I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Henderson-Massey Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 21 May 2024

3.00pm

Hoani Waititi Marae
451 West Coast Road
Oratia

 

Henderson-Massey Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Chris Carter

 

Deputy Chairperson

Dr Will Flavell

 

Members

Brenda Brady, JP

 

 

Peter Chan, JP

 

 

Dan Collins

 

 

Oscar Kightley

 

 

Brooke Loader

 

 

Ingrid Papau

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Laura Hopkins

Democracy Advisor

 

16 May 2024

 

Contact Telephone: 027 501 1350

Email: laura.hopkins@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                                                        5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                                         5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                         5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                    5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                                                            5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                                                                                       5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                                                                                5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation: BirdCare Aotearoa                                                                          5

8.2     Deputation: Amplifying youth voices in Local Board decision-making        6

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                                                      6

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                                              7

11        Ward Councillors' Update                                                                                             9

12        Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grants for 2024/2025                                                                                                                                       11

13        Henderson-Massey Local and Multi-board Grants Round Two 2023/2024 Grant Allocations                                                                                                                    27

14        Henderson-Massey Local Board Grants Programme 2024/2025                         381

15        Amendment to the 2022-2025 Henderson-Massey Local Board meeting schedule                                                                                                                                     391

16        Options for voting methods in local elections                                                       395

17        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Henderson-Massey Local Board for quarter three 2023/2024                                                                                       463

18        Reporting back decisions under delegation                                                          513

19        Chair's Report - Chris Carter                                                                                    523

20        Hōtaka Kaupapa (Policy Schedule)                                                                         527

21        Confirmation of Workshop Records                                                                        531

22        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

23        Te Mōtini ā-Tukanga hei Kaupare i te Marea | Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public        541

C1       Henderson-Massey Local Board feedback on Pools and Leisure Contract Model 541

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

Member

Organisation

Position

Chris Carter (Chair)

1.    St Lazarus Trust

2.    Waitākere Badminton Club

Member

Member

Peter Chan, JP

 

1.    Cantonese Opera Society of NZ

2.    Asian Leaders Forum

3.    NZ-Hong Kong Business Association

4.    NZ-China Business Association

5.    Te Whau Pathway Environmental Trust

Member

Member

Member

Member

Trustee

Dan Collins

1.    Rānui Action Project

Chair

Dr Will Flavell

(Deputy Chair)

1.    Asia New Zealand Leadership Network

2.    Te Atatū Tennis Club

3.    Waitākere Literacy Board

4.    Te Kura

Member

Board Member

Board Member

Member

Brooke Loader

1.     Waitākere Licensing Trust

2.     UDL Energy Complaints Scheme Advisory

3.     Neighbourhood Support

4.     Te Atatū Glendene Community Patrol

5.     Real Estate Authority New Zealand

Member

Member

Member

Volunteer

Member

Ingrid Papau

1.    Liberty Impact Community Trust

2.    #WeLoveTuvalu Community Trust

3.    Neighbourhood Support

4.    Liberty Church

5.    Rutherford Primary Board of Trustees

Board Member

Member

Street Contact

Member

Member

 


 

 

Member appointments

          Board members are appointed to the following bodies. In these appointments the board members represent Auckland Council:

 

External organisation

Lead

Alternate

Massey Matters

Will Flavell

Peter Chan

Central Park Henderson Business Association

Chris Carter

Dan Collins

Heart of Te Atatū South

Brooke Loader

Brenda Brady

Ranui Advisory Group

Dan Collins

Brooke Loader

Te Atatū Peninsula Business Association

Ingrid Papau

Brenda Brady

Waitākere Ethnic Board

Peter Chan

Brooke Loader

Waitākere Healthlink

Ingrid Papau

Brenda Brady

Te Whau Pathway Environmental Trust

Chris Carter

Dan Collins

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)         whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 16 April 2024, and the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 2 May 2024, as true and correct.

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Henderson-Massey Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation: BirdCare Aotearoa

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a deputation on the threat of Avian flu H5N1 arriving on New Zealand shores, through sick migratory sea birds, from Dr. Rashi Parker (Fundraising Manager) and Matua Kevin Ferguson (Chair of Board of Trustees) on behalf of BirdCare Aotearoa.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To discuss with the Henderson-Massey Local Board the imminent threat of Avian flu H5N1 arriving on New Zealand shores, through sick migratory sea birds.

3.       BirdCare Aotearoa is a hospital and rehabilitation centre in Tāmaki Makaurau. The organisation receive between 10-250 sick and injured wild birds daily, rescued by the public, SPCA, Auckland Council, DOC and other agencies.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the presentation and thank Dr. Rashi Parker and Kevin Ferguson from BirdCare Aotearoa for their attendance.

 

 

8.2       Deputation: Amplifying youth voices in Local Board decision-making

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a deputation on amplifying youth voices in Local Board decision-making, from Sarah Finley-Robinson on behalf of InCommon.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To discuss and explore options with the Henderson-Massey Local Board on how to amplify youth voices in Local Board decision-making.

3.       InCommon is an organisation supporting youth development and youth voices, through youth development training, supervision and consulting. The organisation supports Youth Week starting 20-26th of May. This year’s theme is: ‘Māwherangi a tama roto ka taka, kāpuia ake ka pūrangiaho’ translating to ‘We may not have it all together, but together we have it all’.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the presentation and thank Sarah Finley-Robinson, on behalf of InCommon for her attendance.

 

 

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 

Ward Councillors' Update

File No.: CP2024/05391

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a verbal update from the Waitākere Ward Councillors.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A period of 10 minutes has been set aside for the Waitākere Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Henderson-Massey Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      whakamihi / thank Councillors Shane Henderson and Ken Turner for their verbal update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Laura Hopkins - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 

Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grants for 2024/2025

File No.: CP2024/01197

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To confirm Business Improvement District (BID) annual compliance against the Auckland Council BID Policy (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) as of 10 March 2024.

2.       To consider whether the local board should recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for the Central Park Henderson and Te Atatū Peninsula Business Improvement District (BID) programmes for the 2024/2025 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

BID-operating business associations within the local board area

3.       Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are programmes where local business and property owners have agreed to work together to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

4.       The BID Policy includes a total of 23 Requirements, 19 are the direct responsibility of the Business Improvement District (BID) and inform this report. As part of the 19 Requirements, the BIDs are required to provide annual accountability reports which are due 10 March each year.

5.       The BID annual accountability reports on public funds received by the BID within the local board area for the 2022/2023 financial year and has a direct link to council’s Long-Term Plan 2024-2034 and year one of that process to strike the BID targeted rates for 2024/2025.

6.       Henderson-Massey Local Board has two BIDs operating in their local area:

Table 1: BID targeted rate sought 2024/2025

Incorporated Society Name

Proposed 2024/2025 Targeted Rate

Met BID Policy annual accountability reports

 

Central Park Henderson Business Association

$466,560

ü

Te Atatū Peninsula Business Association

$120,000

ü

 

Staff recommend that the local board approves Central Park Henderson and Te Atatū Peninsula BIDs to receive their targeted rate grant for 2024/2025.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      recommends to the Governing Body the setting of the 2024/2025 targeted rates for inclusion in the Long-Term Plan for the following Business Improvement District (BID) programmes:

i)        $466,560 for Central Park Henderson BID

ii)       $120,000 for Te Atatū Peninsula BID.

 

Horopaki

Context

BID Policy and BID targeted rate grant agreement

 

7.       Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2022) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi includes a total of 23 Requirements, 19 are the direct responsibility of the BID-operating business association and inform this annual report. (Attachment A)

8.       The remaining four BID Policy Requirements set out the process for establishing, expanding, and discontinuing a BID programme; and determines rating mechanisms. These will be covered within individual BID local board reports.

9.       The BID Policy does not prescribe or measure standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for business association members to determine. Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

10.     The BID Policy is supported by a BID Targeted Rate Grant Agreement, a three-year agreement signed by both Auckland Council and each BID-operating business association’s executive committee. The agreement sets out the relationship between the parties, how payment will be made and that compliance with the BID Policy is mandatory. The agreement confirms the business associations independence from Auckland Council. All 51 BIDs have signed a BID Targeted Rate Grant Agreement for period 1 December 2022 to 30 December 2025.

11.     This report updates the local board on compliance with the 19 BID Policy Requirements that are the responsibility of the Business Improvement District (BID), with a focus on the BIDs annual accountability reporting (BID Policy Requirements 9, 11 and 18) relating to public funds received by the BID for the 2022/2023 financial year.

12.     This report includes a copy of the individual BIDs Governance Summary documents, Attachment B, and C. These documents include the full resolution detailing the amount of BID targeted rate grant approved by association members at their 2023 AGM for the 2024/2025 financial year. The BID Chair also agrees, by signing this document, to advise council of any perceived or real/current issues that can affect compliance with the BID Policy.

BID Programmes

13.     Local BID programmes should provide value to the collective business community by delivering a suite of economic activities that respond to local needs and opportunities and are agreed by the local business community. BID programmes also provide the opportunity to work with the council group and engage with local boards.

14.    The BID programme does not replicate services provided by the council but channels the capabilities and knowledge of the private sector to improve economic outcomes and achieve common goals.

15.    Each business association operating a BID programme sets the BID targeted rate grant amount at its Annual General Meeting (AGM) when members vote to approve a detailed income and expenditure operational budget and business plan for the following financial year.

16.    Responsibility for delivery and outcomes of the BID programme sits with the individual BID-operating business association executive committee (provision of reporting information) and members (reviewing information provided to them by the executive committee).

17.    All BIDs are registered incorporated societies and need to be aware of the requirement to re-register by April 2026 under the updated Incorporated Societies Act 2022. 

Henderson-Massey Local Board BID Targeted Rates 2024/2025

18.     Henderson-Massey Local Board has two BIDs operating in their local board area. Table 2 shows the amount of targeted rate each BID had approved at their 2023 AGM for the 2024/2025 and linked to the council’s Long-Term Plan 2024/2034 and annual budget 2024/2025 approval process.

Table 2: BID targeted rate changes in 2024/2025

Incorporated Society Name

Proposed 2024/2025 Targeted Rate

Change from previous year

Last year target rate amount was increased

Central Park Henderson Business Association

$466,560

8%

2023

Te Atatū Peninsula Business Association

$120,000

8%

2023

 

Decision making

Auckland Council

19.     The recommendation in this report is put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the Long-Term Plan 2024/2025 and its striking (setting) of the 2024/2025 targeted rates.

20.     In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, the Governing Body is authorised to make the final decisions on what BID programme targeted rates, if any, to set in any particular year or property (in terms of the amount and the geographic area to be rated).

Local Boards

21.     Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body if it is satisfied that the BID is sufficiently complying with the BID Policy.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Regional overview

22.     The BID Policy has been in place since 2022 and applies to 51 BIDs across the ā-rohe, up from 50 BIDs reported in the 2023 report to local boards.

23.     Thirty-six BIDs increased their targeted rates 2024/2025 - between 2 per cent to 50 per cent - while 15 maintained the fiscal status quo.

24.     Of the 11 BIDs with income under the $120,000 minimum (BID Policy Requirement 4), two BIDs now meet this requirement as of 10 March 2024. Of the remaining nine BIDs, three have made no comment to increase their income. Five BIDs have increased their BID Targeted rate grant and are on track to meet this requirement by 1 July 2028 and one has indicated interest in a BID expansion project.

 

Regional BID Programme Growth

25.     Onehunga BID achieved a successful expansion ballot in February 2024. This will see them evolve from a retail-focused BID to encompass retail, commercial and industrial areas, with a significant growth in target rate commencing 1 July 2024.

26.     Kingsland BID has confirmed at their 2023 AGM they would implement a BID expansion project in 2024/2025.

27.     Grey Lynn Business Association will be holding a ballot later this year towards establishing as a new BID from 1 July 2025.

28.     Takanini Business Association is on track to progress their BID establishment project aiming to become a new BID from 1 July 2026.

BID 2024 Accountability Reporting process overview.

29.     Upon receipt of individual BID annual accountability documents, staff follow a set process that includes reviewing the documents provided for 10 March 2024 against the BID policy, analysing changes from the previous accountability period, and following up with BIDs on issues.

30.     Generic observations from year 2024 accountability include:

·    limited local board discretionary funding was available which led to BIDs having a greater focus on efficiencies in their own BID budgets.

·    improving quality of annual discussions between local boards and BID-operating business associations. Less emphasis on operational aspects and more discussion on how they could collaborate together.

31.     The BID Policy, requirement 11, sets out the documents that form the annual accountability reporting documents for each BID. These documents confirm membership decision-making has taken place regarding the BID programme at the 2023 AGM. Other reporting requirements include the filing of annual financial statements with the Companies Office under the Incorporated Societies Act.

32.     The BID team observed this year BIDs have paid less attention to providing the required annual accountability documents by the 10 March 2024 due date, compared with the previous year. Fifty-one per cent (26) of BIDs successfully completed their annual accountability reporting by the due date of 10 March 2024. Forty-one per cent (21) received notification that they had missing information or documents and were provided an extension to the 10 March deadline. 

33.     Four BIDs failed to meet BID Policy Requirement 11 and did not complete annual accountability reporting.

34.     Requirements 9 and 18 of the BID Policy are focused on BID affiliates having access to BID programme information and the BID targeted rate spend. It specifies a range of information BIDs must ensure are easily and freely accessible on a suitable online platform.

35.     This year a one-off ‘Website Check List’ was added to the annual accountablity reporting. 

Henderson-Massey Local Board BIDs

36.     Te Atatū Peninsula BID is one of two BIDs who have moved their income over the $120,000 minimum (BID Policy Requirement 4) and will meet this requirement from 10 March 2024.

37.     Using the documents and information submitted, the BID Team is satisfied that Central Park Henderson and Te Atatū Peninsula BIDs have sufficiently met the BID Policy Requirements and the BID Policy for setting of the BID targeted rates for 2024/2025.

38.     Staff advise the local board to recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for 2024/2025 as set out in Table 1.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

39.     Through targeted rate-funded advocacy and activities, BID-operating business associations promote and can facilitate environmental sustainability programmes and climate response where appropriate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     Advocacy is a key service provided by business associations that operate a BID programme. BID-operating business associations ensure the views and ambitions of their members are provided to elected representatives and council teams, including CCOs, on those policies, plans, programmes, and projects that impact them.

41.     BIDs work with several Council-Controlled Organisations including Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku and Tātaki Auckland Unlimited.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     The local board’s views are most frequently expressed by its appointed representative on the board of each BID-operating business association. This liaison board member (or alternates) can attend BID board meetings to ensure there is a direct link between the council and the operation of the BID programme.

43.     Central Park Henderson and Te Atatū Peninsula BID programmes best align with the Henderson-Massey Local Board Plan 2023, Outcome: Our Economy

44.     Recommending that the Governing Body sets the targeted rates for Central Park Henderson and Te Atatū Peninsula business associations means that these BID programmes will continue to be funded from targeted rates on commercial properties in their respective rohe. They will provide services in accordance with their members’ priorities as stated in their strategic plans.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

45.     The BID Policy and the annual accountability process does not prescribe or report on individual BID programme’s effectiveness, outcomes, or impacts for Māori. However individual BIDs may include this level of detail in other reports provided to their members. This localised project reporting is not a requirement of the BID Policy and is not part of the BID Policy annual accountability reporting.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.     There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from business ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the associations every quarter.

47.     The targeted rate is payable by the owners of the business rated properties within the geographic area of the individual BID programmes. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     To sustain public trust and confidence in the council, the BID Policy sets out a balance between the independence of the BID-operating business associations and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

49.     For the council to be confident that the targeted rate grant funds provided to the BID-operating business associations are being used appropriately, it requires the BIDs to fully complete all annual accountability reporting and the 19 BID Policy Requirements that are the responsibility of the BID. 

50.     Council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy throughout the year including responding to queries and issues raised by council staff, members of the BID, the public and elected members.

51.     We actively grow relationships with council departments that interact with BID programmes to ensure a consistent approach is applied for the programme.

52.     The role of the local board representative is a key link between the parties involved in the BID programme in terms of communication and feedback.  Local Board representatives on BID programmes are strongly encouraged to contact the BID Team if they have any queries or concerns.

53.     This report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds. It provides an annual update that the BIDs operating within the local board area are compliant with the BID Policy.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

54.     If the local board supports this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the BID targeted rates be set as part of the Long-Term Plan 2024/2034 including the annual budget 2024/2025.

55.     After the targeted rates are approved, the council will collect the targeted rate funds effective from 1 July 2024 and distribute them in quarterly BID grant payments to Central Park Henderson and Te Atatū Peninsula BIDs.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

BID Policy Requirement Summary

19

b

CPHBA Governance Summary to 10 March 2024

23

c

TAPBA Governance Summary to 10 March 2024

25

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Gill Plume - BID Senior Advisor

Claire Siddens - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 




Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 

Henderson-Massey Local and Multi-board Grants Round Two 2023/2024 Grant Allocations

File No.: CP2024/04972

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Henderson-Massey Local and Multi-board Grants round Two 2023/2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board adopted the Henderson-Massey Local Grants Programme 2023/2024 as presented in Attachment A on the 18 July 2023. The programme sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the board.

3.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $89,439 for the 2023/2024 financial year for two Local and Multi-board rounds and two Quick Response rounds.

4.       This report presents applications received in the Henderson-Massey Local and Multi-board Grants round two 2023/2024 as presented in Attachment B and C respectively.

5.       Thirty-three applications were submitted for the Local Grant round two, requesting a total of $156,952.23, twenty-six applications were submitted for the Multi-board round two, requesting a total of $126,721.42.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)    agree to fund, part-fund, or decline the following applications:

 

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2405-201

Rānui Community Centre

Community

Towards Te Reo Māori Class Tutor Charges 48 weeks from 3 June 2024 to 30 May 2025

$4,320.00

Eligible

LG2405-202

West Auckland Mental Health Support Trust

Community

Towards equipment rental and course resources, tutor cost for Te Ata Peer-led program at Te Ata Centre from 3 June 2024 to 3 June 2025

$3,500.00

Eligible

LG2405-203

Waitākere Ethnic Board

Community

Towards venue hire, guest speaker, gift cards and printing for events to promote Art, Culture and Heritage during June 3 2024 to 31 January 2025

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2405-204

ECOMATTERS ENVIRONMENT TRUST

Environment

Towards Eftpos related fees, mileage, advertisement and promotion, design cost to deliver E-Waste Recycling and Repair project in Henderson-Massey Local Board from 3 June 2024 to 31 May 2025

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2405-206

Adventure Camp Trust Board Carey Park

Community

Towards Dining Hall Flooring Upgrade at One big Adventure from 3 June 2024 to 5 August 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2405-207

Freyberg Community School

Community

Towards landscaping preparations to facilitate gardening for food at Freyberg Community School from 1 July 2024 to 1 November 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2405-211

RUBYMAMA LIMITED

Community

Towards venue hire, marketing and promotion, volunteer T shirts, flyers, event table and plates for Dumplings Around Neighbours project on 28 June 2024

$2,115.23

Eligible

LG2405-212

Waitākere Cricket Club Incorporated No 2 Account

Sport and recreation

Towards clothing items for Waitākere Cricket Club from 3 June 2024 to 31 October 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2405-213

Brickworks Drama School

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire and cast payments for the performance "Lamingtons with Lysistrata" at Te Atatū Peninsula Community Centre from 14 November 2024 to 23 November 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2405-219

Auckland Environmental Protection Association Incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire, trainer/Instructor/presentation cost, demo equipment, marketing cost, transportation, seeds/materials, communication cost for healthy living and organic food planting at home project from 1 July 2024 to 30 September 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2405-220

Kura Cares Trust

 

Towards equipment costs for Activate Whanau and Hapori (Activate families and Community) project from 15 July 2024 to Date to be confirm (27 December 2031)

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2405-222

Henderson Photographic Society Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards matting supplies, catering, koha, petrol vouchers and advertising at Te Atatū Community Centre from 2 March 2024 to 30 March 2024

$2,100.00

Eligible

LG2405-223

Badminton New Zealand Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of the badminton shuttlecocks and venue hire at the Waitākere Badminton Centre from 27 July 2024 to 28 July 2024

$3,540.00

Eligible

LG2405-224

NZMA - Administration & Operations

Community

Towards trainer cost for Women Fitness and Wellbeing Program from 3 June 2024 to 31 May 2025

$2,750.00

Eligible

LG2405-227

West Auckland Hospice Fundraising

Community

Towards catering cost for Matariki celebration and long service awards lunch at Kelston Community Centre on 26 June 2024

$4,800.00

Eligible

LG2405-228

YouthCan Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards coach and coordinating cost, equipment cost for after school program at Te Atatu Peninsula Community Centre from 22 July 2024 to 23 December 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2405-229

MASSEY RUGBY UNION FOOTBALL AND SPORTS CLUB

Sport and recreation

Toward healthy meals for rugby teams from 1 June 2024 to 31 August 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2405-234

New Zealand Photographic Art A

Arts and culture

Towards transport, photo frame, Mark, formacote card, flyers and photo prints, posters for a photography exhibition from 2 June 2024 to 31 July 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2405-237

Momentum Charitable Trust

Community

Towards facilitated fees for four one-day life and financial skills programmes at Henderson Probation Centre from 3 June 2024 to 31 July 2024

$6,780.00

Eligible

LG2405-238

Auckland Basketball Services Ltd

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire at The Trusts Arena Hall from 1 June 2024 to 31 December 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2405-239

Recreate NZ

Community

Towards activity, volunteer, and rent costs to support West Auckland-based Recreate Programmes from 1 June 2024 to 27 October 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2405-241

West Auckland Youth Development T Trust

Community

Toward staff and venue costs at West City Gym Premises from 1 July 2024 to 20 December 2024

$5,000.00

 

LG2405-242

The Massive Co Trust

Arts and culture

Towards Te Pou Theatre venue hire for Te Ao Hou - Massive Emerging Artists Production 2024 from 21 May 2024 to 28 July 2024

$4,800.00

Eligible

LG2405-243

Sport Waitākere

Sport and recreation

Towards services from Adventure Works at Henderson High School from 17 April 2024 to 29 March 2024

$4,800.00

Eligible

LG2405-245

Te Pou Theatre Trust

Arts and culture

Towards playwrights stipend and festival directors fee for Kōanga Festival 2024 from 24 June 2024 to 29 September 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2405-246

Glass Ceiling Arts Collective Limited

Community

Toward tutor fee at Glass Ceiling Arts Collective West Auckland Theatre Class from 1 June 2024 to 31 May 2025

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2405-247

The Dust Palace Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Toward production cost for Te Kura Maninirau Classes from 1 June 2024 to 31 December 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2405-248

Heart Of Te Atatu South [HOTAS]

Community

Toward coordinator fee, advertising/marketing, resources/prizes, food tea/coffee at Te Atatū South Community Centre from 6 May 2024 to 18 December 2024

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG2405-252

Community Cat Coalition Inc.

Environment

Towards trap, de-sex, return or re-home cats from within the Henderson-Massey local board area from 1 June 2024 to 31 March 2025

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2405-253

Adventure Specialties Trust

Community

Towards kayaks purchasing with delivery to Adventure Specialties from 3 June 2024 to 31 July 2024

$4,447.00

Eligible

LG2405-254

Orb360 Foundation Trust

Community

Towards workshop facilitator cost at Level 2, 6 Kingdon Street, Newmarket from 10 June 2024 to 30 November 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2405-255

Action Education Inc

Arts and culture

Towards 20 sessions of spoken word poetry workshops at St. Dominics College from 10 June 2024 to 13 December 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2405-256

The Gallery

Arts and culture

Towards mentor fees and volunteer expenses for community film project at The Gallery West City from 19 June 2024 to 10 October 2024

$10,000.00

Eligible

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

 

$156,952.23

 

 

 

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2324-202

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards contractors' fee for volunteer training and supervision

$6,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-204

David Riley T/A Reading Warrior

Arts and culture

Towards book illustration, design, printing, and shipping costs

$1,600.00

Eligible

MB2324-205

Waitakere Adult Literacy Inc

Community

Towards library shelving and seating

$3,190.92

Eligible

MB2324-206

Unity Community Foundation

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire, sports gear, office lease, sports trainers wages, office lease, computers, kitchenware, administrative expenses, furniture, and CEO salary, for establishing sport and recreation hubs across Auckland

$10,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-2101

Feelings for Life Charitable Trust

Community

Towards graphic design, videographer, workshop materials, participant resources, facilitator and advisor, administrator and event manager, venue hire, catering, and AV costs for the Kaiako Hauora West Programme

$4,819.00

Eligible

MB2324-2102

YMCA North Incorporated

Community

Towards crew programme & event delivery costs for Raise Up youth development programme from 1 June 2024 to 31 May 2025

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-2106

Interacting

Arts and culture

workshop tutors, venue hire, ramp hire, St John, stage manager, comms rental, site manager, portaloo hire, project manager, and shed 2 coordinator for the InterACT Festival 2024 at the Corban Estate Arts Centre

$8,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-215

Crescendo Trust of Aotearoa

Arts and culture

Towards staff salaries, contractor fee, and operational overheads for delivery of the Crescendo Pathways Programme

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-216

Age Concern Auckland Trust

Community

Towards wages at 57 Rosebank road from 1 May 2024 to 30 April 2025

$3,057.00

Eligible

MB2324-218

New Zealand Eid Day Trust Board

Events

Towards venue hire, entertainment, games, operations, marketing, and misc costs for NZ Eid Al Adha 2024 at Eden Park Stadium

$2,500.00

Eligible

MB2324-219

Seed 2 Harvest Trust Limited

Community

Towards catering, guest speakers, marketing, facilitator fees, venue hire, cooking equipment, gardening materials and garden gift vouchers

$11,840.00

Eligible

MB2324-221

The Operating Theatre Trust trading as Tim Bray Theatre Company

Arts and culture

Towards ticket cost for disabled or disadvantaged children to attend Mrs Wishy Washy show from 21 September 2024 to 26 October 2024

$4,891.50

Eligible

MB2324-224

The Re-Creators Limited

Community

Towards cost of rent, tools, equipment, admin, tutor, project management, marketing to deliver Community DIY skills-based upcycling workshops from 1 May 2024 to 27 September 2024

$4,725.00

Eligible

MB2324-227

East Skate Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards programme delivery costs, which include food, drinks, equipment, professional skate coaches, PA system, and free skateboards for participants

$2,650.00

Eligible

MB2324-235

PP Grief Support & Education Charitable

Community

Towards counselling and room hire

$4,900.00

Eligible

MB2324-238

NZ Writers Guild Inc

Arts and culture

Towards rent, bookkeeping and audit cost for NZWG - the association that advises, advocates for NZ scriptwriters from 1 May 2024 to 31 October 2025

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-250

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

Community

Towards accommodation, radio advertising, mentor manager wage and volunteers psychological screening for programme delivery from 30 September 2024 to 30 August 2025

$6,500.00

Eligible

MB2324-251

Garden to Table Trust

Community

Towards salaries, mileage, and home office costs for the Garden to Table Food Education Programme

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-255

Unlabeled Limited

Community

Towards home office, accountancy, cell phone, developer program, banking, marketing, translations, web hosting app and web hosting site and equipment cost for Rokket - tool adaptation and support for digital inclusion from 1 May 2024 to 30 April 2025

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-266

Recreate NZ

Community

Towards event facilitation, volunteer costs, activity costs, transportation, and venue hire for Urban Youth Programmes for Rangatahi with Disabilities across Tāmakai Makaurau

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-271

Graeme Dingle Foundation Auckland

Community

Towards programme leaders salaries to deliver Kiwi Can programme from 29 April 2024 to 28 March 2025

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-272

Neuro Connection Foundation

Community

Towards cultural advice, kai, and materials for the Moana Conductive Education project

$2,000.00

Ineligible

MB2324-273

Auckland Softball Association Inc.

Sport and recreation

Towards a proportion of annual operating expenses excluding salaries

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-275

Fair Food Trust

Community

Towards staff training, facilitation, staff time, and community wananga costs for transitioning to kaupapa Maori

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-283

Paradesi Force Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire, stage presentation and equipment, administration, volunteer costs, transport, advertising, workshops, trainers, and coaching costs

$2,500.00

Eligible

MB2324-296

Zeal Education Trust - Waitakere

Community

Towards wages, zeal nights, administration, prizes, promotional costs, and data collection, evaluation, and reporting for West Auckland Street Youth Work Project and Community Activations

$5,548.00

Ineligible

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

 

$126,721.42

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world-class city.

7.       The local board grants programme sets out:

a)      local board priorities

b)      lower priorities for funding

c)      higher priorities for funding

d)      exclusions

e)      grant types, the number of grant rounds, and when these will open and close

f)       any additional accountability requirements.

8.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board adopted the Henderson-Massey Local Grants Programme 2023/2024 as presented in Attachment A on the 18 July 2023. The programme sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the board.

9.       The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the Local Board Plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

11.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action.

12.     Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts.

13.     Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction, increasing access to single-occupancy transport options, home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation, local tree planting and streamside revegetation, and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     The focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment, or heritage. Based on the focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice.

15.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Henderson-Massey Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

17.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to the council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The Henderson-Massey Local Board adopted the Henderson-Massey Local Grants Programme 2023/2024 as presented in Attachment A. The programme sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the board.

20.     The Henderson-Massey Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $89,439 for the 2023/2024 financial year for two Local and Multi-board round and two Quick Response round.

21.     This report presents applications received in the Henderson-Massey Local and Multi-board Grants round two 2023/2024 as presented in Attachment B and C respectively.

22.     Thirty-three applications were submitted for the Local Grant round two, requesting a total of $156,952.23, twenty-six applications were submitted for the Multi-board round two, requesting a total of $126,721.42.

23.     Appropriate financial staff have been consulted during this process.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Following the Henderson-Massey Local Board allocating funding to this grant round, grant staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Henderson-Massey 2023/2024 Community Grants Programme

39

b

Henderson-Massey 2023/2024 Local Board Round Two Grant Application Summary

45

c

Henderson-Massey 2023/2024 Multiboard Round Two Grant Application Summary

181

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Bilin He - Grant Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 






Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 









































































































































Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 









































































































































































































Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 

Henderson-Massey Local Board Grants Programme 2024/2025

File No.: CP2024/05204

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Henderson-Massey Grants Programme 2024/2025.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

3.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt its own local grants programme for the next financial year.

4.       Due to wider changes in the Grants Policy, the Multi-board grant round has been cancelled for this financial year. Alternative strategies have been put in place to support applicants to this round and alternatives may be offered in the future.

5.       This report presents the Henderson-Massey Grants Programme 2024/2025 for adoption (Attachment A).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      adopt the Henderson-Massey Grants Programme 2024/2025.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities, and services that benefit Aucklanders.

7.      The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt its own local grants programme for the next financial year. The local board grants programme guides community groups and individuals when making applications to the local board.

8.       The local board community grants programme includes:

·      outcomes as identified in the local board plan

·      specific local board grant priorities

·      which grant types will operate, the number of grant rounds, and opening and closing    dates

·      any additional criteria or exclusions that will apply

·      other factors the local board consider to be significant to their decision-making.

9.       Once the local board grants programme has been adopted, the types of grants, grant rounds, criteria, and eligibility with be advertised through an integrated communication and marketing approach which includes utilising the local board channels.

10.     It has been a long-standing concern around Multi-board Grant applications that:

·        Lower quality applications are received due to less alignment with Local Board plans.

·        Frequent applications for ongoing costs and other lower priority outcomes.

·        Increase barriers for accountability completion as multiple board criteria needs to be met.

·        Confusion: difficult for first-time applicants to understand the concept and cause larger withdraw rate due to not meeting the funding criteria.

·        Timelines are less clear for applicants: some boards may have an early decision date but other boards may decide later in the year.

·        Less chance to be funded: difficult to demonstrate the specific Local Board benefit in Multi-board Grant application.

·        Delays applicant getting funding: The applicant can only be notified after all applied for local boards made their decision which cause some applicants submitted application to have exceedingly long periods between application and payment.

11.     The wider grants policy is to cancel the Multi-board Grant round in 2024/2025 due to the reasoning listed above, this will lead to better alignment to the local board funding outcomes as the groups will need to clearly demonstrate the direct community benefit in Local Grant process.

12.     By cancelling Multi-board Grant Round and directing the applicants applying to Local Grant Rounds, the board will have a better control and visibility of the grant applications and have greater influence on targeting specific outcomes/areas of focus.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. The new Henderson-Massey Grants Programme has been workshopped with the local board and feedback incorporated into the grants programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Local board grants can contribute to climate action through the support of projects that address food production and food waste; alternative transport methods; community energy efficiency education and behaviour change; build community resilience and support tree planting.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

16.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant council unit will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment, or heritage.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     The grants programme has been developed by the local board to set the direction of its grants programme. This programme is reviewed on an annual basis.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     All grant programmes respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to organisations delivering positive outcomes for Māori. Applicants are asked how their project aims to increase Māori outcomes in the application process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-Term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy. Therefore, there is minimal risk associated with the adoption of the grants programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     An implementation plan is underway, and the local board grants programme will be locally advertised through the local board and council channels, including the council website, local board Facebook page and communication with past recipients of grants.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Henderson-Massey Community Grants Policy 2024-2025

385

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

James Boyd - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 






Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 

Amendment to the 2022-2025 Henderson-Massey Local Board meeting schedule

File No.: CP2024/05401

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to add an extraordinary meeting to the 2022-2025 Henderson-Massey Local Board meeting schedule, so the local board can review public feedback on the draft Regional Land Transport Plan 2024-2034 before providing formal views.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the beginning of 2024, there was a central government delay to the delivery of the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024. This delay has affected the delivery of the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) 2024-2034.

3.       Public engagement data on the RLTP will not be available to local boards until 24 June 2024. Local boards must provide their formal views on the draft RLTP before 3 July 2024 to meet Regional Transport Committee deadlines. These timeframes are outside the local board’s normal meeting cycle.

4.       To enable local boards to consider public engagement data before providing formal views, this report recommends the local board approve an extraordinary meeting to the 2022-2025 Henderson-Massey Local Board meeting schedule. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve an extraordinary meeting of the Henderson-Massey Local Board, to be held at 12.00pm on Tuesday 2 July 2024 at the Henderson-Massey Local Board office, Civic Building, Council Chamber, 1 Smythe Road, Henderson, for the purpose of the local board to provide its formal views on the Regional Land Transport Plan after reviewing public feedback.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

6.       In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·        clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings.

·        sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

7.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board adopted its 2022-2025 business meeting schedule during its Henderson-Massey business meeting.

8.       At the beginning of 2024, there was a central government delay to delivering the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024. This delay has impacted Auckland Transport’s timeframes on delivering the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) 2024-2034.

9.       Public engagement on the draft RLTP will run from 17 May 2024 until mid-June 2024. Auckland Transport will provide a summary of public feedback to local boards on 24 June 2024.

10.     Local boards must provide formal views on the draft RLTP before 3 July 2024 to meet Regional Transport Committee deadlines.

11.     Local boards expect to see public feedback before providing their formal views. Therefore, it is recommended that local boards resolve their formal views on the RLTP after 24 June and before 3 July. These timeframes are outside the board’s normal meeting cycle.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The local board has two choices:

i)          Add the meeting as an addition to the 2022-2025 meeting schedule.

Or,

ii)         Add the meeting as an extraordinary meeting.

13.     For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for these meetings to be scheduled as additions to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. However, there is a risk that if the RLTP timeframes change again or the information is not ready for the meeting, there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled.

14.     For option two, only the specific topic on the RLTP may be considered for which the meeting is being held.

15.     Since there is enough time to meet statutory requirements, staff recommend option two – approving this meeting as an extraordinary meeting, as there are ample meetings to manage usual business in the schedule. This requires a decision of the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     There is no specific impact for the council group from this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     There is no specific impact to mana whenua or mataawaka from this report.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     There is a risk that local board views on the RLTP will not be informed by public feedback. This risk is mitigated if the local board resolves to add an additional or extraordinary meeting after the public feedback data is made available on 24 June 2024.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Staff will implement the preferred process when preparing the business meeting schedule.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Maclean Grindell - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 

Options for voting methods in local elections

File No.: CP2024/06130

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive feedback from local boards on a range of voting method options following the Governing Body’s 27 April 2023 decision asking staff to investigate options of postal, booth or a combination voting method for the 2025 elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Postal voting is the current voting method for Auckland Council elections.

3.       Following the review of the 2022 elections, several short and long-term issues were identified. These include:

·    some eligible voters not receiving voting documents

·    few special voting centres

·    general consequences of a declining postal service

·    general decline in voter turnout.

4.       In March 2023 local boards were asked for their feedback on whether council should move from a ‘postal only’ voting method to a ‘combination’ (postal and booth) voting method. (Attachment A)

·    14 supported combination voting (postal, with booth on election day).

·    One supported postal and online voting.

·    One supported online voting, and booth voting on election day.

·    One supported retaining postal only.

·    Four did not provide feedback on this issue.

5.       In April 2023 the Governing Body supported staff to investigate options of postal, booth or a combination method of voting for the 2025 election. The council can change its voting method through resolution.

6.       Local boards are being consulted on this topic again, as the option for a booth only voting method is now also under consideration.

7.       Staff are investing the feasibility of five options:

·    Option One - postal voting with limited special voting centres (status quo)

·    Option Two - postal voting with more special voting centres (status quo plus)

·    Option Three - booth voting

·    Option Four - combination voting (postal, with booth on election day only)

·    Option Five - combination voting (booth and postal).

8.       The management of postal voting is relatively straightforward. The short-term issues identified at the 2022 election can be remedied through the addition of more special voting centres on election day (status quo plus option).

9.       The management of booth voting is more complex and comes with risks and higher costs. The organisation will need to build capacity to manage a booth voting election with up to 630 voting places, and to hire and train up to 3000 temporary staff.

10.     Booth voting has not been used in local elections since 1992 and the current booth voting regulations have not been tested since that time. No recent policy work has been done to determine if any amendments to the regulations are necessary to ensure their workability in the modern context. The Department of Internal Affairs (DIA) has stated it may be challenging for policy work to be completed and ready for the 2025 local elections.

11.     A combination method will be costly (estimated between $10.7-$17.1 million) with the separate costs for postal and booth operations. Additionally, the close of voting on election day for postal is 12 noon, and 7pm for booth. This could lead to the confusion and frustration of voters.

12.     Staff recommend that the postal voting method should be retained, with an increase of special voting centres to avoid queues on election day (status quo plus option).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback on their preferred voting method provided in this report and on the staff recommendation for the status quo plus option.

Horopaki

Context

13.     Auckland Council appoints an Electoral Officer to conduct its elections for mayor, councillors and local board members. The Electoral Officer also conducts the elections for five licensing trusts. 

14.     The Chief Executive is responsible to the council for “facilitating and fostering representative and substantial elector participation in elections and polls held under the Local Electoral Act 2001”.  For this reason, a small team of seconded, fixed term and sometimes volunteer staff work alongside the Electoral Officer to ensure all eligible voters are well informed and motivated to vote and that voters have a diverse range of candidates to choose from.

15.     The Governing Body can make decisions about specified matters relating to elections, including the voting method.

16.     The Local Electoral Act 2001 allows a council, through resolution, to change the voting method of its elections. The authorised methods are:

·    postal voting (current method)

·    booth voting

·    a combination method.

17.     Attachment B provides details of the different methods of voting. Attachment C provides three flow charts outlining how voters would interact with each of the three distinct voting processes (postal, booth and combination) and how each process interacts with the others.

18.     Online voting is not an option within the Local Electoral Act 2001. The Governing Body has not previously considered a change from postal voting.

19.     Voter turnout has declined from 59 per cent at the first Auckland City Council postal method election (1986), down to 35.5 per cent at the 2022 Auckland Council election.  Although Auckland Council’s result was up 0.3 per cent from the 2019 election it still does not compare favourably with other parts of New Zealand. The average voter turnout at the 2022 elections across local governments was 42 per cent.

20.     An evaluation of the Auckland Council 2022 elections was provided to the Governing Body in April 2023 (Attachment D). This review outlined several short and long-term issues with the postal voting method from Auckland voters including:

·    some voters not receiving voting documents. This is largely because the Electoral Commission have difficulties getting eligible voters to enrol or update their enrolment information when they shift to another residential location. This information needs to be up to date so that eligible voters can receive their voting pack in the mail.

·    the need to travel far for a special voting centre

·    having to queuing at a special voting centre on election day

·    the challenge of voting paper security.

21.     Long-term issues were also identified, including:

·    the declining and costly postal service

·    the general decline in voter turnout.

22.     One of the options in the 2022 evaluation is to consider moving from postal voting to a combination method (postal and booth) at the 2025 election, whereby booths are staffed on election day and do not close until 7pm. Postal voting would be available as has been past practice, closing at 12 noon on election day. Including this option, staff are investigating the feasibility of five options:

·    Option One - postal voting only (status quo)

·    Option Two - postal voting with more special voting centres (‘status quo plus’)

·    Option Three - booth voting only

·    Option Four - combination voting (postal, with booth on election day only)

·    Option Five - combination voting (booth and postal).

23.     The Department of Internal Affairs (DIA), in their 2023 Briefing to the Incoming Minister, has signalled changes to current voting method regulations. They describe the need to modernise a system that ‘relies heavily on traditional postal services and has not kept up with many improvements to parliamentary election processes.’ DIA believe these changes might happen in time for the 2028 elections.

24.     This report provides a staff recommendation that responds to the short-term issues described above and outlines current risks with options that respond to the long-term issues.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Option One – Status quo – postal voting with limited special voting centres

25.     Postal voting is used in every council in New Zealand and is widely supported by Electoral Officers across local governments who are a mixture of both independent and council staff.  It is relatively cost effective, and a system known to those who are involved so there is a high probability of achieving a clear and defensible election result.

26.     It does have some problems however which are contained in Attachment D and noted above which has led to improvements being made in recent years such as the provision of special voting centres.

27.     To overcome people not receiving their voting papers, special voting centres have been used to ensure eligible voters can cast a vote during the electoral period. 

28.     At the 2022 election the eight special voting centres had lines out the door, with some voters queuing on the last hours of the last day.

29.     New Zealand Post have previously advised that postage costs will rise in the order of 30 per cent per annum meaning that the estimate of the 2025 election costs of postage is likely to be around 100 per cent more than the 2022 elections, with mailer printing set to increase by 25 per cent over the same period.

Option Two – Status quo plus – postal voting with more special voting centres

30.     Despite its drawbacks, postal voting is a straightforward and relatively cost-effective method for Auckland Council to administer and has a high likelihood of a clear and defensible election result, compared to booth only voting. A postal voting election, with increased special voting centres would provide a short-term response to some of the issues from the 2022 election. An increase in the number of special voting places (minimum one per local board area) will reduce travel and wait times and ensure those who do not receive or lose their voting documents can easily vote.

Option Three - Booth voting

31.     The main perceived benefit to Auckland Council running booth voting for the next election is that it would be similar to Parliamentary elections which is something that voters are very used to and attracts nationwide media coverage.  Booth voting also would overcome the issue of a declining postal service and address perceptions about postal ballots being stolen and/or misused.

32.     There are some drawbacks however:

·    Booth voting has no provision for voters outside of Auckland. Currently, the Local Electoral Regulations 2001 do not give voters who are overseas and outside of Auckland voters an option to return their vote electronically. DIA has stated that they have started early policy work to allow the return of votes electronically for overseas voters but if any changes are made, they may not be ready for the 2025 local elections.

·    To be comparable to a booth voting experience provided by the Electoral Commission for Parliamentary elections, up to 3000 temporary staff would need to be hired and up to 630 voting places would need to be managed over the voting period. This resource has not been budgeted for. The capacity and capability of the organisation to manage this large undertaking is a risk. The financial and reputational cost to re-run a booth voting election is extremely high.

·    Auckland Council and Independent Election Services (our contracted service provider) have not run a booth voting election before.

·    Voter turnout might be impacted. Dale Ofsoske, the Auckland Council Electoral Officer, suggests there could be up to a 10 per cent decrease in voter turnout. This is based on the last booth voting election undertaken by a local authority in New Zealand, where Hutt City Council adopted booth voting for their 1992 election and achieved a 26 per cent turnout compared to the previous postal voting election where a 45 per cent turnout was achieved.  Although there may be other circumstances relating to that case, it is worth bearing in mind that a shift of this nature has risks.

·    Time taken to cast a vote is not conducive to booth voting.  Voters in a general election have to make only two choices; one for an electorate vote and one party vote. This is in contrast to the number of choices for an Auckland local election where a mayor, councillor, up to nine local board members and five licensing trusts are decided. The regulations state that candidate profiles must be provided when a voting document is issued. The time it will take for voters to review candidate profiles and make their decision could cause long wait times at polling places. This was evidenced at special voting places in 2022.

Options Four and Five - Combination postal and booth voting

33.     The benefits of a combination method, of postal and booth voting, are that these options overcome the known problems of postal and booth voting as follows:

·    a combination voting method provides a process (postal voting) for overseas and outside of Auckland voters with a way to return their votes, which booth voting only does not.

·    a combination voting method, reduces reliance on and responds to the declining postal service, while giving voters more options for casting and returning their votes.

34.     There are additional risks however:

·    The risk with a combination of voting methods is the potential for widespread confusion and frustration. Conveying to voters a combination method, and the different closing times of postal and booth voting, 12 noon and 7pm, respectively, is not straightforward. This could also impact on a later release of election results.

·    Because turnout trends for election methods are mixed, the potential level of confusion could decrease turnout.

·    Managing and running two discrete election method processes (plus special voting) is a capability and capacity risk. Council and independent election providers in New Zealand do not have sufficient experience to run a booth voting election.

·    If systems fail and an election result is not clear, the financial and reputational cost to re-run an election is high (above $10million).

·    The cost of running the postal voting method will have increased by approx. $2.6 million since 2022 by the time council runs the 2025 election, the addition of a booth voting method in addition to postal will further increase costs. This is covered further in the financial analysis section.

Staff recommendation

35.     Staff recommend retaining the postal voting method with an increase in special voting centres (the ‘status quo plus’ option).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

36.     This report discusses booth voting. The climate impact of people travelling to a booth is likely to be mixed, depending on where they are located.

37.     Voting documents for postal and booth method elections rely on the use of paper. A more climate friendly option would be online voting. However, online voting is currently not an authorised voting method in the legislation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.     A decision about the voting method affects how voters elect the mayor, councillors and local board members. It does not have major impacts on the council group.

39.     In some options, libraries and volunteer staff may be engaged. Libraries have been consulted and are able to help. Volunteer staff will be engaged if necessary.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

40.     In March 2023 local boards were asked for their feedback on whether council should move from a ‘postal only’ voting method to a ‘combination’ (postal and booth) voting method.

·    14 supported combination voting (postal, with booth on election day).

·    One supported postal and online voting.

·    One supported online voting, and booth voting on election day.

·    One supported retaining postal only.

·    Four did not provide feedback on this issue.

41.     Local communities have not been consulted regarding voting methods.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

42.     Demographic data shows that turnout for electors of Māori descent was lower than the average turnout. Further analysis conducted by RIMU about who voted in the 2022 local elections suggested that a range of interrelated factors may be contributing to these discrepancies, including:

·    differences in the perceived relevance of local government to the everyday life of different communities

·    differences in family and work commitments and an ability to pay attention to local politics in light of other life priorities

·    the complexity of the local government system and voting process, along with differences in knowledge about local government across communities in Auckland

·    for some communities, a lack of identification with and ability to see one’s identity reflected in the local governance system

·    a distrust of and disengagement from the local government system, particularly amongst Māori

·    the existence of a social norm of non-voting in some families, neighbourhoods and communities.

43.     The impact of a different voting method on Māori voter turnout is not known and difficult to estimate.  This is also true for non-Māori voter turnout.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

44.     Of the options considered, the estimated financial implications run between $10,060,390 and $19,849,574.  Only options One and Two have sufficient budget provided for in the Long-term Plan.  Any other option would require additional funding to be made available by making further trade-offs in another budgetary allocation.

45.     The costs below are estimates. This is especially true for options which include booth voting as not all costs are known.

Option

Description

Cost (estimate)

Option One - Postal voting only (Status quo)

Same as 2022, with 8 special voting centres

$10,060,390

Option Two - Postal voting, plus more special voting centres (Status quo plus)

Same as 2022, with a minimum of one special voting centre per LB

$10,160,390

Option Three - Booth only

20 places per LB, 7 days

$11,377,653

30 places per LB, 7 days

$13,714,734

20 places per LB, 14 days (same voting period as Parliamentary elections)

$15,467,546

30 places per LB, 14 days

$19,849,574

Option Four - Combination: Postal voting, with booth voting on election day

Postal, with 20 places per LB on election day

$10,673,874

Option Five - Combination: Booth and Postal voting

30 places per LB, 7 days

$17,071,634

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

46.     Staff have taken the short-term issues from the findings of the 2022 election to provide a recommendation to maintain postal voting, with more special voting centres (status quo plus).

47.     In consideration of the declining postal service and voter turnout, staff will continue to work with DIA, the Electoral Commission, and other entities to inform policy work for any potential changes for the 2028 elections.

48.     The analysis in the body of this report includes information on the risks of each option and Attachment E describes these in more detail. This analysis shows that Option Two ‘status quo plus’ has the least risks. The risks noted include:

·    voter fraud

·    voter intimidation

·    technical issues

·    long queues and voter suppression

·    misinformation and disinformation

·    security concerns

·    accessibility issues

·    logistical challenges

·    communication of results

·    postal service

·    fit for purpose.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

49.     Your feedback will be provided to the Governing Body in June where a decision on the voting method for the 2025 local elections will be sought.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2022 local board feedback

403

b

Types of voting methods

431

c

Voting method flow charts

435

d

Evaluation of 2022 election method

439

e

Risk analysis

459

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Liam Davies - Graduate

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Rose Leonard - Manager Governance Services

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 





























Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 




Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 





Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 




















Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 





Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 

Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Henderson-Massey Local Board for quarter three 2023/2024

File No.: CP2024/06166

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Henderson-Massey Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter three, 1 January – 31 March 2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2023/2024 work programme.

3.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with Henderson-Massey Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·        The Crime Prevention Funding has been paid to seven organisations. There has been good progress made with this one-off funding from central government. 

·        The 2024 Henderson-Massey Movies in Parks and Come Fly a Kite were successfully delivered in quarter three.

·        The approach to establish a working group and include a local board representative to assist with the development of the Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Plan was proposed at an introductory workshop held with the local board in April.

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). Updated information has been received after quarter three from the following activity (currently reported with a green status):

·        ID 1418: Elevating Participation through new engagement tools: Mana Whenua Engagement: Budget was to enable local board engagement with Te Kawerau ā Maki. Alternative budget is available to organise a joint hui with the three west boards. Budget of $14,000 is available for reallocation. 

·        Film revenue balance of $2,878 to be allocated.

6.       Net operating performance overall for Henderson-Massey local board area is less than one per cent over budget for the nine months ended 31 March 2024. Operating expenditure of $23.4 million is three per cent below budget and operating revenue of $3.7 million running at 16 per cent below planned budget levels. Capital expenditure is approximately 13 per cent above budget for the period.

7.       Funds were set aside for the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) following the drafting of the 2023/2024 work programme. However, due to changes at Tātaki Auckland Unlimited (TAU), approval was delayed. Auckland Council Grants team has now taken on this work. This report provides the opportunity for the local board to approve the Young Enterprise Scheme. (HM) (Activity ID 1262) and associated budget of $2,000 into the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services Work Programme.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter three ending 31 March 2024.

b)      reallocate $16,878 which is available due to underspends and film revenue income to other activities in the 2023/2024 financial year.

c)      approve the transfer of the Young Enterprise Scheme (HM) (Activity ID 1262) and associated budget of $2,000 to the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services Work Programme from the unallocated locally driven initiatives (LDI) operating budget.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board has an approved 2023/2024 work programme for the following:

·        Customer and Community Services;

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·        Local Governance;

·        Plans and Places;

·        Auckland Emergency Management.

9.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

10.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

11.     The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

Key activity updates from quarter three

12.     Local crime prevention fund, safety initiatives investment – Henderson-Massey: Prevention initiatives contributing to reducing youth offending or town centre improvements: The Crime Prevention Funding has been paid to seven organisations and there has been good progress with this one-off funding from central government. A new project under the Crime Prevention allocation called Te Whare Tū Tauā o Aotearoa ki Hoani Waititi Marae is an introductory wānanga for 50 rangatahi to learn Mau Rākau (Māori martial arts) at Hoani Waititi marae. The training will begin in April 2024.

13.     Henderson-Massey Local Board events:  Movies in Parks and Come Fly a Kite were successfully delivered in quarter three. The Movies in Parks event was successfully delivered on 17 February 2024 at Henderson-Park to an estimated audience of 1,800.  The Come Fly a Kite event was successfully delivered on 11 February 2024 at Harbourview-Orangihina Park to an estimated audience of 2,000 attendees who enjoyed a perfect day of kite flying.

14.     Henderson-Massey Local Board, community and business emergency response plans and resilience programme: Increase disaster awareness, response plans and resilience building initiatives in partnership with mana whenua and in collaboration with the Local Board and the community: An introductory workshop was held with the local board in April to establish a working group and include a local board representative to assist with the development of the Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Plan. Interest in the development of the plan was positive and further discussions with the local board are required to nominate a representative for the working group. Next steps are for the drafting of the plan to get underway.

Activities on hold

15.     There are three work programme activities that have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·        ID 22997: Corbans Wine Shop- rebuild heritage building: This project will rebuild the old wine shop which was situated on Great North Road, Henderson, outside Corban Estate. The local board has placed this project on hold.

·        ID 30539: Tui Glen Reserve – refurbish Glen Haven cottage interior: The refurbishment of the interior of Glen Haven cottage is on hold and will recommence in the 2024/2025 financial year.

·        ID 1308: Investigate options to improve Corbans Estate Arts Centre to address fit for purpose, heritage and condition issues (year 2 of 3): Develop a master plan to guide decision making for the future use and investment in Corban Estate Arts Centre: An updated memo was provided to the local board on 9 February 2024 recommending the masterplan be put on hold until the lease with the Trust has been completed. The work programme line should be reinitiated in the 2025/2026 financial year. 

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

16.     These activities are deferred from the current work programme into future years:

·        ID 32087: Harbourview-Orangihina – plant specimen trees: Supply and plant specimen trees to enhance the park’s amenity i.e., fill in trees along Te Atatū Road, clusters of trees at the main park entrance at the Gloria Avenue roundabout and in other areas of the park to provide shade: This project is not being delivered this financial year.

Cancelled activities

17.     These activities are cancelled:

·        ID 31938: Birdwood Road, Ranui – landslide prevention: Regrade and plant the unstable land area to prevent future landslips on the boundary of the reserve and 13 Jacinta Grove: This project is cancelled. The strategic assessment has been completed. The stream bank has stabilised and no work is required.

·        ID 40226: Henderson-Massey – remediate storm damaged assets: Remediate damage to assets that have been affected by storm and cyclone damage: Project cancelled and merged with ID 30183 Henderson-Massey – renew paths and structures 2024-2026.

Activities with significant issues

18.     The following work programme activities require budget reallocation:

·        ID 1418: Elevating Participation through new engagement tools: Mana Whenua Engagement: This quarter was focused on Auckland Council’s long-term plan consultation. This consultation process had its own budget and no money was spent from this line. Staff started to look at what the first Rangatira ki te Rangatira hui with Te Kawerau ā Maki (mana whenua) would look like. Alternative budget is available to organise a joint hui with the three west boards and will be delivered in the next quarter. Budget of $14,000 is available for reallocation.

·        Film revenue balance of $2,878 to be allocated.

Young Enterprise Scheme (YES)

19.     The Henderson-Massey Local Board has previously funded the Young Enterprise Scheme (HM) (Activity ID 1262) as part of Tātaki Auckland Unlimited’s (TAU) 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 financial years’ work programme.

20.     Due to changes at TAU the approval of the Young Enterprise Scheme (HM) (Activity ID 1262) into financial year 2023/2024 work programmes was delayed while an alternative team to manage the activity was agreed upon.

21.     The responsibility within the Council for the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) has now been re-allocated from Tātaki Auckland Unlimited to Auckland Council Grants team.

22.     The YES event was delivered by the Auckland Business Chamber on behalf of the Young Enterprise Trust in quarter three.

23.     The proposed budget for the Young Enterprise Scheme (HM) (Activity ID 1262) was $2,000 of the boards locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount remains unallocated and can be accommodated from within the local board’s total budget for 2023/2024.

24.     This report provides the opportunity for the local board to approve the Young Enterprise Scheme (HM) (Activity ID 1262) and associated budget of $2,000 into the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services Work Programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

26.     Work programmes were approved in June 2023 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

27.     The local board is currently investing in a number of sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level. These include:

·        ID 571: Climate Action Activator Henderson-Massey: Continues to progress a work programme that will identify initiatives and priorities that support local climate action that contributes towards achieving objectives and outcomes outlined in the Henderson-Massey Climate Action Plan:Whakarauora Āhuarangi: During quarter three, the Climate Action Activator helped Te Taiao Te Atatū secure council Storm Resilience grant funding to engage with the community about ongoing climate actions and encouraged and supported sustainable transport-related activities.

·        ID 569: Kaitiaki Project – Pā Harakeke: Multi-year initiative to develop and deliver environmental projects with Māori communities in the Henderson-Massey local board area: Te Waipuna Puawai continue to work with council staff to progress a landowner approval application to extend the leased area of the pā harakeke site to include a māra kai (community food garden) and have secured regional Auckland Climate funding to enable development of a māra kai at Te Rangi Hiroa Park.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the local board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     This report informs the Henderson-Massey Local Board of the performance for quarter three ending 31 March 2024.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     Kaitiaki Project – Pā Harakeke: Multi-year initiative to develop and deliver environmental projects with Māori communities in the Henderson-Massey local board area to enhance both environment and wellbeing: Installation of the pā harakeke (flax garden) at Te Rangi Hiroa Park was completed in quarter three by Māori-led community organisation Te Waipuna Puawai (formally Te Ukaipo). Approximatey 50 people attended an opening celebration event on 14 February 2024, including Birdwood School students, Te Waipuna Puawai staff and board members, representatives from local community organisations, Auckland Council staff and Henderson-Massey Local Board members. Te Waipuna Puawai has secured regional Auckland Climate Grant funding to enable development of a māra kai at Te Rangi Hiroa Park and are currently working with council staff to progress a landowner approval application and extend the leased area of the pā harakeke site.

31.     Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Tranche Three Henderson-Massey Local Board: Māori naming (and associated story telling) of parks and places in partnership with mana whenua to highlight and promote Auckland’s Māori identity and use of te reo Māori. One iwi is having elections for their governing committee and Chair in April. This means that final sign off for the shared interests phase will not be completed till after the election. This still allows enough time for completion of this phase prior to June as planned.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     This report is provided to enable the Henderson-Massey Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2023/2024 work programme. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

33.     The proposed budget for the Young Enterprise Scheme (HM) (Activity ID 1262) is $2,000 and can be funded from the local board’s available locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget 2023/2024.

Financial Performance

·    Operating expenditure of $23.4 million is $612,000 below budget overall. This is mainly due to lower maintenance /operating costs for community and parks assets. Locally Driven initiatives (LDI) programmes are $26,000 below budget due to timing of delivery.

·    Operating revenue of $3.7 million is $695,000 below budget. This is mainly as a result of lower visitor numbers from leisure and aquatics at West Wave Aquatic facility due to its closure while storm damage work repairs have been done.

·    Capital Expenditure of $12.7 million is over budget by $1.5 million. This is mainly due to work on Te Whau pathway (Section 5), the renewal of plant storm damage at West Wave Aquatic Centre and Kelston Community Centre/Te Pae o Kura renewal ahead of schedule.

·    The financial report for the nine months ended 31 March 2024 for the Henderson Massey local board area is in Appendix B.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

35.     The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

36.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter four (30 June 2024).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A HM Q3 WP Update

471

b

Attachment B HM Operating Performance Financial Summary

507

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Michelle Knudsen - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 





































Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 






Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 

Reporting back decisions under delegation

File No.: CP2024/05682

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To report back a decision of the Henderson-Massey Local Board made under delegation to provide feedback to inform Auckland Council submissions.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 6 December 2022 the Henderson-Massey Local Board delegated authority to the local board Chairperson to submit the local board's formal views for inclusion in Auckland Council submissions to Central Government, select committees and other councils, where this feedback is due before a local board meeting (resolution number HM/2022/160) as follows:

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      tautapa / delegate authority to the Chair to approve and submit the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils.

b)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that the local board can continue to use its urgent decision process to approve and submit the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils, if the Chair chooses not to exercise the delegation sought in recommendation (a).

c)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that this delegation will only be exercised where the timeframes do not allow for local board input to be considered and approved at a local board meeting.

d)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note all local input approved and submitted for inclusion in an Auckland Council submission is to be included on the next local board meeting agenda for the public record.

3.       On 12 April 2024, the Chairperson signed off under delegation feedback from the Henderson-Massey Local Board for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on the Fast-track Approvals Bill.

4.       The government introduced the Fast-track Approvals Bill under urgency on 7 March 2024. The Bill is with the Environment Select Committee; submissions closed on 19 April 2024. The Bill can be found here: Fast-track Approvals Bill 31-1 (2024), Government Bill Contents – New Zealand Legislation

5.       Council staff prepared a draft submission for consideration of the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee.

6.       One of the government’s goals is to introduce a broader, permanent, fast-track consenting regime to replace the temporarily retained fast-track regime of the repealed Natural and Built Environment Act 2023 (NBEA). The Bill is part of the coalition agreement between National and NZ First and is a key component of the government’s 100 Day Plan.

7.       The government intends to facilitate infrastructure and major projects with significant regional or national benefits. The government contends that consenting major projects takes too long and is too expensive. It refers to a recent report by the Infrastructure Commission, which shows that the cost of consenting infrastructure projects has increased by 70 per cent since 2014, and the time taken to get consent has increased by 150 per cent over the same period.

8.       No evidence has been supplied in support of extending fast-track consenting to the broader types of approvals enabled under other Acts, or costs / delays with these approvals, and RMA-consents unrelated to infrastructure.

9.       The government retained the fast-track consenting process for specified infrastructure and housing activities in December 2023, while repealing the previous government’s resource management legislation. The retained NBEA fast-track consenting process has been available for resource consents, and notices of requirement to designate land, from 24 August 2023. Applications lodged within the transitional period (August to December) must continue to be processed and determined under the repealed Act.

10.     The Fast-track Approvals Bill’s process is similar to the COVID-19 Recovery (Fast-track Consenting) Act 2020 (FTCA), in that projects could be fast-tracked by being listed in the legislation, or by a referral decision. The FTCA enabled resource consent applications and notices of requirement only and was in force for a set time period.

11.     A memo was circulated on 9 April 2024 that sets out initial areas of focus that will inform the council’s submission including:

a)      natural justice and loss of local voice: no transparency regarding listed projects tobe fast-tracked; Auckland’s prohibited activity rules can be set aside; little involvement for local authorities on significant applications; peri-urban projects may be enabled contrary to council’s Future Development Strategy, and impact on Local Government Act budgeting and infrastructure financing and growth decisions.

b)      risk of unplanned development reliant on council infrastructure for which there is no financing with consequential financial and level of service impacts with governance decisions required.

c)      poor environmental outcomes: proposal to enable multiple approval types under standalone legislation is unsupported by evidence / analysis and relevant statutory considerations are secondary to the Bill’s sole fast-tracking project facilitation purpose. The Bill is likely to enable significant negative impacts on environmental outcomes with little public or independent oversight and accountability.

d)      range of matters subject to further analysis by the council’s submission project team.

12.     The deadline for local board feedback to be appended to the final Auckland Council submission was 17 April 2024.

13.     Submissions to the Environment Select Committee on the Bill closed on 19 April 2024.

14.     Henderson-Massey Local Board’s feedback is appended as Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the decision made under delegation 12 April 2024 providing feedback from the Henderson-Massey Local Board for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on the Fast-track Approvals Bill.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Henderson-Massey Local Board feedback

517

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Laura Hopkins - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 







Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 

Chair's Report - Chris Carter

 

File No.: CP2024/05392

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on projects, meetings, and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local board members are responsible for leading policy development in their areas of interest, proposing and developing project concepts, overseeing agreed projects within budgets, being active advocates, accessing and providing information and advice.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive Chair Chris Carter’s May 2024 report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair Chris Carter’s report - May 2024

525

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Laura Hopkins - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa (Policy Schedule)

 

File No.: CP2024/05393

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Henderson-Massey Local Board Hōtaka Kaupapa (Policy Schedule).

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa (Policy Schedule) was previously the governance forward work programme calendar for the Henderson-Massey Local Board (Attachment A). The policy schedule is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The policy schedule aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·     ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·     clarifying what advice is expected and when

·     clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The policy schedule also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Hōtaka Kaupapa (Policy Schedule) for May 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Henderson-Massey Local Board Hōtaka Kaupapa (Policy Schedule) - May 2024

529

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Laura Hopkins - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 

Confirmation of Workshop Records

 

File No.: CP2024/05394

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present records of workshops held by the Henderson-Massey Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Briefings/presentations provided at the workshops held are as follows:

2 April 2024

1.   Draft Parks and Community Facility 2024/2025 to 2026/2027 Capex Work Programme

2.   Local Board Annual Planning workshop 6 - Local Board Work Programme

 

9 April 2024

1.   Eke Panuku - Wai Horotiu Connection Henderson

2.   Community Delivery Libraries and Hub teams quarterly update

3.   Readiness and Response Plan

4.   Passenger Rail between Swanson and Kumeū

5.   Work Programme saving opportunities discussion

 

30 April 2024

1.   Local Board Annual Planning workshop 8 – Fees and Charges, Annual Budget consultation feedback and Regional input

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      note the workshop records for 2, 9 and 30 April 2024.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Henderson-Massey Local Board workshop records for 2, 9 and 30 April 2024.

533

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Laura Hopkins - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 





 


 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

21 May 2024

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board

a)      whakaae / agree to exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Henderson-Massey Local Board feedback on Pools and Leisure Contract Model

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report relates to ongoing contract negotiations and should remain confidential until August, to ensure the awarding of contracts has been completed prior

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.