I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Puketāpapa Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 16 May 2024

10.00am

Local Board Office
560 Mt Albert Road
Three Kings

 

Puketāpapa Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Ella Kumar, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Fiona Lai

 

Members

Roseanne Hay

 

 

Mark Pervan

 

 

Bobby Shen

 

 

Jon Turner

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Selina Powell

Democracy Advisor

 

10 May 2024

 

Contact Telephone: 021 531 686

Email: selina.powell@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                                                        5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                                         5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                         5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                    5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                                                            5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                                                                                       5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                                                                                5

7.1     Insanullah Safi - Petition - 'No More Business as Usual'                                5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations                                                                    6

8.1     Kirstin Cant and Bronwyn Guptill - Roskill South Hub, Healthy Lives. Thriving Communities                                                                                                         6

8.2     Simon and Jasanta Burden - Cleghorn Ave (maintenance and repair work) 6

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                                                      7

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                                              7

11        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Puketāpapa Local Board for quarter three 2023/2024                                                                                                9

12        Puketāpapa Local Grants, Multi-Board Round Two 2023/2024, grant allocations 55

13        Local board appointment to Emergency Readiness and Response Forum         75

14        Local government elections 2025 – order of names on voting documents         83

15        Amendment to the 2022-2025 Puketāpapa Local Board meeting schedule       101

16        Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors' Updates                                           105

17        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                107

18        Board Member Reports                                                                                             113

19        Hōtaka Kaupapa/Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar                   115

20        Record of Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Notes                                          123

21        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of

            Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

22        Te Mōtini ā-Tukanga hei Kaupare i te Marea | Procedural Motion to

            Exclude the Public                                                                                                     131

C1       Puketāpapa Local Board feedback on Pools and Leisure Contract Model        131

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)         whakaū / confirm the minutes of its additional meeting, held on Thursday, 2 May 2024 as true and correct.

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

7.1       Insanullah Safi - Petition - 'No More Business as Usual'

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a petition from Insanullah Safi – resident, titled ‘No More Business as Usual’.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Insanuallah Safi will be in attendance to present and speak to a Petition titled ‘No More Business As Usual’.

Petition Prayer

The petition seeks the Puketāpapa Local Board’s support noting that this petition is part of a greater advocacy that urges New Zealand to implement sanctions on Israel just as it did with Russia.

3.       Link to petition https://our.actionstation.org.nz/petitions/its-time-for-new-zealand-to-place-sanctions-on-israel

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whiwhii/receive the petition and thank Insanuallah Safi for his attendance and presentation.

 

Attachments

a          Petition 'No more Business as Usual'.......................................................... 135

 

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Puketāpapa Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Kirstin Cant and Bronwyn Guptill - Roskill South Hub, Healthy Lives. Thriving Communities

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for Kirstin Cant, (Community Support Worker) and Bronwyn Guptill, (Roskill South Hub – Healthy Lives. Thriving Communities) to provide an update.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Kirstin Cant and Bronwyn Guptill wish to address the local board to provide an update on the Roskill South Hub and to share the joys, strengths and challenges that they see the community facing and how the Hub continues to support the neighbourhood now and in the future.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Kirstin Cant and Bronwyn Guptill for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Simon and Jasanta Burden - Cleghorn Ave (maintenance and repair work)

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1. To enable an opportunity for Simon and Jasanta Burden to address the local board about maintenance and repair work for Cleghorn Ave.

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Simon and Jasanta Burden wish to address the local board about the maintenance and repair work for Cleghorn Ave making the following points:

3.       The overland flow path that flows down Cleghorn Ave has been poorly managed, it is not working, street flooding occurs with small amounts of rain.  The Street flooding is a design error not climate change.

4.       The footpaths on Cleghorn Ave are in a state of disrepair and a major health and safety issue. We have seen many streets, around Auckland, in better condition that have been upgraded, we want to secure our place in the queue.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Simon and Jasanta Burden for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Puketāpapa Local Board for quarter three 2023/2024

File No.: CP2024/05138

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Puketāpapa Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter three, 1 January – 31 March 2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2023/2024 work programme.

3.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with Puketāpapa Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·        a whakarewatanga / ceremony was held for Wairaki / Lynfield Reserve, this marks the first duel name change as part of the local board’s Te Kete Rukuruku project

·        the 2024 Puketāpapa Movies in Parks event was successfully delivered on Friday 9 February 2024 at Monte Cecilia Park to an estimated audience of 2500

·        a funding agreement with the SPCA to run the cat desexing and microchipping programme has been processed and signed. The 'Snip N Chip' programme went live on 13 March 2024.

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). There are no activities with a red status, however, updated information has been received after quarter three from the following activities (currently reported with a green status):

·   ID 1248: Volunteer Recognition Puketāpapa – this activity is deferred to quarter one of the 2024/2025 financial year.

·   ID 371: Local Civic Events – Puketāpapa – no events are scheduled to take place in quarter four.

6.       Net operational financial performance of the local board is approximately 3 per cent below budget for the nine months ended March 2024. Revenue is over budget by 34 per cent for the year to date while operating expenditure is 0.5 per cent below budget mainly due to lower depreciation costs. Capital expenditure is approximately 51 per cent below budget for the nine months ended on 31 March 2024. however, there are no major delivery issues.

7.       Due to work programmes activities with an underspend and revenue that has been received, there is $90,209 available to reallocate to other activities formally by resolution at the local board’s discretion.

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the performance report for quarter three ending 31 March 2024.

b)      reallocate $90,209, which is available due to revenue and underspend, to other activities in the current financial year.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Puketāpapa Local Board has an approved 2023/2024 work programme for the following:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Auckland Emergency Management.

9.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph One: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

10.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

 

 

Graph Two: Work programme performance by RAG status

11.     The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph Three: Work programme performance by activity status and department

Key activity updates from quarter three

12.     Twelve free-to-attend activities and events that support the local community to be physically active were held through the Out and About programme (or other locally focused community or partner organisations and initiatives) and attracted 443 participants.

13.     A whakarewatanga / ceremony was held for Wairaki / Lynfield Reserve. This marks the dual name change as part of the local board’s Te Kete Rukuruku project. Māori naming (and associated storytelling) of parks and places values and promotes Auckland’s Māori identity and use of te reo Māori.

14.     A safety and connections programme for the business community on the western end of Stoddard Road has been agreed as part of the local crime prevention fund, safety initiatives investment in Puketāpapa.

15.     The Puketāpapa Youth Foundation (PYF) has started the new year with recruitment of a new leadership team. Weekly meetings for 2024 recommenced in February and the team are working on various new projects including: recruitment of new members and promoting Auckland Council's Have Your Say consultation in local schools.

16.     Staff partnered with the Welcoming Communities Coordinator to identify initiatives that could receive funding based on previous scoping work. The Roskill Together Trust have been funded to coordinate a Global Friends meet-up programme, aiming to facilitate cross-cultural interaction and learning among ethnic community groups. The Welcoming Communities Coordinator will assist Roskill Together Trust to refine the delivery approach and identify potential participant groups for the programme.

17.     The 2024 Puketāpapa Movies in Parks event was successfully delivered on Friday 9 February 2024 at Monte Cecilia Park to an estimated audience of 2500.

18.     A funding agreement with the SPCA to run the cat desexing and microchipping programme has been processed and signed. The 'Snip N Chip' programme went live as of 13 March 2024 and is being advertised on the SPCA website as well as Puketāpapa Local Board channels.

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

19.     These activities are deferred from the 2023/2024 work programme:

·   ID 20723: Waikōwhai Walkways - development of priority walkway routes. This project is on hold and will recommence in the 2024/2025 financial year.

·   ID 24303: Fearon Park - renew - road and car park within the park. This project is on hold and will be scoped for inclusion in the 2026/2027 work programme due to the large amount of renewal funding required to complete the works.

·   ID 1248: Volunteer Recognition Puketāpapa – updated information received after quarter three advised this activity is deferred to quarter one of the 2024/2025 financial year.

·   ID 3793: Keith Hay Park - Eden Roskill District Cricket Club – New Community Lease – The current lease expires in September 2024 and therefore is deferred to the 2024/2025 financial year

·   ID 3334: Three Kings Reserve, Auckland City Brass Incorporated – New Community Lease - The site has suffered some flood damage and remedial works are being undertaken, once works have been completed, a new lease will be progressed.

Cancelled activities

20.     These activities are cancelled:

·   ID 371: Local Civic Events – Puketāpapa – updated information received after quarter three advised no events are scheduled to take place in quarter four. Therefore, the local board can reallocate $2000 from this activity.

·   ID 3954: Awa Ecological Enhancement – This programme was not able to be progressed and was cancelled in quarter one. Through local board direction, the funding has been reallocated to the following projects. These are:

ID 4135: Snip N Chip - SPCA cat desexing and microchipping programme. Activity funding $10,000.

New Activity: Pest Control for Native Species at Risk - Additional pest control in targeted areas to support biodiversity outcomes in the Manukau Coastal Reserves network. Activity funding $10,000.

Activities merged with other activities for delivery

21.     These activities have been merged with other activities for efficient delivery:

·   ID 3880: Events Unit Production and Civic staff costs for delivery - Puketāpapa Local Board. This activity supports the following work programme activities:

o ID 379: Anzac Day, $2,377

o ID 381: Local civic events, $4,224

o ID 382: Volunteer Awards, $4,480

o ID 383: Movies in Parks, $5,238

o ID 1248: Puketāpapa Christmas Event, $8,906.

Activities with changes

22.     The following work programme activities have been amended to reflect minor change, the implications of which are reported in the table below. The local board was informed of these minor changes and they were made by staff under delegation.

Table One: Minor change to the local board work programmes

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

Activity Name

Change

Reason for change

Budget Implications

26210

Customer & Community Services

Open space drinking fountains and shade sails - action provision priorities - Puketāpapa

Shade sails at Keith Hay Park – full cover – an additional $33,760 is required to deliver this project in financial year 2025 (this can be funded from unallocated FY2025 LDI Capex)

The project team has sourced options for shade sails including costs to install in Harold Long Park and Keith Hay Park. The Board provided direction to proceed with the full cover option at Keith Hay Park.

Noting delivery of the Harold Long / Feron Park shade option using available budget for this financial year remains unchanged.

Additional LDI Capex funding has been allocated to this project in financial year 2025 to deliver the Keith Hay Park, full cover shade sail option.

New Activity - 24218

Customer & Community Services

Monte Cecilia Park – develop playground – consenting and physical works stage

Allocate $20,000 in 2024/2025 financial year to develop a draft playground concept plan

As the number of priority shade sails has been delivered, $20,000 of the remaining budget in the 2024/2025 financial year will be reallocated to the design of the Monte Cecilia playground concept plan.

Remaining budget of $20,000 from ID 26210 has been reallocated to this activity in 2024/2025 to complete the design of the playground concept plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

24.     Work programmes were approved in June 2023 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

25.     The local board is currently investing in a number of sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level. These include:

a)  ID 599: Low Carbon Lifestyles – Puketāpapa. This activity continues the Low Carbon Lifestyle project with a change of focus to sustainable transport behaviours. Addressing these behaviours includes involving and encouraging residents to use active and public transport for their everyday work and leisure commutes. This quarter, engagement has been completed with 27 per cent of responses coming via a leaflet that promoted online participation. Journey analysis resulted in personalised plans being sent to recipients and commitment calls were undertaken resulting in 87 contacts with 70 stated intentions to try other modes of transport. These calls will be followed up by an evaluation call to determine what travel changes have been made. Incentives such as cycle lights, bells for cyclists, shoe lights, emergency ponchos and an Auckland Transport 14-day HOP card trial are being sent to those willing to try a sustainable transport mode.

b)  ID 601: EcoNeighbourhoods Puketāpapa – This activity is continuing to deliver on the existing project from the previous financial year where EcoNeighbourhood groups comprise of six or more neighbours from different households with the objective of adopting sustainable, low carbon practices and increasing resilience within their homes, lifestyles, and neighbourhoods. This quarter, the facilitator focused on supporting groups to develop activities and events as part of the upcoming Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Eco Festival. Highlights included the Ethnic Women's Trust Community Garden, Wesley Primary School, Wesley Community EcoNeighbours and Molley Green EcoNeighbourhood participation in the Puketāpapa kai resilience roadmap project.

c)  ID 603: Climate Action Activator Puketāpapa – This activity is delivering a work programme reflecting the climate action priorities of the local board-specific plan - ‘Becoming a Low Carbon Community – An Action Plan’. The local board’s role is to amplify local climate action and enable community initiatives that contribute to this. The Puketāpapa Activator delivered 16 activities engaging with 288 people and completing 71 bike checks in quarter three. The highlight was the Future festival, the Puketāpapa Activator provided a GSD Cargo Bike and bike trailers to event organisers to use during and packing down the event. They engaged with 75 people and completed 65 bike checks. The Wesley Market activations commenced with a stall held on 19 January and collateral developed for future market stalls.

d)  ID 865: Manukau Harbour Forum – Puketāpapa – This activity will support the operation of the Manukau Harbour Forum and will contribute towards a coordinator to assist with the delivery of the forum’s goals, a youth sustainability wānanga to develop leadership skills, sustainability knowledge and collaborative action projects. During this quarter, all nine local boards that support the forum received workshops. Updates on the work programme were shared, including information on the mahi and delivery undertaken since 2019. The coordinator has completed two of the four planned community engagement hui and feedback to date has been positive. In February 2024, the Manukau Harbour Forum had a table at the re-enactment of Tainui crossing (portage) from the Waitematā Harbour to the Manukau Harbour event. Positive engagement with several community members was made.

 

26.     The Board is also investing in initiatives that respond to climate change, such as – ID 26224: Urban Forest Auckland (Ngahere) Strategy - Planting Plan Puketāpapa. This activity delivers the planting plan identified in the growing phase of the plan. Planning for stage three was underway in Quarter three in preparation of the next planting season.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the local board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     This report informs the Puketāpapa Local Board of the performance for quarter three ending 31 March 2024.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     Table Three outlines the activities in the 2023/2024 work programme that have a direct Māori outcome focus.

Table Two: Māori outcome delivery through individual activities:

1.      

Local Board Plan outcome

ID

Activity name

Māori outcome

Māori outcome description

Outcome 1: Inclusive communities that are healthy, connected and thriving

366

Local implementation of Ngā Hapori Momoho (Thriving Communities) councils social wellbeing strategy – Puketāpapa Local Board

Whānau and tamariki wellbeing

 

Māori identity and culture

 

This activity will have a strong focus on supporting Māori-led initiatives, including empowering individuals, whānau and communities to influence decisions, take action and make change happen in their communities.

368

Manu Aute Kite Day

Māori identity and culture

To celebrate the festival of Matariki

369

Youth: Building the capacity of young people

Realising rangatahi potential

To develop and support young people including Māori rangatahi.

371

Māori responsiveness Puketāpapa

No specific outcome focus areas

 

372

Strengthening Community Connections for an Inclusive Welcoming Puketāpapa

Māori identity and culture

Facilitate collaboration between the community and mana whenua groups to implement new welcoming activities. Welcoming activities include workshops on Te Tiriti.

381

Local civic events Puketāpapa

Māori identity and culture

Direct engagement with mana whenua for the delivery of the events

Outcome 2: Our people speak up and help shape our future

3469 & 26230

PKTPP: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) tranche one

Te reo Māori and Māori identity and culture

Return te reo Māori names and narratives to parks and places

Outcome 3: Our environment is protected and enhanced for present and future generations

599

Low Carbon Lifestyles

Whānau and tamariki wellbeing

 

This programme does not specifically target the housing needs of Māori communities, however according to 2013 census data Māori are more likely to live in rental housing. The home energy advice programme will increase opportunities for promoting and improving living standards that could contribute to better Māori health and wellbeing.

603

Climate Action Activator

Kaitiakitanga

The activator will work with mana whenua and mataawaka to identify and deliver low carbon outcomes for Māori.

865

Manukau Harbour Forum

Kaitiakitanga and realising rangatahi potential

Māori youth will be involved in the youth sustainability wānanga and are supported to develop and implement programmes relevant to them and their communities. The wānanga also engages with kaumātua from Makaurau Marae to provide advice and mātauranga Māori that informs programme delivery. During the wānanga, te reo Māori is actively promoted, as a key component of programme delivery.

3036

Oakley Creek Pest plant buffer

Kaitiakitanga

This programme will protect local parks and streams and encourage others to be kaitiaki of the environment.

Outcome 4: Well planned neighbourhoods and vibrant spaces

1090

Library services – Puketāpapa

Te reo Māori and Māori identity and culture

Libraries provide services and programmes to promote te reo Māori and access to information on Māori culture and history.

16128

Te Auaunga Awa placemaking – Tohu implementation

Te reo Māori and Māori identity and culture

The Te Auaunga Awa placemaking plan includes storytelling at significant sites along Oakley Creek in the Puketāpapa Local Board area.

Outcome 6: Thriving local economy with opportunities to learn, work and volunteer

1270

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days

Realising rangatahi potential

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days will support YES Māori students at participating schools to benefit from the experience and learnings from the YES.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     This report is provided to enable the Puketāpapa Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2023/2024 work programme.

31.     The following work programmes activities with an underspend and revenue that has been received can be changed formally by resolution at the local boards discretion. On 9 May 2024 at a local board workshop, staff presented options these funds could be reallocated towards in this current financial year.

Table Three: Work Programme activities and revenue received that can be changed formally by resolution at the local board’s discretion:

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

Activity Name

Description

Budget Implications

3681

Customer & Community Services

Waikōwhai Coast - pine trees removal FY2023

The resource consent issued is for only 10 pine trees per year which will result in an underspend of $32,000 for the 2023/2024 activity

An underspend of $32,000

371

Customer & Community Services

Local civic events - Puketāpapa

No events are scheduled to take place in quarter four.

An underspend of $2000

N/A

N/A

Commercial lease income received from Watercare

The local board has received income from the commercial lease with Watercare at Keith Hay Park for the Central Interceptor project

Revenue received $54,000

N/A

N/A

Film Revenue

Revenue received from filming in the local board area

Revenue received $2209

Total amount available to reallocate

$90,209

Financial Performance

·    Operating expenditure of $7.6 million is $41,000 below budget.

Asset Based Services operating expenditure (ABS Opex) is $139,000 above budget. This is primarily due to lower depreciation costs than planned.

Locally Driven Initiatives operating expenditure (LDI Opex) is $180,000 under budget. Grant payments to community and strategic relationship grants have yet to be approved and other programmes are to take effect by end of June 2024.

·    Operating revenue of $583,000 is $196,000 above budget. This mainly relates to additional revenue received form commercial lease of Keith Hay Park to Watercare and increased revenue at Fickling Convention and Wesley Community centres due to increase in utilisation.

·    Capital Expenditure of $808,000 is below budget by $770,000. The capital programme is behind schedule and at this stage and mainly refers to the Arthur Faulkner Res-Renew- ex tennis club building and Open space buildings along with various other local renewals programmes.

·    The financial report for the nine months ended 31 March 2024 for the Puketāpapa Local Board area is in Attachment B.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

33.     The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

34.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter four (30 June 2024).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Puketāpapa Local Board - 1 January – 31 March 2024 for quarter 3 Work Programme update

21

b

Puketāpapa Local Board - Operating Performance Financial Summary for quarter three 2023/2024

49

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 





























Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 






Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Puketāpapa Local Grants, Multi-Board Round Two 2023/2024, grant allocations

File No.: CP2024/04538

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Puketāpapa Local Grants Round Two, and Multi-Board Round Two 2023/2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received for the Puketāpapa Local Grants Round Two (Attachment B), and Multi-Board Round Two (Attachment C) 2023/2024.

3.       The Puketāpapa Local Board adopted the Puketāpapa Local Board Community Grants Programme 2023/2024 on 20 July 2023 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $138,543 for the 2023/2024 financial year. A total of $36,500 was allocated in the previous grant rounds. This leaves a total of $102,043 to be allocated to one local, one quick and one multiboard round.

5.       Twenty-five applications were received for Puketāpapa Local Grants, Round Two 2023/2024, requesting a total of $187,706.74, and Twenty-seven Multi-Board, Round Two application were also received requesting a total of $143,485.39.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whakaae / agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Puketāpapa Local Grants Round Two 2023/2024 listed in the following table:   

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2415-202

The Air Training Corps Association of New Zealand Incorporated - No 3 (Auckland City) Squadron Air Training Corps

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of five bushcraft cooking systems and ten tramping tents.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2415-203

Asthma New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards the purchase of nine respiratory health resource carry bags and fifty volunteer uniforms.

$2,300.00

Eligible

LG2415-204

Roskill Together Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of running the community-based "Roskill Fun Run/Walk" event on 19 October 2024, including the costs of the first-aid kit, megaphone, walkie-talkie, safety vests, digital timer, bibs for runners, duffle bag, uniform, folding table-chairs, core flutes, flyers, signage and umbrella organisation admin fee.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2415-207

Dance Therapy NZ

Arts and culture

Towards program facilitation and mentoring, venue hire, marketing, and coordination costs for the "Dance 4 Us Mount Roskill" and STARS Mt Albert, workshops from 1 July to 31 December 2024.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2415-209

Bhartiya Samaj Charitable Trust

Community

Towards venue hire, transport, koha for volunteers, counselling, digital programmes, workshops, activities, and festival celebration associated costs from 1 June 2024 to 31 May 2025.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2415-210

Roopa Aur Aap Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the cost of the counsellor's fee, travel, car registration service, community awareness workshops, volunteer reimbursement, victim support expenses, promotion and marketing from 1 June 2024 to 31 May 2025.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2415-211

Kuldeep Singh

Events

Towards the costs of the stage, lighting, sound hire, generator, bouncy castle, face painter, games, corflute signs and marketing, bin hire and waste removal, for a free one-day community event at the Lynfield Reserve in December 2024.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2415-212

Roskill Together Trust

Community

Towards venue hire, catering, and tai chi instructor's costs for the "Puketapapa seniors’ group'.

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2415-214

New Zealand Business Association Incorporated

Community

Towards wooden tools for a recycled wood carpentry project, marketing, the purchase of electrical equipment, and a container to store chairs and tables for the Wesley Night Market.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2415-216

Sustain & Enable Limited

Community

Towards the cost of delivering two "Energy Advice" workshops, at Fickling Convention Centre from 1 June 2024 to 31 May 2025, including the cost of wages, lightbulbs, venue hire, catering, travel, promotion, and facilitation.

$3,188.00

Eligible

LG2415-217

Auckland United Football Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of 13 flip-top tables for the main lounge of the clubhouse.

$9,032.17

Eligible

LG2415-218

Puketapapa Roskill Sports Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of two custom-printed marquees, six teardrop banners, and a pull-up banner.

$9,767.00

Eligible

LG2415-220

St John’s Presbyterian Church

Community

Towards the purchase of the Sprung structure.

$10,000.00

 

LG2415-221

No. 3 Roskill Theatre

Arts and culture

Towards the stage rental and set up cost for the theatrical production "Welcome Home" at the Turners Reserve from 8 to 10 November 2024.

$9,578.00

Eligible

LG2415-222

Waikowhai Community Trust

Community

Towards the “Molley Green Community Day” on 21 September 2024 including the cost of sound equipment, tents, generators, bins, waste management, bouncy castles, fun activities, and games.

$5,644.72

Eligible

LG2415-223

Auckland Deaf Society Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards two sign language interpreters, bin hire, volunteer expenses, venue, a hangi steam oven, food costs and serving items for the "Auckland Deaf Society's Matariki event" on 29 June 2024.

$7,296.35

Eligible

LG2415-224

SparkleventsNZ Limited

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of hosting Diwali celebrations at the Three Kings Fickling Centre on 5 October 2024, including the cost of venue hire, decorations, stage setup, DJ, advertising, performers koha/gifts, photographer, waste management, cleaning and security.

$8,088.00

Eligible

LG2415-225

New Zealand Nejashi Trust Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of delivering the "Empowering Muslim Women Refugees" programme, from 20 May 2024 to 30 April 2025, including the cost of transport, volunteers, refreshments, administration, support staff, facilitators, and counsellors.

$10,000.00

 

LG2415-226

Action Education Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the facilitator fees, travel, administration, equipment, and resources to deliver 20 spoken word poetry workshops at schools in the Puketapapa local board area.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2415-227

Auckland Somali Community Association Incorporated

Community

Towards delivering the "Strengthening Somali Families Social Wellbeing" workshops, including the cost of venue hire, transport, and bilingual coordinator from 20 May 2024 to 30 April 2025.

$9,375.00

 

LG2415-228

Roskill Together Trust

Community

Towards venue hire, catering, performers koha, coordination and facilitation costs to celebrate the "International Day of Older Persons 2024" in Mt Roskill.

$2,801.80

Eligible

LG2415-229

NZ Ethnic Women Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of workshop facilitation (@$550 x 10), catering, business cards, stickers for branding, "Hua Parakore" annual certification fees, and the purchase of containers for the "NZ Ethnic Women's Trust Roskill Regenerative Enterprise Workshop Series".

$6,635.70

Eligible

LG2415-230

Catalyse Network Limited

Arts and culture

Towards the costs of hosting three two-hour codesign workshops and "GeoLingo" activations in the Puketāpapa LB area, including the costs of workshop facilitation, purchase of rocks, paints and pens, promotion, and resource development.

$7,500.00

Eligible

LG2415-231

New Zealand Islamic Cultural Trust

Community

Towards the purchase of first-aid and basic health kits, the wages of the coordinator, counsellor, tutor, and volunteer (service agreements have been provided for quotes) for the "NZ Islamic Community Trust Children and Youth Resilience and Development" project.

$9,500.00

 

LG2415-232

Umma Trust

Community

Towards the cost of delivering the "Muslim Refugee Women Empowerment and Employment Pathway" programme, including the wages of the social work coordinator, driving instructor, fitness instructor, community support worker and transport for participants.

$10,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$187,706.74

 

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

b)      whakaae / agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Puketāpapa Multi-Board Round Two 2023/2024, listed in Table Two below:

 

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2324-204

David Riley T/A Reading Warrior

Arts and culture

Towards book illustration, design, printing, and shipping costs

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-206

Unity Community Foundation

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire, sports gear, office lease, sports trainers’ wages, office lease, computers, kitchenware, administrative expenses, furniture, and CEO salary, for establishing sport and recreation hubs across Auckland

$10,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-2102

YMCA North Incorporated

Community

Towards crew programme & event delivery costs for Raise Up youth development programme from 1 June 2024 to 31 May 2025

$10,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-216

Age Concern Auckland Trust

Community

Towards wages at 57 Rosebank Road from 1 May 2024 to 30 April 2025

$1,019.00

Eligible

MB2324-217

NZ Council of Victim Support Groups

Community

Towards overall operational expenses

$6,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-218

New Zealand Eid Day Trust Board

Events

Towards venue hire, entertainment, games, operations, marketing, and misc. costs for NZ Eid Al Adha 2024 at Eden Park Stadium

$7,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-221

The Operating Theatre Trust trading as Tim Bray Theatre Company

Arts and culture

Towards ticket cost for disabled or disadvantaged children to attend Mrs. Wishy Washy show from 21 September 2024 to 26 October 2024

$4,891.50

Eligible

MB2324-224

The Re-Creators Limited

Community

Towards cost of rent, tools, equipment, admin, tutor, project management, marketing to deliver Community DIY skills-based upcycling workshops from 1 May 2024 to 27 September 2024.

$4,725.00

Eligible

MB2324-228

Pet Whisperer Rescue Trust

Environment

Towards desexing, veterinary care including euthanasia, vet consults, and microchips & registration cost from 1 June 2024 to 1 December 2024

$7,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-231

Every Body is a Treasure Charitable Trust

Community

Towards facilitator costs from 1 April 2024 to 28 February 2025

$6,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-234

Earth Action Trust

Community

Towards logistic support contractor, container rent, volunteer reimbursement, van cost to deliver TeamUp 2 CleanUp project from 1 June 2024 to 31 May 2024

$7,500.00

Eligible

MB2324-235

PP Grief Support & Education Charitable

Community

Towards counselling and room hire.

$3,500.00

Eligible

MB2324-240

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards contractor fees for volunteer training and triage supervision.

$3,500.00

Eligible

MB2324-246

Auckland Pilipino Trust

Community

Towards wreath, printing, audio system, flowers, cleaning, facilitator, choirs and violin groups, coordinator wage and koha to run Philippine Independence Day event from 12 June 2024 to 17 June 2024

$300.00

Ineligible

MB2324-249

Aotearoa Resettled Community Coalition Incorporated

Community

Towards the camera and gear rental, participant vouchers, filming, and production costs of a multimedia documentary project.

$8,943.89

Ineligible

MB2324-250

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

Community

Towards accommodation, radio advertising, mentor manager wage and volunteers psychological screening for programme delivery from 30 September 2024 to 30 August 2025

$6,500.00

Eligible

MB2324-251

Garden to Table Trust

Community

Towards salaries, mileage, and home office costs for the Garden to Table Food Education Programme

$4,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-255

Unlabeled Limited

Community

Towards home office, accountancy, cell phone, developer program, banking, marketing, translations, web hosting app and web hosting site and equipment cost for Rokket - tool adaptation and support for digital inclusion from 1 May 2024 to 30 April 2025

$10,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-266

Recreate NZ

Community

Towards event facilitation, volunteer costs, activity costs, transportation, and venue hire for Urban Youth Programmes for Rangatahi with Disabilities across Tāmakai Makaurau

$2,800.00

Eligible

MB2324-270

Habitat for Humanity Northern Region Limited

Community

Towards Healthy Home Programme delivery costs including the purchase of intervention items and contribution to community education from 1 July 2024 to 30 June 2025

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-273

Auckland Softball Association Inc.

Sport and recreation

Towards a proportion of annual operating expenses excluding salaries

$10,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-276

Epilepsy Association of New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards fuel cost to deliver Epilepsy Support Services from 1 May 2024 to 30 April 2025

$160.00

Ineligible

MB2324-281

The Voices of Hope Trust

Community

Towards marketing costs.

$4,000.00

Ineligible

MB2324-285

MLA Incorporated

Community

Towards venue, catering and materials.

$2,300.00

Ineligible

MB2324-286

Te Raranga Charitable Trust

Community

Towards external facilitation cost, marketing, media, office expenditure, venue hire, resource, and consultancy cost to deliver LinkUp programme from 1 May 2024 to 31 October 2024

$10,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-288

New Zealand National Refugee Youth Council

Community

Towards Innovation lab trainer, venue hire, catering cost to run Auckland Innovation Lab Programme at Fickling Convention Centre from 8 July 2024 to 20 June 2025

$4,934.00

Eligible

MB2324-299

Feelings for Life Charitable Trust

Community

Towards venue hire, catering, wages, resources and graphic design at 30 Tamaki Drive from 1 June 2024 to 1 July 2025

$3,412.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$143,485.39

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       Auckland Council’s Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·    local board priorities

·    lower priorities for funding

·    exclusions

·    grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·    any additional accountability requirements.

 

9.       The Puketāpapa Local Board adopted the Puketāpapa Local Board Community Grants Programme 2023/2024 on 20 July 2023 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

10.     The community grants programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

11.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $138,543 for the 2023/2024 financial year. A total of $36,500 was allocated in the previous grant rounds. This leaves a total of $102,043 to be allocated to one local, one quick and one multiboard round.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the local board grants programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include:

·    local food production and food waste reduction

·    decreasing use of single-occupancy transport options

·    home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation

·    local tree planting and streamside revegetation

·    education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

15.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Puketāpapa Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

17.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they can increase their chances of success in the future.

18.     A summary of each application received through Puketāpapa Local Grants, Round Two, Multi-Board, Round Two, 2023/2024 applications is provided in Attachment B, and Attachment C.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

20.     Eight applicants applying to Puketāpapa Local Grants Round Two, nineteen applicants applying to the Multi-Board Round Two, 2023/2024 indicate projects that target Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted 10 Year Budget 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

22.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $138,543 for the 2023/2024 financial year. A total of $36,500 was allocated in the previous grant rounds. This leaves a total of $102,043 to be allocated to one local, one quick and one multiboard round.

23.     Twenty-five applications were received for Puketāpapa Local Grants, Round Two 2023/2024, requesting a total of $187,706.74, and twenty-seven Multi-Board, Round Two applications were also received requesting a total of $143,485.39.

24.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Following the Puketāpapa Local Board allocating funding for round two of the local grants, and multi-board grants, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Puketāpapa Local Board Community Grants Programme 2023/2024

67

b

Puketāpapa Local Grants Round Two 2023/2024 - grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Puketāpapa Multiboard Round Two 2023/2024 - grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moumita Dutta - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 








Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Local board appointment to Emergency Readiness and Response Forum

File No.: CP2024/05155

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To make appointments for participation in a Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Forum, coordinated by Auckland Emergency Management.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The role that local board members play during an emergency is becoming an increasingly important element of emergency management.

3.       To support this role, a Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Forum is proposed.

4.       The terms of reference (Attachment A) show that the forum will have no decision-making role or budgetary responsibility. The vision will be “local board members with an interest in emergency management working together to strengthen their role in emergency readiness and response.”

5.       The forum will provide participants with opportunities to learn more about readiness and response in a collaborative environment, to increase their capacity to advocate for readiness and response measures, and to provide informal guidance to staff on related issues.

6.       After local boards make their appointments, an initial Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be scheduled for July.

7.       Staff recommend the forum meet three times a year. Additional meetings can be arranged if there is urgent content that requires discussion between scheduled forum sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      kopou / appoint up to three members to participate in the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Following the weather events of January and February 2023, Auckland Emergency Management was subject to several reviews and various recommendations.

9.       Part of the implementation of the recommendations included the establishment of a Planning Unit and an associated Community Planning and Readiness Manager, with a team of seven Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisors, to support readiness and preparedness at the local level.

10.     The Head of Planning Unit commenced 15 January 2024, and appointments to the Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisor roles were made in late 2023, with the last Senior Advisor commencing their role early February 2024.

11.     All local boards have expressed a desire to be more involved in readiness and response, and to be upskilled in advance of another catastrophic weather event.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Local board members are passionate about ensuring the best outcomes for their communities before, during, and following an emergency.

13.     A number of gaps have been identified where, during an emergency, local board members did not have the information they needed to best support their communities and the emergency response. Recent events also highlighted the importance of community readiness, and the role that people played to support each other during a response.

14.     In response to this, the Auckland Emergency Management Planning Manager has written terms of reference (Attachment A) to set out the parameters of an Emergency Readiness and Response Forum, intended to provide elected members with opportunities to:

·    learn more about emergency readiness and response

·    share relevant knowledge with other local board members and with their communities

·    improve connections between participants at a governance level

·    encourage collaboration between local boards to support emergency readiness and response outcomes

·    provide informal guidance to staff in regard to emergency readiness and response

·    share relevant insights with other members of their local boards, as appropriate.

15.     The vision of the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum is “local board members with an interest in emergency management work together to strengthen their role in emergency readiness and response”.

16.     Boards are invited to appoint up to three members to the forum. Participation is at the discretion of local boards, with no obligation to appoint members. Local boards that choose not to appoint any members to the group will receive minutes and be able to watch recording of forum meetings.

17.     The group will have no decision-making role or budgetary oversight.

18.     The terms of reference set out details of meetings and communication for the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum and provide further information about the roles and responsibilities of participants. Staff advice is for the group to meet three times a year, but the meeting frequency and schedule will be confirmed in consultation with the participating elected members.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The formation and operation of the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum has no direct climate impact, particularly as the group will meet online only.

20.     The impacts of climate change on weather patterns mean that catastrophic weather events are likely to become more frequent. Response and readiness will form a significant part of ensuring that impacts on our communities are mitigated where possible.

 

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be administered by staff from the council’s Auckland Emergency Management team, with support from kaimahi in the Local Board Services department.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisors have been meeting with local boards during Q3 to build relationships and develop Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Plans.

23.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum responds to requests from local board members to increase activity in this space and enables development and upskilling that is likely to have a positive impact on the final response plans that are produced.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     Auckland Emergency Management are working with marae to provide support in emergency preparedness activities and to identify marae that may be able to provide support to communities in response.

25.     Potential topics for 2024 Readiness and Response Forum include mana whenua engagement and suggestions for improving iwi involvement at the local level.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be delivered internally and will generate no costs. The group will not manage a budget or have a financial mandate.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     There is a risk that local board members who become members of the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum expect that they will play a central role in emergency response in the event of another weather event.

28.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum is an information-sharing forum, and the Terms of Reference are intended to clarify this, ensuring participants have a realistic expectation of the roles and responsibilities of membership.

29.     The Emergency Management Elected Members’ Guide (July 2023) is a key guiding document for elected members, providing detailed information on the role of elected members in emergency reduction, readiness, response and recovery activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     Local boards that wish to participate in the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will confirm which elected members they wish to appoint to the group.

31.     An initial Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be scheduled for July 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Terms of Reference for Readiness and Response Forum

79

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Anna Wallace - Head of Planning Auckland Emergency Management

Authorisers

Adam Maggs – General Manager Auckland Emergency Management

Oliver Roberts – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 




Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Local government elections 2025 – order of names on voting documents

File No.: CP2024/05607

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback to the Governing Body on how names should be arranged on the voting documents for the Auckland Council 2025 elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 provide a local authority the opportunity to decide by resolution whether the names on voting documents are arranged in:

·    alphabetical order of surname;

·    pseudo-random order; or

·    random order.

3.       Pseudo-random order means names are listed in a random order and the same random order is used on every voting document.

4.       Random order means names are listed in a random order and a different random order is used on every voting document.

5.       The overseas findings on ballot order effects is controversial[1] and based on elections that differ to local government elections in New Zealand. Auckland Council has based its decisions in the past on its own statistical analysis of previous election results.

6.       The order of names has been alphabetical for the 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019 and 2022 Auckland Council elections. From 2016, prior to each election a statistical analysis was conducted by RIMU Research and Evaluation Unit on the results of previous elections which each time has concluded that there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected. The focus was on whether there was any advantage to being listed first.

7.       RIMU extended the scope of the statistical analysis this time to include list positions other than first, and also the effects of “race[2] length”. This takes into account the number of candidates standing for a particular election race. The analysis confirms previous results in terms of candidates listed first but has found that where there are a larger number of candidates, being lower on the list in certain types of election race appeared to confer significant disadvantages. The full analysis is attached as Attachment A.

8.       This effect would be remedied by all names on the voting document being in random order. The disadvantage of random order is that it creates some friction for voters. Friction is anything that makes the voting experience harder. If names are ordered randomly then the voter has to undertake additional effort to identify the voter’s preferred candidates. This works against the overall goal of increasing voter turnout.

9.       Nevertheless, since the evidence is clear that in some cases alphabetical order creates a disadvantage, staff recommend that the order of names on Auckland Council voting documents for 2025 be random order.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback to the Governing Body on whether candidate names on voting documents should be in random order given the statistical evidence that being lower on the list in certain types of election race appears to confer significant disadvantages.

 

Horopaki

Context

Options available

10.     Clause 31 of The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 states:

(1)     The names under which each candidate is seeking election may be arranged on the voting document in alphabetical order of surname, pseudo-random order, or random order.

(2)     Before the electoral officer gives further public notice under section 65(1) of the Act, a local authority may determine, by a resolution, which order, as set out in subclause (1), the candidates' names are to be arranged on the voting document.

(3)     If there is no applicable resolution, the candidates' names must be arranged in alphabetical order of surname.

(4)     If a local authority has determined that pseudo-random order is to be used, the electoral officer must state, in the notice given under section 65(1) of the Act, the date, time, and place at which the order of the candidates' names will be arranged and any person is entitled to attend.

(5)     In this regulation,—

pseudo-random order means an arrangement where —

(a) the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly; and

(b) all voting documents use that order

random order means an arrangement where the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly or nearly randomly for each voting document by, for example, the process used to print each voting document.

Previous elections

11.     In 2013, the council resolved to use alphabetical order of names, a consideration being an additional cost of $100,000 if the council chose the random order. From 2016 there has been no additional cost to use random order, due to changes in printing technology, however the council has chosen to use alphabetical order of names in past elections on the basis that statistical research did not indicate a compelling case to change to random order. 

12.     For the 2022 elections the following table outlines decisions of those regional and city councils whose data was available, with random order being used by 19 out of the 22 councils other than Auckland:

Auckland Council

Alphabetical

Bay Of Plenty Regional Council

Random

Environment Southland Regional Council

Random

Hawke's Bay Regional Council

Random

Manawatū-Whanganui Regional Council

Random

Northland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Otago Regional Council

Random

Southland Regional Council

Random

Taranaki Regional Council

Alphabetical

Waikato Regional Council

Random

West Coast Regional Council

Alphabetical

Christchurch City Council

Random

Dunedin City Council

Random

Hamilton City Council

Random

Hutt City Council

Random

Invercargill City Council

Random

Napier City Council

Random

Nelson City Council

Random

Palmerston North City Council

Random

Porirua City Council

Random

Tauranga City Council (2024)

Random

Upper Hutt City Council

Random

Wellington City Council

Random

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options for 2025

Pseudo-random order and true random order

13.     Random order printing removes name order bias, whereas the pseudo-random order of names simply substitutes a different order for an alphabetical order. For example, any first-name bias will transfer to the name at the top of the pseudo-random list. The only effective alternative to alphabetical order is true random order, which means the order on every voting document is different.

14.     A disadvantage to both the random printing options is that they create friction for the voter. Friction is anything that makes the voting experience harder. If names are ordered randomly then the voter has to undertake additional effort to identify the voter’s preferred candidates. This works against the overall goal of increasing voter turnout if the friction deters any voters.

Alphabetical order

15.     The advantage of the alphabetical order printing is that it is familiar, easier to use and to understand. When a large number of candidates compete for a position it is easier for a voter to find the candidate the voter wishes to support if names are listed alphabetically.

16.     It is also easier for a voter if the order of names on the voting documents follows the order of names in the directory of candidate profile statements accompanying the voting document. The directory is listed in alphabetical order. It is not possible to print it in such a way that each copy aligns with the random order of names on the accompanying voting documents.

17.     The disadvantage of alphabetical printing is that there is now evidence from a statistical analysis of council’s previous election results, that where there are a larger number of candidates, being lower on the list in certain types of election race confers significant disadvantages.

 

Analysis of previous election results

18.     An analysis[3] of the council’s election results for 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019 and 2022 is contained in Attachment A.

19.     Again, the analysis found no compelling evidence that candidates who were listed first were more likely to be elected in the last five Auckland Council elections.

20.     This time the analysis introduced consideration of positions other than first, and also of ‘election race length’ (for example, how many candidates were in each local board or ward race) and also added linear interpolation modelling.

21.     This extended analysis has found that comparing actual votes received proportional to the expected share, being lower on the list in certain types of election race appeared to confer significant disadvantages.

Conclusion

22.     A decision about the order of names on voting documents is made by resolution of the council under clause 31 of the Local Electoral Regulations 2001. Such regulations are provided for in section 139 of the Local Electoral Act 2001.

23.     Section 4 of the Local Electoral Act 2001 requires local authorities, when making decisions under the Act, to take into account the principles set out in section 4. These principles are:

(1)    The principles that this Act is designed to implement are the following:

(aa)   representative and substantial electoral participation in local elections and polls:

(a)     fair and effective representation for individuals and communities:

(b)     all qualified persons have a reasonable and equal opportunity to—

(i)     cast an informed vote:

(ii)    nominate 1 or more candidates:

(iii)   accept nomination as a candidate:

(c)     public confidence in, and public understanding of, local electoral processes through—

(i)      the provision of a regular election cycle:

(ii)      the provision of elections that are managed independently from the elected body:

(iii)     protection of the freedom of choice of voters and the secrecy of the vote:

(iv)    the provision of transparent electoral systems and voting methods and the adoption of procedures that produce certainty in electoral outcomes:

(v)     the provision of impartial mechanisms for resolving disputed elections and polls.

24.     The principles include substantial participation in the elections and public confidence in electoral processes. They also include a principle that all qualified persons have a reasonable and equal opportunity to accept nomination as a candidate. This implies a candidate should not be disadvantaged by virtue of their surname.

25.     While alphabetical ordering of names facilitates participation (supporting one of these principles), there is now evidence that this could disadvantage some candidates if they appear lower on the candidate list (compromising the principle that all persons have an equal opportunity to stand).

26.     In terms of public confidence, for the 2022 elections a website[4] criticised the council’s decision to use alphabetical order. This is the only known criticism however the council needs to be seen to be making this decision in a robust manner.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on the wider group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     Feedback from local boards will be reported to the Governing Body when it is asked to determine the matter by resolution.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     The order of names on voting documents does not specifically impact on the Māori community. It is noted that candidates can provide their profile statements both in English and Māori and that such profile statements are contained in the candidate profile booklet in alphabetic order.  Having voting documents in alphabetic order makes it easier for any voter to match the candidate in the profile booklet.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     There is no additional cost to the printing of voting documents if names are ordered using the random method.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     Given the widespread adoption of random order of names on voting documents among regional and city councils, if names are ordered alphabetically there is the risk of public criticism of the council’s decision.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     The feedback from the local board will be reported to the Governing Body.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo - Analysis of order of candidate names on election outcomes

89

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton – Principal Advisor - Governance Services

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager – Local Board Services

Rose Leonard – General Manager – Governance Services

Nina Siers –  Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 













Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Amendment to the 2022-2025 Puketāpapa Local Board meeting schedule

File No.: CP2024/04743

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to add an additional meeting to the 2022-2025 Puketāpapa Local Board meeting schedule, so the local board can review public feedback on the draft Regional Land Transport Plan 2024-2034 before providing formal views.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the beginning of 2024, there was a central government delay to the delivery of the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024. This delay has affected the delivery of the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) 2024-2034.

3.       Public engagement data on the RLTP will not be available to local boards until 24 June 2024. Local boards must provide their formal views on the draft RLTP before 3 July 2024 to meet Regional Transport Committee deadlines. These timeframes are outside the local board’s normal meeting cycle.

4.       To enable local boards to consider public engagement data before providing formal views, this report recommends the local board approve an additional meeting to the 2022-2025 Puketāpapa Local Board meeting schedule. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve the addition of one meeting at 10.00am on Thursday, 27 June 2024 at Puketāpapa Local Board office, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings to the 2022-2025 Puketāpapa Local Board meeting schedule to accommodate providing formal views on the Regional Land Transport Plan after reviewing public feedback.

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

6.       In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·        clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings.

·        sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

7.       The Puketāpapa Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 business meeting schedule at its 17 November 2022 business meeting PKTPP/2022/155.

8.       At the beginning of 2024, there was a central government delay to delivering the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024. This delay has impacted Auckland Transport’s timeframes on delivering the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) 2024-2034.

9.       Public engagement on the draft RLTP will run from 17 May 2024 until mid-June 2024. Auckland Transport will provide a summary of public feedback to local boards on 24 June 2024.

10.     Local boards must provide formal views on the draft RLTP before 3 July 2024 to meet Regional Transport Committee deadlines.

11.     Local boards expect to see public feedback before providing their formal views. Therefore, it is recommended that local boards resolve their formal views on the RLTP after 24 June and before 3 July. These timeframes are outside the board’s normal meeting cycle.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The local board has two choices:

i)          Add the meeting as an addition to the 2022-2025 meeting schedule.

Or,

ii)         Add the meeting as an extraordinary meeting.

13.     For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for these meetings to be scheduled as additions to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. However, there is a risk that if the RLTP timeframes change again or the information is not ready for the meeting, there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled.

14.     For option two, only the specific topic on the RLTP may be considered for which the meeting is being held.

15.     Since there is enough time to meet statutory requirements, staff recommend option one, approving this meeting as an addition to the meeting schedule, as it allows more flexibility for the local board to consider a range of issues. This requires a decision of the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     There is no specific impact for the council group from this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     There is no specific impact to mana whenua or mataawaka from this report.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     There is a risk that local board views on the RLTP will not be informed by public feedback. This risk is mitigated if the local board resolves to add an additional meeting after the public feedback data is made available on 24 June 2024.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Staff will implement the preferred process when preparing the business meeting schedule.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maclean Grindell - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors' Updates

File No.: CP2024/05140

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors to update the local board on Governing Body issues they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Standing Orders 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provides provision in the local board meeting for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors updates.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Chairperson's Report

 

File No.: CP2024/05142

 

  

 

Te take mō te p,ūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Chairperson, Ella Kumar, with an opportunity to update local board members on the activities she has been involved with since the last meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       It is anticipated that the Chairperson will speak to the report at the meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive Ella Kumar’s Chairperson’s update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair's Report E Kumar - April 2024

109

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 




Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Board Member Reports

 

File No.: CP2024/05141

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the local board members on the activities they have been involved with since the last meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       It is anticipated that Local Board members will speak to their reports at the meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the member reports.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa/Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar

File No.: CP2024/05143

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Puketāpapa Local Board with its updated Hōtaka Kaupapa/governance forward work programme calendar (the calendar).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The calendar for the Puketāpapa Local Board is in Attachment A.  The calendar is updated monthly reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Hōtaka Kaupapa/governance forward work programme calendar as at 07 May 2024.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hōtaka Kaupapa/governance forward work programme calendar

117

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 






Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Record of Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2024/05144

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a summary of Puketāpapa Local Board (the Board) workshop notes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The attached summary of workshop notes provides a record of the Board’s workshops held in April 2024.

3.       These sessions are held to give informal opportunity for board members and officers to discuss issues and projects and note that no binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

4.       For openness and transparency the Puketāpapa Local Board agreed to release their workshop material presentations.  The presentation material from workshops held can be viewed at this link https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/local-boards/all-local-boards/puketapapa-local-board/Pages/puketapapa-local-board-workshops.aspx

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Puketāpapa Local Board workshop notes for: 11 April 2024 and Wednesday, 24 April 2024

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop record 11 April 2024

125

b

Workshop Record 24 April 2024

127

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 


 


 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Puketāpapa Local Board

a)      whakaae / agree to exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Puketāpapa Local Board feedback on Pools and Leisure Contract Model

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report contains on going contractural negotations.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 7.1      Attachment a    Petition 'No more Business as Usual'           Page 135


Puketāpapa Local Board

16 May 2024

 

 




[1] See, for example, “How Much is Enough? The Ballot Order Effect and the Use of Social Science Research in Election Law Disputes”, R. Michael Alvarez and Betsy Sinclair, https://web.archive.org/web/20100615182629id_/http://home.uchicago.edu/~betsy/papers/eljalvarez.pdf

[2] In this analysis a ‘race’ refers to an election in a particular ward or local board in a particular year.

[3] By Ross Wilson in the RIMU Research and Evaluation Unit in 2023. It is noted that the RIMU research did not (and could not) separate out the effects of alphabetical order on the ballot slip, from the effects of alphabetical ordering of the directory of candidate profile statements. The candidate booklet cannot be randomised.

[4] https://thefacts.nz/all/alpha-bias-surnames-in-the-top-3-won-50-of-elections/