear of the Eastern Bays Community Patrol car as a generous
sponsor. The Orakei Local Board is also acknowledged on our website as a sponsor. We
would also acknowledge the grant and the ongoing support of the local board in our
Facebook posts across the multiple Eastern Bays community pages that we have access to.

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

Contributing towards a safer community by patrolling our streets and public areas,. We
provide trained members to assist in any emergency as directed by authorities. We have on
numerous occasions assisted both members of the public and police, one notable occasion
was significant man hours spent looking for a missing person. We also act as a deterrent
through being visible at unpredictable times. Our mere presence when loud music and
alcohol are causing problems for residents can have an immediate effect.. We believe
having patrols present and visible on foot and in the patrol car assists in resident and visitor safety. Also supporting keeping our streets and neighborhood crime free.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

 

 Ōrākei

·     Neighbourhoods, community centres and public places are safe and attractive

We have a dedicated patrol car with 40 plus trained patrollers.. Typically we undertake
approximately 40 - 50 patrols a month, which last 2 - 3 hours each. We have assisted the police and members of the public
on numerous occasions. This includes finding stolen cars, assisting at accidents, reporting
graffiti, assisting during the flooding, and assisting with traffic management when incidents
happen. We actively monitor crime hotspots in the Eastern Bays.  We also have attended many events on foot patrol over summer that have been on in the Eastern Bays.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

Community Patrols of NZ

Collaboration and oversight

NZ Police

Collaboration and oversight

 

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·     No Māori outcomes identified

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - we have a patroller already on our patrol who is in a wheelchair.  The car patrols make the patrolling accessible to him

Healthy environment approach:

Encourage the reduction of carbon emissions or increase community resilience to the impacts of climate change*

walking patrols over car patrols where it makes sense

 

 

Does your project support any genders, ages or ethnicities specifically?

Our project supports all genders, ages and ethnicities as it promotes crime prevention
and safety. Our patrollers range from 18yrs of age to 70+ and includes a diverse range
of ethnicities. We are interested in building a safer community for all and seek a group of
patrollers that reflect our diverse community.

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$9562.37

Requesting grant for:

as stated earlier to pay for essential operating costs for the patrol.  This includes petrol for the patrol car, patrol car maintenance, car and contents insurance, phone/ data plan costs as well as Xero accounting costs..

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

we would either need to drop down the number of patrols or increase the amount of additional fund raising we are already doing

Cost of participation:

no

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$11562.37

$2000.00

$0.00

$0.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

petrol costs - showing last years costs excluding donations

$8000.00

$6000.00

car insurance

$548.82

$548.82

contents insurance

$390.54

$390.54

patrol car servicing - maintenance

$1021.01

$1021.01

12 months phone plan and phone costs

$1148.64

$1148.64

Xero - accounting costs for 12 months

$297.00

$297.00

dash cam data 12 monthly cost

$156.36

$156.36

 

 

Income description

Amount

Donate a tank of petrol/ quiz night

$2000.00

 

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

 

$$

 

 

 

Donated materials

Amount

 

$$

 

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

30

720

 

 

Additional information to support the application:

 

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

LG2412-208

Essential operational funding 23/24 for Eastern Bays Community Patrol

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

LG2412-126

Summer/Autumn; keeping safe in the Bays

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round One -  Project in progress

Approved

$5,000.00

QRTP2312-214

EBCP - Vehicle Crime Prevention 2023 Project

2022/2023 Ōrākei Quick Response and Tree Protection, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$3,000.00

LG2312-201

Funding continued operations with our designated community

2022/2023 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$8,000.00

LG2212-236

Community Patrols

2021/2022 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$6,000.00

LG2212-134

Eastern Bays Community Patrol

2021/2022 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round One -  Grants refunded

Approved

$6,000.00


 

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two      

LG2412-221

From the Deck

 

 Under the umbrella of: Remuera Residents Association Incorporated

Legal status:

Informal group/ no legal structure

Activity focus:

Environment

Project: From the Deck

Location:

Stream running between Bassett Rd and Ada St.

Summary:

Our project is a neighbourhood project set up to clean the stream. This has necessitated initially rubbish removal, rubbish which has been in the stream for decades.  We monitor the stream health, plant the margins, weed the planting and undertake pest control.

Expertise:

We have been working on this project since 2018, planting in winter and managing weeds through the year to ensure our planting survives. We work with Te Ngahere, professionals in the conservation area. They guide us on planting, pest and weed  control. We have a particular campaign to get rid of privet and of morning glory. Where the gradient is too steep for volunteer workers they employ their professionals.
For the 24/25 season, we would like to note the need for the installation of a drain at the top of our worst slip which was caused by water gushing down driveways and then through properties from Bassett Rd.

Dates:

01/07/2024 - 30/06/2025

People reached:

Probably around 200

% of participants from Local Board

75%

Promotion:

Our newsletter which goes out to our members and numerous other conservation organisations always acknowledges the great help we get from Local Boards and other organisations.

 

Environmental benefits:  Cleaning of the stream which runs down through Newmarket Park to Hobson Bay; stabilising the land, protection of the banks from slips in the future. The planting and maintenance of more canopy trees will protect from future weather events.  Canopies catch rain, protecting soil from erosion.
 
We would like the Board to note our plans for the flood damaged areas of our stream are uncertain. We are consulting drainage experts about the possibility of diverting water flooding from Bassett Rd.  We are not asking for funding for this, but wish to signal to the Board that this is our intention.

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

It brings our neighbourhood together and will, in the long term, increase the stability of the banks of the stream. We work with the Council as we have a mutual benefit in ensuring the stability of the land and the clarity of the stream as it heads down to Hobson Bay. 
The stream brings this small part of our wider community together in a shared project.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

 

 Ōrākei

·     The natural environment is valued, protected and enhanced by our communities

Our main goal is to end up with a stream that feeds healthy water into the Newmarket Stream and subsequently into the Hobson Bay, thus extending the benefits our group provides to the wider community. We plant native trees which clean the stream and stabilise the banks. This is a long term exercise as the slips and gouging of the banks during the January 2023 floods demonstrated. We had considerable damage at each end of the stream where stormwater flows  into and out of the culverts and drains. The middle part of the stream which was unaffected by slips had mature planting.  This project involves most of the householders who live by the stream.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

Te Ngahere

Conservation advice

Conservation Volunteers NZ

Weeding and planting

Hapua Thrive

Water health collaboration

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·     No Māori outcomes identified

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - Anyone who can prepare food and provide refreshments can take part. In addition the elderly, disabled and the very young have all participated our social gatherings and various kinds of assistance, including administration, during the year.

Healthy environment approach:

Include waste minimisation (zero waste) messages, Healthy options for food and drink, including water as the first choice, Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes, Encourage the reduction of carbon emissions or increase community resilience to the impacts of climate change*

Being outside planting, getting rid of weeds and pests, just the very act of being in nature is known to assist good mental and physical health. Our organisation is all about nature. We also take opportunities when we have our community get-togethers to inform and educate people.

 

 

Does your project support any genders, ages or ethnicities specifically?

Our project is specifically geared to benefiting the waters of Auckland, both our small city stream, the Newmarket /Middleton Stream and Hobson Bay. In benefiting these areas it benefits all those who live alongside the streams and waterways. It also benefits any Aucklanders using Hobson Bay and other parts of the Waitemata harbour. 
Our project benefits people living in our inner city suburb by enabling community gatherings with a purpose. Many of our participants are older Aucklanders, often retired, so this is a god way in which they can be involved with their community. We are continuing to reach out to younger people particularly through our planting days. 
Our planting and weeding days are accessible to all in that there are those of us who prepare food and provide refreshments to those who go down to the valley even when we ourselves are not able to.

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$10000.00

Requesting grant for:

1 Plant pest control.
2 Specimen tree planting of key broad leaved species, puriri, kohekohe, titoki, karaka, pohutukawa

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

We would modify each element of our project, extending the years required to get to the goal of a valley of canopy trees. We would definitely not reduce the weed control as without it trees die.

Cost of participation:

No. It's not an event.  We run working bees where possible, but where the land is unstable or steep Te Ngahere make decisions on this .

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$10000.00

$0.00

$3000.00

$0.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Weed control

$5850.00

$5850.00

Canopy and other trees 200 trees : site prep,  supply and plant

$4150.00

$4150.00

 

 

Income description

Amount

No income

$0.00

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

We are applying to both Orakei and later in April to  Waitemata Local Board's  Quick Response grants.

$3000.00

Pending

 

Donated materials

Amount

Our neighbourhood group supplies our work -  all administration, photocopying, working bees, weed clearance, monitoring of the valley and reporting to Te Ngahere with whom we meet frequently either in our homes or in the valley.  We run and pay for all the social and neighbourhood gatherings.  It is difficult to assess the monetary value of this but the attached figure is an estimate based on the fact that a number of our neighbours have professional expertise such as geologist, scientist, design, legal, computer experts.

$25000.00

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

100

480

 

Additional information to support the application:

Our financial information is held by our support person at Healthy Waters, Donna Carter  works with Theresa Pearce.
 
Remediation of flood damage: One  member is a geologist and says this:
We have given considerable thought to  the ongoing 2025-6 programme but remediation remains uncertain because:
(i) the damage and upstream causes of the January 2003  slips have yet to be remedied
(ii) no work has been carried out  to access and repair the cracked sewer pipe located along the stream floor. This is WaterCare Job # 15463706.
 
This, however, does not impede work on undamaged, flourishing stream banks.

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

LG2412-221

From the Deck

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00


 

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two      

LG2412-234

Glendowie Boating Club Incorporated

 

Legal status:

Incorporated Society

Activity focus:

Sport and recreation

Project: Learn To Sail

Location:

37 Glendowie Road, Glendowie

Summary:

As we have had a tremendous success with recruitment recently and lots of new sailors coming through, we would really like to upgrade our suite of learn to sail equipment, which we provide to children as part of our learn to sail programme. This includes helmets, life jackets, spray jackets, booties and bouys. This gear is crucial to have in good condition as life jackets & spray jackets save lives! These items do deteriorate quickly and have a certain life span also. As the saying goes, there is no such thing as bad weather, just bad clothing & having sailors safe and warm on the water is paramount. Life jackets are of course, compulsory.

Expertise:

We have been successfully been running the Introduction to Sailing and Learn to Sail programmes for several years now.  It's a matter of maintaining the gear to a quality standard and ensuring the kids are safe and comfortable on the water.  With the right gear, it makes all the difference.

Dates:

01/06/2024 - 01/09/2024

People reached:

As safety equipment has a life span of potentially 5 years or even more, we are looking at hundreds of people.

% of participants from Local Board

80%

Promotion:

We have been keeping our facebook page really active lately, so we will tag Orakei Local Board & the suppliers with new photos. We will publish it in our newsletter which goes out weekly. We will happily put a sponsorship plaque on the wall! We could even invite some councilors to come down and 'have a go', would love to make a happy news item too. We need more of that!

 

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

The unique thing about our club and the activities we hold, is that we are not a 'drop and run' facility for school holidays and after school care. So every single new sailor that we have at our club, isn't just an individual, it's a whole family. As parents we really love it because - as another mum so succinctly put it "It's like an instant social club". Personally, we moved to Auckland in September 2022 and Learn to Sail was the first thing I joined the kids up for (apart from school) and it has been really amazing. We have had a lot of new members recently, our club rooms are full for the first time in years! We are so lucky to get so many families together.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

 

 Ōrākei

·     Activities that are led by the community, encourage and support people from all walks of life at actively participate in their community

Because the boating club is family run, every single family is actively involved in getting the kids out on the water - big kids and little kids! There are lots of different roles we have in the club to keep it running smoothly. 
 Many of our club members are Coastguard Members and have completed safety courses such as the Maritime VHF Operator's Certificate, Day Skipper & Sea Kayaking. Having such active members is invaluable as we live on a coastal area. 
 
Our parent run galley is held every sailing day & has a small fundraising component with all purchases made at the galley. Every few weeks we hold a sausage sizzle or burger day where club members are encouraged to invite family members and friends, these are always wonderful occasions. 
 
Our club often holds regattas in conjunction with other sailing clubs in the area. We often invite Bucklands Beach Yacht Club members over to race & every year we have the East Auckland Series with Howick, Bucklands Beach, Maraetai and Glendowie Boating Clubs. There is some stiff friendly competition and it's great for the kids to travel to other destinations to sail. 
 
We actively recruit our older sailors (that have gone through the ranks) that might like to learn new skills by having them coach the younger learn to sail kids. This has been wonderful and we really enjoy seeing the kids growing up and showing great leadership skills. Many of our sailors have gone on to represent their schools, have joined race teams with larger boats & we are proud of their achievements. 
 
Every Saturday our clubrooms host the Technical Harriers Club, which is one of New Zealand's oldest remaining athletics clubs. Nowadays their focus is on walking and conservation, it's lovely to have our club as a base for them as it's such a great spot to start excursions from by foot.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

 

 

 

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·     No Māori outcomes identified

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

No -

Healthy environment approach:

Include waste minimisation (zero waste) messages, Healthy options for food and drink, including water as the first choice, Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes

We always have a no littering policy and kids know to tie their water bottles onto their boats. We have 'treasure hunts' at the club when the kids look for rubbish washed up at low tide. 
Our galley has home made baking and healthy food options including free coffee and tea for parents and visitors (which is a hit)
We have loads of programmes for sailors at the club; Introduction to Sailing, Learn to Sail, Adventurers & Upskillers, Racing teams, Adult sailing and fun days. We are looking forward to our closing day on the 4th May when the parents will race coaches! 
The kids once or twice a season also go over to Karaka Bay or Bucklands Beach (weather/tide permitting) and do a scavenger hunt (rubbish pick up) combined with a picnic or iceblock. It's a great adventure and it has a really positive result too.

 

 

Does your project support any genders, ages or ethnicities specifically?

Introduction and Learn to sail is targeted at younger children from 9 to around 13. When they get older they get a bit to big to learn to sail on an optimist. This is open to boys and girls, although we have been getting more girls recently which is great!

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$6852.00

Requesting grant for:

Purchase helmets, life jackets, spray jackets, 1 upright buoy

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

We would simply use whatever funds we are provided to purchase a portion - priority life jackets - compulsory. 2nd priority Helmets as strongly recommended. 3rd Spray Jackets as cold sailors are miserable and 4th Buoy. $2000 would cover the life jackets.

Cost of participation:

no as Introduction to Sailing and Learn to Sail are ongoing things - we operate these regularly throughout the year. But Intro to Sailing is $460 per child and Learn to Sail is $360 per child.

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$6942.54

$11220.00

$800.00

$1000.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Helmets

$1282.99

$1282.99

Lifejackets, dinghy tops

$5209.56

$5209.56

buoy

$449.99

$449.99

 

 

Income description

Amount

Introduction to Sailing 15 sailors @ $460 each. Learn to sail, 12 sailors @ $360 each

$11220.00

 

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

Self funded through our galley takings for the season

$800.00

Approved

 

 

Donated materials

Amount

 

$$

 

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

 

 

 

 

Additional information to support the application:

It's a great club. Joining this club has made a huge difference to our family as new 'locals' to the area. We have got a huge extended family and we all love being part of the GBC crew. Come down and see for yourself on Saturday 4th May. Details will be on facebook soon! We can even put you in a lifejacket and on the water. Such a blessing to have this little slice of paradise as our home.

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

LG2412-234

Learn To Sail

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

LG2312-245

Safety RHIB (Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat)  Engine Replacement

2022/2023 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$7,362.00

LG1712-208

Ramp Extension

2016/2017 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Grant not uplifted

Approved

$10,000.00


 

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two      

LG2412-207

Mano Amiga

 

 

Legal status:

Charitable Trust

Activity focus:

Community

Project: HOLA, Spanish school holiday program

Location:

Meadowbank community center

Summary:

We want to provide a first school holiday program in Spanish, sharing our Latin American vibes .
Affordable price for parents and long duration program (8:30 - 3 pm)
Interaction with local community  ( children from any culture can participate in the school holidays of term 2 and 3, 2024)
Various activities to learn or reinforce the Spanish language.

Expertise:

A few years ago our organization carried out a pilot project called Manitos ( little hands) in Glenn Ines, obtaining excellent results and benefiting Latin American families. In adition we have some professional volunteers, who will have a roster and will support the teacher aides to run the activities.

Dates:

08/07/2024 - 15/11/2024

People reached:

Maximum 15 children and their  families

% of participants from Local Board

80%

Promotion:

The logo of the local board will be included in all advertising material such as flayers, and in social networks, interviews and voice to voice it will be mentioned that it is a joint project.

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

The local community will be able to have access to a Spanish. holiday program. (Children between 5 and 13 years old)
 Will be accessible for children of different cultures,  where they will have the opportunity to learn Spanish.
For Spanish people will be an opportunity to practice their mother tongue, specially for children with mix parents. 
For parents it is a benefit due to its affordable price and long duration of the activities. Last day of first and second program (July and October) the children will offer a spanish performance open to community, specially for elderlies living in resthomes and retirement villas.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

 

 Ōrākei

·     Activities that are led by the community, encourage and support people from all walks of life at actively participate in their community

We are a latin american charity working in Auckland from 2010. 
During the last 4 or 5 years the number of latinos are increasing considerably and many of the new settlers are living in Orakei Board. We want to encourage them to be part of the whole community. They are generaly young families with children in primary and intermediate schools. 
Offering a school holiday program in Spanish to affordable prices, the parents and children will share their latin vibes with all the community.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

Graciela Melillan , psicoeducator

Volunteer every day afternoon

Victoria Ara, nutricionist

Support to parent about healthy food

Natalia Troncoso, registered councellor

Planification of some activities

Daniela Palma, ocupational therapist

Volunteer every morning

Claudia Molina

Volunteer twice a week

 

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·     No Māori outcomes identified

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - Autist children with their parents can participate and children in wheelchair as well.

Healthy environment approach:

Healthy options for food and drink, including water as the first choice, Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes

We will encourage parent to send healthy lunch boxes, without too much sugar and prioritizing water instead of fizzy drinks. One day per term the children will go out to walk around the venue to collect rubbish supervised by teachers and volunteers. This will allow them to do physical activities and raise awareness to care about environment.

 

 

Does your project support any genders, ages or ethnicities specifically?

This project is aimed at children from 5 to 13 years old, especially Latin Americans, but all children from any culture who want to learn Spanish will be accepted.

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$8460.00

Requesting grant for:

We are requesting 74,25% of the total cost of the project for to pay teacher aide, help with some hours of rent, some materials and vouchers for our volunteers. Mano Amiga and parents will cover the rest 25,75% (more rental cost, some materials and publicity)

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

We would only carry out one term of the school holidays program, so with 50% of the funding  we can do it.

Cost of participation:

10nzd per child per pay (we require the parent book minimum  3 days per week)

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$11394.00

$2000.00

$74.00

$100.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Hiring place

$3160.00

$400.00

Hiring two teachers, for 4 weeks x 35 hours per week each teacher

$7000.00

$7000.00

Purchase of materials

$574.00

$500.00

Petrol voucher for volunteer teachers

$560.00

$560.00

Photocopies, promotional material and prints

$100.00

$0.00

 

 

Income description

Amount

At lease 10 children per day at $10 each ($500 per week)

$2000.00

 

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

Victor Leal

$74.00

Approved

 

 

Donated materials

Amount

Toys and Spanish books

$500.00

 

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

4

120

 

 

Additional information to support the application:

 

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

LG2412-207

HOLA, Spanish school holiday program

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00


 

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two      

LG2412-235

Mission Bay Business Association Incorporated

 

 

Legal status:

Incorporated Society

Activity focus:

Community

Project: upgrade 8 Cameras and and a TandemVu ANPR camera

Location:

Tamaki Drive Mission Bay

Summary:

The attached quote is to assist us in replacing existing cameras that are failing and installing new ANPR (Automatic Number Plate Recognition) cameras. The ANPR cameras will help service NZ Police and Auckland Transport as they have access to our camera infrastructure through Safer Cities and will receive alerts of flagged number plates.
By replacing existing cameras which are failing we will be ensuring safety for our businesses as well as clear footage for NZ Police, we have had 3 requests for camera footage by NZ Police in March. Year to date our businesses have experienced 4 burglaries and numerous incidents, ie; counterfeit notes, dine and dashes, store vandalism etc.

Expertise:

We have installed a security camera network and are now rolling out improvements to this network as old cameras fail and technology improves.

Dates:

01/07/2024 - 31/08/2024

People reached:

100000

% of participants from Local Board

50%

Promotion:

 

 

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

Improved security cameras will lead to improved security for staff and customers.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

 

 Ōrākei

·     Neighbourhoods, community centres and public places are safe and attractive

By replacing existing cameras which are failing we will be ensuring safety for staff and customers of our businesses.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

Smart surveillance

Installing new cameras

 

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·     No Māori outcomes identified

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - The cameras will monitor everyone in Mission Bay.

Healthy environment approach:

 

 

 

 

Does your project support any genders, ages or ethnicities specifically?

no

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$9989.00

Requesting grant for:

The full amount

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

We would install less cameras

Cost of participation:

0

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$9989.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

purchase and installation of cameras

$9989.00

$9989.00

 

 

Income description

Amount

 

$$

 

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

 

$$

 

 

 

Donated materials

Amount

 

$$

 

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

1

5

 

 

Additional information to support the application:

 

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

LG2412-235

upgrade 8 Cameras and and a TandemVu ANPR camera

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

QRTP2412-109

Mission Bay public AED

2023/2024 Ōrākei Quick Response and Tree Protection, Round One -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,895.00

LG2412-124

Mission Bay Christmas flags and security cameras

2023/2024 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round One -  Follow up

Approved

$4,500.00

LG2312-216

Mission Bay Security Cameras

2022/2023 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round Two -  Project in progress