I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Albert-Eden Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 23 May 2024

10.00am

Albert-Eden Local Board Office
114 Dominion Road
Mt Eden

 

Albert-Eden Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Kendyl Smith

 

Deputy Chairperson

Margi Watson

 

Members

José Fowler

 

 

Julia Maskill

 

 

Christina Robertson

 

 

Liv Roe

 

 

Rex Smith

 

 

Jack Tan

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

 

17 May 2024

 

Contact Telephone: +64 21 809 149

Email: michael.mendoza@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                                                        5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                                         5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                         5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                    5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                                                            5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                                                                                       5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                                                                                5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Nick Sautner – The Eden Park Trust                                           5

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                                                      6

9.1     Public Forum - Mt Eden Community Patrol Update to the Albert-Eden Local Board                                                                                                                     6

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                                              7

11        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Albert-Eden Local Board for quarter three 2023/2024                                                                                                9

12        Albert-Eden Quick Response Round Two, Multiboard Round Two 2023/2024 and the Accommodation Support Fund 2024 grant allocations                                          59

13        Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grant for 2024/2025                                                                                                                                       81

14        Great North Road Dynamic Bus Lane Local Board Feedback                             103

15        Central Crosstown Bus Changes – Local Board Feedback                                 109

16        Local government elections 2025 – order of names on voting documents       123

17        Albert-Eden Local Board feedback into the Auckland Council's submission to the Fast-track Approvals Bill                                                                                          141

18        Local board appointment to Emergency Readiness and Response Forum       157

19        Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors' Updates                                           165

20        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                175

21        Board Members' Reports                                                                                          177

22        Hōtaka Kaupapa/Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar                   185

23        Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Records                                                        191

24        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

25        Te Mōtini ā-Tukanga hei Kaupare i te Marea | Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public        205

C1       Albert-Eden Local Board feedback on Pools and Leisure Contract Model        205

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)         whakaū / confirm the minutes of its ordinary meeting held on Thursday, 2 May 2024, as true and correct.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Albert-Eden Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Nick Sautner – The Eden Park Trust

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for Nick Sautner – Chief Executive Officer, The Eden Park Trust, to deliver a presentation during the Deputation segment of the business meeting.

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Nick Sautner – Chief Executive Officer, The Eden Park Trust, will be in attendance to provide the local board with a brief general overview of The Eden Park Trust’s Eden Park 2.1 Plan, including an overview of the proposed changes to the Trust’s resource consent framework.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      thank Nick Sautner – Chief Executive Officer, The Eden Park Trust, for his attendance and Deputation presentation regarding a general overview of The Eden Park Trust’s Eden Park 2.1 Plan and a brief overview of the proposed changes to the Trust’s resource consent framework.

 

 

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Mt Eden Community Patrol Update to the Albert-Eden Local Board

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for José Fowler – chairperson, Mt Eden Community Patrol, to deliver a presentation during the Public Forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       José Fowler, in his capacity as chairperson for the Mt Eden Community Patrol, will be in attendance to deliver a presentation regarding the group’s recent activities and outline how it has spent the grant support received from the local board in April 2022.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      thank José Fowler – chairperson, Mt Eden Community Patrol, for his attendance and presentation outlining the community group’s activities and how it has spent the grant support received from the Albert-Eden Local Board in April 2022.

 

 

 

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Albert-Eden Local Board for quarter three 2023/2024

File No.: CP2024/06397

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Albert-Eden Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter three, 1 January – 31 March 2024

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2023/2024 work programme.

3.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with Albert-Eden Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·    A total of 34 Neighbour Day events were funded by the local board and took part in March 2024 through the Neighbours Day Grants Programme (ID 86).

·    Climate Action Programme (ID 534): Highlights include funding secured for four projects through the Auckland Climate Grant, $5,000 towards an E-bike instructor for locals to try an e-bike, $15,000 toward the Waterview Wheels School Bike Train project, $10,000 towards the Albert-Eden Puketāpapa Eco Festival and $12,000 towards the Climate Change Action for Seniors project.

·    2,240 volunteer hours were contributed through the Ecological and Environmental Volunteers Programme (ID 520).

·    81 volunteer hours were contributed through the Bike Hub - Albert-Eden Programme (ID 538) at the Tumeke Cycle Space Bike Hub.

·    Citizenship ceremonies Albert-Eden (ID 71): the Civic Events team delivered one citizenship ceremony in quarter three, with 165 people from the local board area becoming new citizens.

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged).

6.       The financial performance report is attached. There are some points for the local board to note:

·    Net operating performance overall for the Albert-Eden local board area is 2 per cent below budget for the nine months ended 31 March 2024. Operating revenue is 18 per cent above budget and operating expenditure is close to budget. Capital expenditure is 16 per cent below year-to-date budget.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter three ending 31 March 2024.

b)      reallocate $1,250 Locally-driven Initiative (LDI) operating expenditure from Anzac services Albert-Eden (ID 72) to Community grants (ID 76).

c)      note the reallocation of $ 177,438.66 Asset-based Service renewals expenditure to Windmill Park – renew- park building (ID 19901), from the following budget sources:

i)        Mt Albert War Memorial Hall- renew - interior and exterior (ID 30118)

ii)       Community leased buildings - renew - building and fittings Albert-Eden (ID 30322)

iii)      Raymond Street No19 – renew – building (ID 39606).

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Albert-Eden Local Board has an approved 2023/2024 work programme for the following:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Plans and Places

·        Auckland Emergency Management.

8.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

9.       The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

 

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

10.     The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes.

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

Key activity updates from quarter three

Outcome 1: Resilient, connected and empowered communities who value diversity

11.     Arts and events brokering (ID 58): during this quarter, four projects were successfully completed. These included Indian Film Night which took place on 8 March at The Capitol Cinema with approximately 8 teams of filmmakers and actors involved and 90 attendees; Dragon Day 2024 held on 23 March with approximately 200 community members in attendance, and included traditional Lion Dance along Dominion Road, amongst other activities. This event was organised and part-funded by the Dominion Road Business Association.

12.     Build Capacity: Network and community connection coordinator (ID 57): An Eden-Epsom Community Network meeting was held on 13 March at the Epsom Community Centre, attended by over 55 individuals representing 38 diverse organisations and groups. Additionally, the coordinator supported a funding workshop on ‘Structuring your community group for sustainability’ at the Epsom Community Centre prior to the network meeting. The coordinator also assisted the Greenwoods Corner Business Association in delivering activities for the Albert-Eden & Puketāpapa Eco Festival. These included the Greenwoods Corner Bike Extravaganza events in the 'Village Square' organised alongside Roskill Bike Hub, and Albert-Eden Climate Action Network's 'Try an E Bike' event.

13.     Community grants (ID 76): There have not been any rounds in this quarter. But by the time of writing this report, the Local Grants have been approved in April 2024, leaving a small budget for the rest of the grants to be decided in May 2024. Therefore, staff are recommending reallocating locally driven initiative operating expenditure available to this line.

Outcome 2: Neighbourhoods that reflect and value our heritage and unique identity now and into the future

14.     Local Māori aspirations (ID 60): the following Initiatives were funded in partnership with the Arts Broker programme:

·        He Mauri by Dr Rangihiroa Panoho: Works are nearly complete, and the exhibition is in its final stages of planning. With an opening to be held on 5 April 2024.

·        Pā Harakeke:  There was an initial Waananga followed by three sessions making harakeke place mats. This was open to the wider community, with kai following cultural custom. A contemporary harakeke decoration workshop was also held and popular with both group members and the wider community.

15.     Anzac services Albert-Eden (ID 72): Planning for these events is underway. Events to be delivered in April 2024. Note: the Epsom RSA Anzac event has been cancelled and the funding of $1,250 is now available for reallocation.

Outcome 3: High-quality natural environments and sustainable lifestyles

16.     Albert-Eden Ecological and Environmental Volunteers Programme (ID 520): 2,240 volunteer hours of pest plant and animal work were completed across 8 groups. Plantings are planned for the next quarters in Roy Tree Clements Tree way, and along Te Auaunga Awa. Contractors were employed to conduct pest plant control in Watea Reserve and Eric Armishaw Reserve. Schools have also been engaged in the area including Auckland Grammar and Auckland Normal Intermediate and plans are underway to plant with them in Windmill Park in the following quarters.

17.     Te Auaunga / Oakley Creek pest plant control buffer programme (ID 522):  Work on this project continued in the new year and is now complete. The project has progressed to plan with the contractor continuing to work closely the community group Friends of Oakley Creek to identify key properties and areas where engagement would be most useful. To date 102 properties have been visited and 252 square meters of pest plants have been controlled, including moth plant, woolly nightshade, jasmine, madeira vine, climbing asparagus, blue morning glory and Japanese honeysuckle.

Outcome 4: A strong local economic with thriving town centres

18.     Placemaking: Thriving town centre local placemaking (ID 61):

·        Dominion Road - Balmoral: The Cross-Cultural Specialist has been supporting the Dominion Road Business Association and Balmoral Chinese Business Association to plan and develop their calendar, establishing base KPIs for the Business Liaison and brainstorming of promotion and marketing ideas; facilitating the delivery of the Safer Plates event and coordinating with Community Patrols to plan for two additional events; developing the project framework for an Ethnic Precinct gateway design competition and reviewing the 2024 Dominion Road Moon Festival.

·        Mt Albert: A new Town Centre Business Liaison was appointed in January 2024. Staff and the Cross-Cultural Specialist are supporting them to understand and fulfil the role's requirements.  They distributed an Autumn newsletter, covering updates on Auckland Transport and Auckland Council public consultations, and a Coffee with a Cop event planned with the NZ police team and Community Patrols.

·        Pt. Chevalier: The Neighbourhood Connector (PCNC) has compiled a database of key stakeholders.  In March, they circulated an online newsletter with a safety focus. The PCNC supported the Community Patrols NZ and the NZ Police team to organise a Coffee with a Cop event hosted at a local business, in the town centre, offering residents an opportunity to raise questions and safety concerns with the police. The PCNC assisted in the coordination of the Pt. Chevalier End of Summer Party in the Square on 23 March, organised by Learning at the Point, Pt Chevalier Community Centre, and Pt. Chevalier Little Library.

·        Staff also met with the Greenwoods Corner Business Association to identify projects and available support. Following this, a funding agreement of $10,000 has been processed.

Outcome 5: Parks and community facilities meet a wide range of needs

19.     Albert-Eden Full Facilities maintenance contracts (ID 939): the audit score for this quarter is above 90 per cent indicating a slight improvement on the contractor’s performance compared to the previous quarter. This is in spite of an increase in the overall number of requests for service being raised. There has been a concerning rise in incidents of vandalism and streetscape plants being stolen, this makes up nearly half of all recorded vandalism incidents this quarter. There has also been an increase in incidents involving intentional damage to our public toilets as well as an increase in graffiti. Despite these challenges, the contractor have been promptly responding to incidents and maintaining our gardens and streetscape areas.

20.     Albert-Eden - remediate 2023 storm and cyclone damaged assets (ID 40223): removal of bridge, tree and other debris from stream bed complete. Joint operation between Regional Arboriculture team, Healthy Waters and Area operations team. Next steps: Complete remedial works to two damage structures, complete optioneering to replace missing structures.

Outcome 6: Safe, easy and sustainable options for moving around

21.     Bike hub (ID 538):  During the quarter to date, Tumeke Cycle Space has had 46 visitors, 81 volunteer hours and has fixed 39 bikes. Three bikes were rescued from the waste stream and three bikes were sold to the community. Tumeke successfully recruited three new volunteers during the quarter increasing total rostered volunteers to 16. The Cycle Space participated in the Gribblehirst Summer Festival, fixing attendees bikes. Process improvements have been a focus for the quarter including setting up volunteer induction documents and confirming bike sale processes.

Activities on hold

22.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·        ID 17736: LDI minor upgrades – community facilities – this project is on hold due to the confirmation of the design being ongoing with stakeholders.

·        ID 3674: Community Lease – View Road Reserve – Ending Child Poverty and Trafficking – this activity will be progressed in quarter four once renovation work on the building has been completed.

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

23.     These activities are deferred from the current work programme into future years:

·        ID 20586: Morvern Reserve Concept Plan – progress delivery - This project is on hold and has been deferred to the 2025/2026 financial year.

·        ID 36656: Aberfoyle Street – new – link pedestrian path – this project is on hold and deferred to future years until funding is available.

·        ID 1303: Albert-Eden Local Parks Management Plan – this project has been deferred.

·        ID 3170: Community Lease – 18-20 Huia Road, Point Chevalier – this site is part of a wider scope of work being undertaken by the Service Investment and Planning team. No lease will be progressed until the future use of the site has been progressed.

Activities with changes

24.     The following projects have changes which been communicated to the board via Memo on 15 April 2024.

25.     These are Risk Adjusted Programme projects that have been approved by the board in July 2023 as per the resolution number AE/2023/98.

Table 1: Risk Adjusted Projects with changes

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

Activity Name

Summary of Change

19901

Customer and Community Services

Windmill Park - renew - buildings rebuild

The renewal of the Windmill Park pavilion encountered a number of unexpected issues that were not visible until the demolition aspects of the project begun, and the bones of the building were exposed.

 

Within the overall contract there are 39 variations that contribute to the overall total of $367,061.66. An application to the central risk fund was approved to fund $189,623, the balance of $177,438.66 to be funded from the local board.

30118

Customer and Community Services

Mount Albert War Memorial Hall – renew- interior and exterior

This Risk Adjusted Project has experienced delays and has budget available in future years.

Therefore, $96,394.10 has been reallocated to ID 19901.

 

 

30332

Customer and Community Services

Community leased buildings – renew- building and fittings

This Risk Adjusted Project has experienced delays and has budget available in future years.

Therefore, $71,044.56 has been reallocated to ID 19901.

 

39606

Customer and Community Services

Raymond Street No17 (ex Lions Club building) – renew – building

This Risk Adjusted Project has experienced delays and has budget available in future years.

Therefore, $10,000.00 has been reallocated to ID 19901.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

27.     Work programmes were approved in June 2023 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

28.     The local board is currently investing in a number of sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level. These include:

·        ID 534: Climate Action Programme: this three-year community climate action programme will support implementation of impactful community-based climate change actions for the Albert-Eden local board area. This year’s activity will include ongoing support for a Local Climate Activator and investment to amplify community climate action.

·        ID 535: EcoNeighbourhoods: EcoNeighbourhood comprises groups of six or more neighbours from different households within the local board area, with the objective of adopting sustainable, low carbon practices and increasing resilience within their homes, lifestyles and neighbourhoods.

·        ID 538: Bike Hub: this project will continue to support the operations of the Tumeke Cycle Space Bike Hub established at Gribblehirst Park in 2018/2019.

·        ID 68: Placemaking: Community-led placemaking in community gardens - a community organisation co-ordinates a network of community gardens, connects with eco-neighbourhoods, low carbon initiatives and ecological restoration projects, responds to new garden initiatives and provides seed funding to the network to share materials and expertise.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the local board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     This report informs the Albert-Eden Local Board of the performance for quarter three ending 31 March 2024.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     The local board’s work programme contains a number of projects which provide direct outcomes for Māori, such as:

·        ID 60: Local Māori Aspirations - increased connection with mana whenua and mataawaka highlights opportunities for collaboration on projects and programmes of interest and benefit to local Māori. This work includes ongoing partnerships to provide guided Hikoi on Maungawhau and connection to diverse communities to increase their understanding of Te Ao Māori and Tikanga.

·        ID 63: Local implementation of Ngā Hapori Momoho (Thriving Communities) councils social wellbeing strategy Albert-Eden Local Board - this activity will have a strong focus on supporting Māori-led initiatives, including empowering individuals, whānau and communities to influence decisions, take action and make change happen in their communities.

·        ID 1078: Library services: libraries provide services and programmes to promote te reo Māori and access to information on Māori culture and history.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     This report is provided to enable the Albert-Eden Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2023/2024 work programme.

33.     Reallocation of funding is regarded as a prudent step for the local board to take in order to optimise its local driven initiative operating budget expenditure for the 2023/2024 financial year.

Financial Performance

34.     For the 9 months ended 31 March 2024:

·     Operating expenditure of $12.0 million is on budget for the last nine months with both the Asset-based Services (ABS) actual spend of $11.0 million and the Locally-driven Initiatives (LDI) actual spend of $1.0m, tracking to plan.

·     Operating revenue of $2.0 million is $310,000 above budget mainly due to entrance fees and lease income.

·     Capital expenditure of $2.1 million is under budget by $393,000 mainly due to underspend in the Local Board Transport Capital Fund. Priority One projects under this fund were not allocated by the Board until November 2023.

·     The financial report for the nine months ended 31 March 2024 for Albert-Eden local board area is in Attachment B.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

36.     The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

37.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter four (30 June 2024).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board - 1 January – 31 March 2024 Work Programme Update

19

b

Albert-Eden Local Board - Operating Performance Financial Summary

53

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Canela Ferrara – Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 



Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 



































Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 






Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Albert-Eden Quick Response Round Two, Multiboard Round Two 2023/2024 and the Accommodation Support Fund 2024 grant allocations

File No.: CP2024/04539

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Albert-Eden Quick Response Round Two 2023/2024, the Multiboard Round Two 2023/2024 and the Albert-Eden Accommodation Support Fund 2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Albert-Eden Local Board adopted the Albert-Eden Local Board Community Grants Programme 2023/2024 on 22 June 2023 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

3.       This report presents applications received for the for Albert-Eden Quick Response Round Two 2023/2024 (Attachment B), the Multiboard Round Two 2023/2024 (Attachment C) and the Albert-Eden Accommodation Support Fund 2024 (Attachment D).

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $140,500 for the 2023/2024 financial year. A total of $137,203 was allocated in the previous grant rounds. This leaves a total of $3,297 to be allocated to one quick response and one multiboard round.

5.       Twenty-five applications were received for Quick Response Round Two 2023/2024, requesting a total of $67,201.60 and twenty-three applications were received for Multiboard Round Two 2023/2024 requesting a total of $164,433.11.

6.       The Albert-Eden Local Board has set a total accommodation budget of $136,334 for the 2023/2024 financial year, with one grant round.

7.       Thirty-five applications were received for the Albert-Eden Accommodation Support Fund 2024, requesting a total of $444,136.44.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Albert-Eden Quick Response Round Two 2023/2024 listed in the following table:   

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2401-201

Mobility Assistance Dogs Trust

Community

Towards the Client Placement Coordinator's salary.

$5,000.00

Ineligible

QR2401-202

The Disabled Citizens Society Incorporated

Community

Towards repairing the building facia.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-203

Mt Albert Baptist Church

Community

Towards games hire, bouncy castle hire, toys, and game purchase for the "Glow Night" on 31 October 2024.

$2,000.00

Ineligible

QR2401-206

Asthma New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards the purchase and free distribution of "MDI (Metered Dose Inhaler) spacers & Asthma Emergency information brochures" to people with respiratory disease.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-207

Peers Group Limited - Taufa Oliveti

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of producing a web/social media series showcasing local creatives and business owners around Auckland, including the hireage of audio equipment, lighting, camera, and rig.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-208

Mt Albert Ladies Rebus Club

Community

Towards the annual hireage cost of Ferndale House and Central Bowling Club for the Mt Albert Ladies Rebus Club monthly meetings.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-209

Road Safety Education Limited

Community

Towards the venue hire, day manager and facilitators' costs to deliver the “Road Safety” programme for 60 youths from the Mt Albert Grammar School.

$1,890.00

Eligible

QR2401-211

Sustain & Enable Limited

Community

Towards the cost of delivering two "Energy Advice" workshops, from 1 June 2024 to 31 May 2025, including the cost of wages, lightbulbs, venue hire, catering, travel, promotion, and facilitation.

$3,135.00

Eligible

QR2401-213

The Ranfurly Veterans' Trust

Community

Towards the cost of furniture and marque hire for hosting the Anzac Day Commemoration Service on 25 April 2024.

$5,000.00

Ineligible

QR2401-214

Auckland Netball Centre Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase and installation of a new lockable community notice board to be placed on the building at Windmill Park.

$1,482.00

Ineligible

QR2401-215

Move and Act

Community

Towards the cost of hosting "Capacity Building Development Mechanism" workshops, including the costs of catering, certificate of appreciation and facilitators fees.

$1,800.00

Eligible

QR2401-216

The Religious Diversity Centre in Aotearoa New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards venue hire, catering, gift vouchers, printing and stationery for the "Central Auckland Leadership in Diversity" workshop at the Unitec Marae on 29 August 2024.

$1,500.00

Eligible

QR2401-222

Learning At The Point Community Kindergarten Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of hosting a "Matariki" event on 27 June 2024, including the costs of entertainment, hiring of Ferris wheel, popcorn, and candy floss machines, face painting, and a dome to be turned into a Whare.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-224

The Upside Downs Education Trust

Community

Towards the speech-language therapy fees for nine children with Down Syndrome in the local board area.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-225

Point Chevalier Croquet Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of three battery sprayers for the three croquet lawns of the Club.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-226

Somkiwi Wellbeing Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of venue hire, catering, flyers, DJ, hats, t-shirts, and sign board.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-227

MyLaunchPad Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the purchase of an interactive display whiteboard for their mental resilience training programme.

$2,500.00

Ineligible

QR2401-228

Grow New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards digital marketing cost.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-229

Momentum Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the cost of delivering four one-day life and financial skills programmes to 20 at-risk individuals at the Mt Eden Probation Centre.

$1,695.00

Ineligible

QR2401-230

Aotearoa Resettled Community Coalition Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of hosting the "Resettled Community Soccer Tournament" at the Mt Albert Community and Leisure Centre, including the costs of gift cards, volunteer vouchers, referee vouchers, catering, trophies, staffing costs, travel, and venue hire.

$2,999.60

Eligible

QR2401-233

Julieta Janet Guassardi

Arts and culture

Towards tutor's cost.

$6,000.00

Ineligible

QR2401-234

Epilepsy Association of New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards the educator's fuel and telecommunication costs for support services for people living with epilepsy.

$500.00

Eligible

QR2401-235

Gribblehirst Community Hub Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the purchase of equipment for the "Arts on Stage" project.

$2,700.00

Ineligible

QR2401-236

Jolisa Gracewood

Community

Towards the cost of printing, content creation, design and installation of signage including project delivery contingencies for the "Pt Chev on wheels – past, present and future" project.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR2401-237

Action Education Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the facilitator fees, travel, administration, equipment, and resources to deliver 12 workshops in the Albert-Eden area.

$3,000.00

Ineligible

Total

 

 

 

$67,201.60

 

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received in Multiboard Round Two 2023/2024, listed in Table Two below:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2324-206

Unity Community Foundation

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire, sports gear, office lease, sports trainers’ wages, office lease, computers, kitchenware, administrative expenses, furniture, and CEO salary, for establishing sport and recreation hubs across Auckland.

$15,000.00

Ineligible

MB2324-207

Body Positive Incorporated

Community

Towards billstickers, printing costs, Facebook advertising, and film making costs.

$4,890.00

Eligible

MB2324-2102

YMCA North Incorporated

Community

Towards crew programme & event delivery costs for Raise Up youth development programme from 1 June 2024 to 31 May 2025.

$8,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-216

Age Concern Auckland Trust

Community

Towards wages at 57 Rosebank Road from 1 May 2024 to 30 April 2025.

$4,076.00

Eligible

MB2324-217

NZ Council of Victim Support Groups

Community

Towards overall operational expenses.

$8,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-218

New Zealand Eid Day Trust Board

Events

Towards venue hire, entertainment, games, operations, marketing, and misc. costs for NZ Eid Al Adha 2024 at Eden Park Stadium.

$8,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-221

The Operating Theatre Trust trading as Tim Bray Theatre Company

Arts and culture

Towards ticket cost for disabled or disadvantaged children to attend “Mrs. Wishy Washy” show from 21 September 2024 to 26 October 2024.

$4,891.50

Eligible

MB2324-224

The Re-Creators Limited

Community

Towards cost of rent, tools, equipment, admin, tutor, project management, marketing to deliver Community DIY skills-based upcycling workshops from 1 May 2024 to 27 September 2024.

$4,725.00

Ineligible

MB2324-225

The Yes And Trust

Arts and culture

Towards Education Manager salary to deliver "The Resilience Playground" project from 1 May 2024 to 30.

$14,520.00

Ineligible

MB2324-231

Every Body is a Treasure Charitable Trust

Community

Towards facilitator costs from 1 April 2024 to 28 February 2025.

$8,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-234

Earth Action Trust

Community

Towards logistic support contractor, container rent, volunteer reimbursement, van cost to deliver TeamUp 2 CleanUp project from 1 June 2024 to 31 May 2024.

$3,500.00

Eligible

MB2324-238

NZ Writers Guild Inc

Arts and culture

Towards rent, bookkeeping and audit cost for NZWG - the association that advises, advocates for NZ scriptwriters from 1 May 2024 to 31 October 2025.

$7,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-240

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards contractor fees for volunteer training and triage supervision.

$6,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-249

Aotearoa Resettled Community Coalition Incorporated

Community

Towards camera rental, gear rental, vouchers, multi-media, and filming.

$8,943.89

Ineligible

MB2324-250

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

Community

Towards accommodation, radio advertising, mentor manager wage and volunteers psychological screening for programme delivery from 30 September 2024 to 30 August 2025.

$6,500.00

Eligible

MB2324-251

Garden to Table Trust

Community

Towards salaries, mileage, and home office costs for the Garden to Table Food Education Programme.

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-266

Recreate NZ

Community

Towards event facilitation, volunteer costs, activity costs, transportation, and venue hire for Urban Youth Programmes for Rangatahi with Disabilities across Tāmakai Makaurau.

$4,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-270

Habitat for Humanity Northern Region Limited

Community

Towards Healthy Home Programme delivery costs including the purchase of intervention items and contribution to community education from 1 July 2024 to 30 June 2025.

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-273

Auckland Softball Association Inc.

Sport and recreation

Towards a proportion of annual operating expenses excluding salaries.

$10,000.00

Ineligible

MB2324-280

Support Limited

Community

Towards operational costs for providing mental health services including workshops and a support helpline service.

$12,974.72

Ineligible

MB2324-281

The Voices of Hope Trust

Community

We request support for Marketing.

$4,000.00

Ineligible

MB2324-293

Young Workers Resource Centre

Community

Towards wages for employing an education coordinator.

$10,000.00

Ineligible

MB2324-299

Feelings for Life Charitable Trust

Community

Towards venue hire, catering, wages, resources, and graphic design at 30 Tamaki Drive from 1 June 2024 to 1 July 2025.

$3,412.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$164,433.11

 

 

c)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received in Albert-Eden Accommodation Support Fund 2024, listed in Table Three below:

Application ID

Applicant

Accommodation Location

Amount requested

Eligibility

ASF2401-101

The Massive Company Trust

562 Richmond Rd
Grey Lynn Auckland 1021

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF2401-104

Mount Albert Presbyterian Church

14 Mount Albert Rd
Mount Albert Auckland 1025

$3,060.00

Eligible

ASF2401-105

Point Chevalier Bowling Club Incorporated

25 Dignan St
Point Chevalier Auckland 1022

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF2401-106

Ponsonby Community Toy Library Incorporated

Subud Hall, 19 Formby Avenue
Pt Chevalier Auckland 1022

$8,000.00

Eligible

ASF2401-107

Auckland Youth Orchestra Inc.

C/- St Peter's Music Department
23 Mountain Rd
Grafton Auckland 1023

$7,920.00

Eligible

ASF2401-108

The Music Association Of Auckland

c/o 31 Dudley Road
Mission Bay Auckland 1071

$4,720.00

Eligible

ASF2401-109

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

300 Great South Rd
Greenlane Auckland 1051

$9,000.00

Eligible

ASF2401-111

Central Auckland Chinese Association

489 Dominion Rd
Mount Eden Auckland 1024

$9,577.00

Eligible

ASF2401-113

Carlton Croquet Club Incorporated

333 Manukau Rd
Epsom Auckland 1023

$2,641.72

Eligible

ASF2401-114

Brain Injury Association Auckland Inc

207 Manukau Rd
Epsom Auckland 1023

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF2401-115

Disha New Zealand (NZ)

260 Balmoral Rd
Sandringham Auckland 1025

$18,400.00

Eligible

ASF2401-116

Everlasting Clothing New Zealand Trust

52 Richardson Rd
Mt Albert
Auckland 1025

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF2401-117

Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust

93B Moa Road, Pt Chevalier, Auckland

$5,000.00

Eligible

ASF2401-118

Somerville Hockey Club Incorporated

3 Normanby Rd
Mount Eden Auckland 1024

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF2401-119

Friends of Oakley Creek Te Auaunga Incorporated

4/65 Woodward Rd
Mount Albert Auckland 1025

$6,912.00

Eligible

ASF2401-120

Eden Epsom Tennis & Squash

1 Penrhyn Rd
Mount Eden Auckland 1024

$2,500.00

Eligible

ASF2401-121

Aotearoa Africa Foundation

208 Richardson Rd
Mount Albert Auckland 1025

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF2401-122

Mount Albert Community Playgroup Incorporated

773 New North Rd
Mount Albert Auckland 1025

$6,785.00

Eligible

ASF2401-123

Auckland Swords Club

Auckland Grammar School, Old Gym Gate 3
55 Mountain Road
Epsom Auckland

$14,000.00

Eligible

ASF2401-124

Epsom Chinese Association Inc.

3/43 Epsom Ave
Epsom Auckland 1023

$5,980.00

Eligible

ASF2401-125

Auckland Basketball Services Limited

Level 4, Sport Auckland House
Greenlane Rd (West)
Epsom Auckland 1051

$17,250.00

Eligible

ASF2401-126

Auckland Tamil Association In corporated

9 Linden St 
Mount Roskill Auckland 1041

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF2401-127

Script to Screen Te Tari Tuhi Kupu A Whakaahua

21 Taylors Rd
Mount Albert Auckland 1025

$10,000.00

Eligible

ASF2401-128

Action Education Incorporated

2 Owens Rd
Epsom, Auckland 1023

$8,833.00

Eligible

ASF2401-130

Dress for Success Incorporated

128 Khyber Pass Rd
Grafton Auckland 1023

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF2401-131

The Girl Guides Association New Zealand Incorporated (known as GirlGuiding New Zealand)

Point Chevalier Scout & Guide Hall, Balmoral Scout Hall, St Luke's Church, St Andrews Church, Epsom. Epsom Community Centre

$14,000.00

Eligible

ASF2401-132

Pt Chevalier Tennis Club

335 Point Chevalier Rd
Point Chevalier Auckland 1022

$3,723.72

Eligible

ASF2401-133

New Zealand Nejashi Trust Incorporated

166 Stoddard Rd
Top Floor
Mount Roskill Auckland 1041

$14,400.00

Eligible

ASF2401-134

Community Cafe (trading as Tupu'anga Coffee)

597 Mount Eden Rd
Mount Eden Auckland 1024

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF2401-135

Conservation Volunteers New Zealand

10 New North Rd
Villa Dalmacija Building, Level 2
Eden Terrace Auckland 1021

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF2401-136

Auckland Sexual Abuse Help Foundation Charitable Trust

2 Conway Rd
Mount Eden Auckland 1024

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF2401-137

Panacea Arts Charitable Trust

Fowlds Park
Rocky Nook Ave
Morningside Auckland 1022

$6,250.00

Eligible

ASF2401-138

Anxiety NZ Trust

77 Morningside Dr
Auckland 1025

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF2401-139

MyLaunchPad Ltd / MyLaunchPad Charitable Trust

607 New North Rd
Morningside Auckland 1021

$20,000.00

Eligible

ASF2401-140

Tardigrade World Charitable Trust

50 Bright St
Eden Terrace Auckland 1021

$5,184.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$444,136.44

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

9.       Auckland Council’s Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

10.     The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close any additional accountability requirements.

11.     The Albert-Eden Local Board adopted the Albert-Eden Local Board Community Grants Programme 2023/2024 on 22 June 2023 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

12.     The community grants programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

13.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $140,500 for the 2023/2024 financial year. A total of $137,203 was allocated in the previous grant rounds. This leaves a total of $3,297 to be allocated to one quick response and one multiboard round.

14.     The Albert-Eden Local Board has set a total accommodation budget of $136,334 for the 2023/2024 financial year, with one grant round.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The aim of the local board grants programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include:

·        local food production and food waste reduction

·        decreasing use of single-occupancy transport options

·        home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation

·        local tree planting and streamside revegetation

·        education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

18.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Albert-Eden Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

20.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they can increase their chances of success in the future.

21.     A summary of each application received through Albert-Eden Quick Response Round Two and Multiboard Round Two 2023/2024 (Attachment B) and (Attachment C) and the Accommodation Support Fund 2024 (Attachment D) is provided.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

23.     Eleven applicants applying to Albert-Eden Quick Response Round Two and sixteen applicants applying to Mulitboard Grants Round Two 2023/2024 indicate projects that target Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

25.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $140,500 for the 2023/2024 financial year. A total of $137,203 was allocated in the previous grant rounds. This leaves a total of $3,297 to be allocated to one quick response and one multiboard round.

26.     Twenty-five applications were received for Quick Response Round Two 2023/2024, requesting a total of $67,201.60 and twenty-three applications were received for Multiboard Round Two 2023/2024 requesting a total of $164,433.11.

27.     The Albert-Eden Local Board has set a total accommodation budget of $136,334 for the 2023/2024 financial year, with one grant round.

28.     Thirty-five applications were received for the Albert-Eden Accommodation Support Fund 2024, requesting a total of $444,136.44.

29.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Following the Albert-Eden Local Board allocating funding for round two of the quick response, round two of multiboard and the accommodation support round, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board Community Grants Programme 2023/2024

73

b

Albert-Eden Quick Response Round Two 2023/2024 - Grant Applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Albert-Eden Multiboard Round Two 2023/2024 - Grant Applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Albert-Eden Accommodation Support Fund 2024 - Grant Applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moumita Dutta - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 









Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grant for 2024/2025

File No.: CP2024/05246

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To confirm Business Improvement District (BID) annual compliance against the Auckland Council BID Policy (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) as of 10 March 2024.

2.       To consider whether the local board should recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for the Mt Eden, Uptown, Dominion Road, and Kingsland Business Improvement District (BID) programmes for the 2024/2025 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

 BID-operating business associations within the local board area

3.       Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are programmes where local business and property owners have agreed to work together to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

4.       The BID Policy includes a total of 23 Requirements, 19 are the direct responsibility of the Business Improvement District (BID) and inform this report. As part of the 19 Requirements, the BIDs are required to provide annual accountability reports which are due 10 March each year.

5.       The BID annual accountability reports on public funds received by the BID within the local board area for the 2022/2023 financial year and has a direct link to council’s Long-Term Plan 2024-2034 and year one of that process to strike the BID targeted rates for 2024/2025.

6.       Albert-Eden Local Board has four BIDs operating in its local area:

Table 1: BID targeted rate sought 2024/2025

Incorporated Society Name

Proposed 2024/2025 Targeted Rate

Met BID Policy annual accountability reports

 

Mt Eden BID

$99,035.00

ü

Dominion Road BID 

$267,750.00

ü

Kingsland BID

$245,067.90

ü

Uptown BID

$787,500.00

 

ü

 

7.       Staff recommend that the local board approves Mt Eden, Uptown, Dominion Road, and Kingsland BIDs to receive their targeted rate grant for 2024/2025.

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      recommends to the Governing Body the setting of the 2024/2025 targeted rates for inclusion in the Long-Term Plan for the following Business Improvement District (BID) programmes:

i)        $99,035.00 for Mt Eden BID

ii)       $267,750.00 for Dominion Road 

iii)      $787,500.00 for Uptown BID

iv)      $245,067.90 for Kingsland BID.

 

Horopaki

Context

BID Policy and BID targeted rate grant agreement

 

8.       Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2022) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi includes a total of 23 Requirements, 19 are the direct responsibility of the BID-operating business association and inform this annual report. (Attachment A).

9.       The remaining four BID Policy Requirements set out the process for establishing, expanding, and discontinuing a BID programme; and determines rating mechanisms. These will be covered within individual BID local board reports.

10.     The BID Policy does not prescribe or measure standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for business association members to determine. Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

11.     The BID Policy is supported by a BID Targeted Rate Grant Agreement, a three-year agreement signed by both Auckland Council and each BID-operating business association’s executive committee. The agreement sets out the relationship between the parties, how payment will be made and that compliance with the BID Policy is mandatory. The agreement confirms the business associations independence from Auckland Council. All 51 BIDs have signed a BID Targeted Rate Grant Agreement for period 1 December 2022 to 30 December 2025.

12.     This report updates the local board on compliance with the 19 BID Policy Requirements that are the responsibility of the Business Improvement District (BID), with a focus on the BIDs annual accountability reporting (BID Policy Requirements 9, 11 and 18) relating to public funds received by the BID for the 2022/2023 financial year.

13.     This report includes a copy of the individual BIDs Governance Summary documents, Attachment B, C, D and E. These documents include the full resolution detailing the amount of BID targeted rate grant approved by association members at their 2023 AGM for the 2024/2025 financial year. The BID Chair also agrees, by signing this document, to advise council of any perceived or real/current issues that can affect compliance with the BID Policy.

BID Programmes

14.     Local BID programmes should provide value to the collective business community by delivering a suite of economic activities that respond to local needs and opportunities and are agreed by the local business community. BID programmes also provide the opportunity to work with the council group and engage with local boards.

15.     The BID programme does not replicate services provided by the council but channels the capabilities and knowledge of the private sector to improve economic outcomes and achieve common goals.

16.     Each business association operating a BID programme sets the BID targeted rate grant amount at its Annual General Meeting (AGM) when members vote to approve a detailed income and expenditure operational budget and business plan for the following financial year.

17.     Responsibility for delivery and outcomes of the BID programme sits with the individual BID-operating business association executive committee (provision of reporting information) and members (reviewing information provided to them by the executive committee).

18.    All BIDs are registered incorporated societies and need to be aware of the requirement to re-register by April 2026 under the updated Incorporated Societies Act 2022

Albert-Eden Local Board BID Targeted Rates 2024/2025

19.     Albert-Eden Local Board has four  BIDs operating in their local board area. Table 2 shows the amount of targeted rate each BID had approved at their 2023 AGM for the 2024/2025 and linked to the council’s Long-Term Plan 2024/2034 and annual budget 2024/2025 approval process.

Table 2: BID targeted rate changes in 2024/2025

Incorporated Society Name

Proposed 2024/2025 Targeted Rate

Change from previous year

Last year target rate amount was increased

Mt Eden Business Association

$99,035.00

5.32%

2023

Dominion Road Business Association

$267,750.00

5%

2022

Kingsland Business Association

$245,067.90

0%

2022

Uptown Business Association

$787,500.00

 

50%

2023

 

Decision-making

Auckland Council

20.     The recommendation in this report is put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the Long-Term Plan 2024/2025 and its striking (setting) of the 2024/2025 targeted rates.

21.     In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, the Governing Body is authorised to make the final decisions on what BID programme targeted rates, if any, to set in any particular year or property (in terms of the amount and the geographic area to be rated).

Local Boards

22.     Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body if it is satisfied that the BID is sufficiently complying with the BID Policy.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Regional overview

23.     The BID Policy has been in place since 2022 and applies to 51 BIDs across the ā-rohe, up from 50 BIDs reported in the 2023 report to local boards.

24.     Thirty-six BIDs increased their targeted rates 2024/2025 - between 2 per cent to 50 per cent - while 15 maintained the fiscal status quo.

25.     Of the 11 BIDs with income under the $120,000 minimum (BID Policy Requirement 4), two BIDs now meet this requirement as of 10 March 2024. Of the remaining nine BIDs, three have made no comment to increase their income. Five BIDs have increased their BID Targeted rate grant and are on track to meet this requirement by 1 July 2028 and one has indicated interest in a BID expansion project.

Regional BID Programme Growth

26.     Onehunga BID achieved a successful expansion ballot in February 2024. This will see them evolve from a retail-focused BID to encompass retail, commercial and industrial areas, with a significant growth in target rate commencing 1 July 2024.

27.     Kingsland BID has confirmed at their 2023 AGM they would implement a BID expansion project in 2024/2025.

28.     Grey Lynn Business Association will be holding a ballot later this year towards establishing as a new BID from 1 July 2025.

29.     Takanini Business Association is on track to progress their BID establishment project aiming to become a new BID from 1 July 2026.

BID 2024 Accountability Reporting process overview

30.     Upon receipt of individual BID annual accountability documents, staff follow a set process that includes reviewing the documents provided for 10 March 2024 against the BID policy, analysing changes from the previous accountability period, and following up with BIDs on issues.

31.     Generic observations from year 2024 accountability include:

·    limited local board discretionary funding was available which led to BIDs having a greater focus on efficiencies in their own BID budgets.

·    improving quality of annual discussions between local boards and BID-operating business associations. Less emphasis on operational aspects and more discussion on how they could collaborate.

32.     The BID Policy, requirement 11, sets out the documents that form the annual accountability reporting documents for each BID. These documents confirm membership decision-making has taken place regarding the BID programme at the 2023 AGM. Other reporting requirements include the filing of annual financial statements with the Companies Office under the Incorporated Societies Act.

33.     The BID team observed this year BIDs have paid less attention to providing the required annual accountability documents by the 10 March 2024 due date, compared with the previous year. Fifty-one per cent (26) of BIDs successfully completed their annual accountability reporting by the due date of 10 March 2024. Forty-one per cent (21) received notification that they had missing information or documents and were provided an extension to the 10 March deadline. 

34.     Four BIDs failed to meet BID Policy Requirement 11 and did not complete annual accountability reporting.

35.     Requirements 9 and 18 of the BID Policy are focused on BID affiliates having access to BID programme information and the BID targeted rate spend. It specifies a range of information BIDs must ensure are easily and freely accessible on a suitable online platform.

36.     This year a one-off ‘Website Check List’ was added to the annual accountability reporting

Albert-Eden Local Board BIDs

37.     Using the documents and information submitted, the BID Team is satisfied that Kingsland, Uptown, Mt Eden, and Dominion Road BIDs have sufficiently met the BID Policy Requirements and the BID Policy for setting of the BID targeted rates for 2024/2025.

38.     Staff advise the local board to recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for 2024/2025 as set out in Table 1.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

39.     Through targeted rate-funded advocacy and activities, BID-operating business associations promote and can facilitate environmental sustainability programmes and climate response where appropriate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     Advocacy is a key service provided by business associations that operate a BID programme. BID-operating business associations ensure the views and ambitions of their members are provided to elected representatives and council teams, including CCOs, on those policies, plans, programmes, and projects that impact them.

41.     BIDs work with several Council-Controlled Organisations including Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku and Tātaki Auckland Unlimited.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     The local board’s views are most frequently expressed by its appointed representative on the board of each BID-operating business association. This liaison board member (or alternates) can attend BID board meetings to ensure there is a direct link between the council and the operation of the BID programme.

43.     Kingsland, Uptown, Mt Eden, and Dominion Road BID programmes best align with the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2023, Outcome: Our Economy. 

44.     Recommending that the Governing Body sets the targeted rates for Mt Eden, Uptown, Dominion Road and Kingsland business associations means that these BID programmes will continue to be funded from targeted rates on commercial properties in their respective rohe. They will provide services in accordance with their members’ priorities as stated in their strategic plans.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

45.     The BID Policy and the annual accountability process does not prescribe or report on individual BID programme’s effectiveness, outcomes, or impacts for Māori. However individual BIDs may include this level of detail in other reports provided to their members. This localised project reporting is not a requirement of the BID Policy and is not part of the BID Policy annual accountability reporting.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.     There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from business ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the associations every quarter.

47.     The targeted rate is payable by the owners of the business rated properties within the geographic area of the individual BID programmes

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     To sustain public trust and confidence in the council, the BID Policy sets out a balance between the independence of the BID-operating business associations and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

49.     For the council to be confident that the targeted rate grant funds provided to the BID-operating business associations are being used appropriately, it requires the BIDs to fully complete all annual accountability reporting and the 19 BID Policy Requirements that are the responsibility of the BID. 

50.     Council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy throughout the year including responding to queries and issues raised by council staff, members of the BID, the public and elected members.

51.     We actively grow relationships with council departments that interact with BID programmes to ensure a consistent approach is applied for the programme.

52.     The role of the local board representative is a key link between the parties involved in the BID programme in terms of communication and feedback.  Local board representatives on BID programmes are strongly encouraged to contact the BID Team if they have any queries or concerns.

53.     This report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds. It provides an annual update that the BIDs operating within the local board area are compliant with the BID Policy.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

54.     If the local board supports this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the BID targeted rates be set as part of the Long-Term Plan 2024/2034 including the annual budget 2024/2025.

55.     After the targeted rates are approved, the council will collect the targeted rate funds effective from 1 July 2024 and distribute them in quarterly BID grant payments to Mt Eden, Uptown Dominion Road, and Kingsland BIDs.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

BID Policy 2022 - all requirements and responsibilities for accountability

89

b

Governance Summary - Dominion Road BID

93

c

Governance Summary - Mt Eden BID

97

d

Governance Summary - Kingsland BID

99

e

Governance Summary - Uptown BID

101

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Gill Plume - BID Senior Advisor

Claire Siddens - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 





Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 




Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Great North Road Dynamic Bus Lane Local Board Feedback

File No.: CP2024/06009

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To summarise the key points regarding the current status of the Great North Road Dynamic Bus Lane project and to seek formal feedback.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport has developed a proposal to introduce a dynamic bus lane on Great North Road between Blockhouse Bay Road and SH16 to improve bus travel times and reliability.

3.       Public consultation has been undertaken on the proposal and feedback presented to the local board.

4.       Auckland Transport is now seeking feedback from the local board on the proposal.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      provide its feedback on the Great North Road Dynamic Bus Lane proposal to enable Auckland Transport to complete consultation.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. AT reports on a regular basis to local boards, as set out in the Local Board Engagement Plan. This reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Impacts of Dynamic Bus Lane

6.       Dynamic bus lanes have been proposed on Great North Road between Blockhouse Bay Road and SH16 to improve bus travel times and reliability.

7.       A dynamic lane allows for lanes to have different uses at different times. This dynamic lane will operate northbound toward the motorway during the morning peak (6am-10am) and will repurpose the flush median in the middle of the road, to allow for an extra bus lane in the mornings.

8.       There will still be two general traffic lanes each way. However, to allow for the extra bus lane, there will be no right turn into and out of roads that don’t have traffic lights when the lane is active. Outside of the morning peak the lane reverts to a flush median and right turns will be allowed.

9.       General traffic travel times are up to 3 times longer in peak traffic along this stretch of Great North Road compared to off peak (increasing from 2.5 minutes up to 6.5 minutes), which means buses are also experiencing this delay and struggling to stick to their timetables throughout the bus route.

10.     Benefits of the proposal are:

·        Dynamic lanes have been successfully implemented on Whangaparaoa Road and Redoubt Road.

·        Improved traffic congestion for all road users.

·        Buses will be more reliable, and journey times will be shorter.

·        A new safe signalised pedestrian crossing will be added in the middle of the block between Fairlands Avenue and Blockhouse Bay Road (outside of the Albert-Eden Local Board area).

11.     Impacts of the proposal are:

·        No parking will be removed.

·        The flush median will become an additional general vehicle lane, which means that to turn right into (or out of) Oakley Avenue, Alverston Street or Fairlands Avenue between 6.00am and 10.00am, you will need to travel one block further to Fir Street, Alford Street or Herdman Street which have traffic lights and turning lanes.

·        Two pedestrian crossing islands will be removed.

·        Seven gantries will be installed along Great North Road, two of these will be adjacent to residential properties, however they will be combined with existing streetlights for minimal impact.

·        There will be a period of construction for several months to install infrastructure required.

12.     The consultation presented a design proposal for a northbound dynamic bus lane and took the opportunity to seek early feedback on whether AT should also consider a southbound lane in future.  

13.     Introducing a dynamic lane is likely to require three right turn bans which will require some local residents travelling an additional block to get to the nearest traffic light in peak periods.  Some inconvenience will also be caused for drivers making right turns into or from properties with frontages on Great North Road during peak periods. Cars waiting to turn will need to remain in the Southbound lane instead of the flush median, which may cause delays behind them while the bus lane is activated. This potential impact is in the counter-peak direction where traffic levels are much lower in the morning.

14.     The number of drivers impacted is significantly less for the AM peak dynamic bus lane due to low numbers of southbound right turning traffic at this time and limited development on the eastern side of Great North Road.

Public Consultation

15.     Public consultation opened on the 23 November 2023 and closed on the 12 January 2024. Consultation was extended to the 12 January 2024 at the request of the community, and an additional drop-in session held locally in Waterview, with an additional round of letters and advertising.

16.     Drop-in sessions were held at:

·        The Avondale Community Centre on the 30 November 2023, and

·        The Waterview Methodist Church on the 18 December 2023.

17.     Promotion of the consultation was extensive, with digital ads reaching over 133,000 people and mail drops reaching 15,769. The consultation website page had 4,700 total visits.

18.     166 individual submissions and two group submissions were received.

A blue and white logo

Description automatically generated

19.     The main concerns raised by the Waterview Community were:

·        The loss of the median strip both as a safety mechanism and for those accessing properties on Great North Road,

·        Reduction of right-hand turns,

·        The risk that the reduced right-hand turns may inadvertently create “rat runs” and safety risks in streets like Herdman Street and Oakley Avenue which are home to Waterview Kindergarten and Waterview Primary School.

Discussion

20.     Provision of a northbound AM peak only dynamic bus lane significantly reduces the impact on local residents however the greater overall benefit is achieved with inclusion of the southbound PM peak dynamic lane.

21.     While significant congestion levels were recorded in March 2023, when looking at a 12-month average bus delays due to congestion improved. It is therefore recommended that further consideration should be given to the priority and timing of progressing a dynamic lane on Great North Road.

22.     Before the results of the consultation are finalised, AT is seeking feedback from the Local Board on the way forward for the Great North Road Dynamic Bus Lane.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     AT engages closely with the council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and the council’s priorities. 

24.     AT reviews the potential climate impacts of all projects and works hard to minimise carbon emissions. AT’s work programme is influenced by council direction through Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

25.     This project aims to deliver shorter and more efficient journey times.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     In 2022, the mayor provided Auckland Transport with a Letter of Expectation which directed AT to improve the relationship with local boards, including providing more opportunity to influence decision-making.  Specifically, that:

“The Statement of Intent 2023-2026 must set out how AT will achieve closer Local Board involvement in the design and planning stage of local transport projects that affect their communities”.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     The purpose of this report is to formalise the local board’s views.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori.

29.     Auckland Transport’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website: https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     This decision has no financial implications for Albert-Eden Local Board because Auckland Transport funds all projects and programmes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     Risks relating to construction will be managed with best practice. A Transport Management Plan will be developed prior to the commencement of works.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     AT will consider any new feedback and respond as appropriate.

33.     As the project progress the local board will be regularly updated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Thomas – Elected Member Relationship Partner

Authorisers

John Gillespie – Head of Elected Member Engagement, Auckland Transport

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Central Crosstown Bus Changes – Local Board Feedback

File No.: CP2024/06012

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To summarise the key points of the planned Central Crosstown bus changes and to seek formal feedback.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The following changes to central isthmus bus services are planned:

·    OuterLink

replaced by new 64 route through Mount Eden

Improving reliability between Mount Albert / Pt Chevalier and city centre

·    Route 64 extended route to St Lukes via Sandringham Road

·    Route 65 every 15 minutes, seven days a week

·    Route 66 more evening trips

·    Routes 27H & 27W more peak-hour, peak-direction trips

·    A new school bus from Dominion Road to Epsom schools.

3.       Depending on staging and funding these developments are planned to occur in October 2024.

4.       Some infrastructure changes are required to enable these changes:

·    Walker Park, Point Chevalier – space for waiting buses is needed

·    Cornwallis Street, St Lukes – space for waiting buses is needed

·    Walters Road, Mt Eden – new bus stop on Walters Road and nearby on Sandringham Road. Buses will travel in both direction on Walters Road not one-way as they currently do.

·    Building a “neighbourhood bus interchange” at Balmoral Road / Mt Eden Road intersection to make transferring between buses easier.

5.       These changes will improve the bus network for many people allowing more people to rely on and use buses.

6.       Some existing users will have to change the way they travel and may require two buses instead of one to get to their destinations.

7.       Some on-street parking will be removed in order to create space for buses.

8.       The board may choose to provide feedback on the recent update and additional information.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      provide its feedback on the planned Central Crosstown bus changes.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways.  AT reports on a regular basis to local boards, as set out in the Local Board Engagement Plan. This reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Bus network principles

10.     Auckland’s bus network is based on three principles: frequency, connectivity and simplicity. The aim is to provide greater access around Auckland for more people, at more times of the day, more often.

11.     The key routes in the network are called ‘Frequent’ routes. These routes meet our ‘frequent promise’ with each route running at least every 15 minutes, 7.00am to 7.00pm, 7 days a week. These routes also run earlier and later than this, and many will run at a frequency higher than 15 minutes. These routes have a two-digit route number.

12.     By having fewer routes at higher frequencies, you can still travel to a wider range of destinations, with more options of when to travel. This also makes more efficient use of resources as there is less duplication between services travelling the same routes.

13.     Reliability is the key to trust. Buses that run on time, with predictable journey times are more likely to be used by more people.

Benefits of these bus changes

14.     The OuterLink is the only bus regularly connecting Point Chevalier, Westmere and Herne Bay with the city centre. It is scheduled to run every 10 to 15 minutes but its long circular route has many possibilities for delay and so these communities get unreliable arrival times and with bunching and large gaps between buses. AT receives a lot of negative feedback related to buses not turning up and longer than expected waiting times. An example of its irregular arrival times are shown in the AT Mobile app.

15.     The new 65 crosstown bus will be more frequent throughout the day and evening so people have less waiting time than with the current 650 bus service that it will replace.

16.     There will be a new bus connection to St Lukes with the extension of bus route 64 route.

17.     On balance, AT believe these changes will offer benefits to users of Crosstown services as well as OuterLink users.

Consultation

18.     In 2019, AT consulted on a proposal to address the unreliability of the OuterLink; this proposal received almost 1,200 responses. Based on this feedback, AT now have a revised proposal that would benefit more than half of OuterLink users.

Changes to OuterLink

19.     No longer travels through Mount Eden between St Lukes and Newmarket. This section is replaced with routes 64 and 65. See the orange route in the map below.

20.     Creates more reliability, less bunching, and less need for waiting along the route at timing points along the route.

21.     No longer goes to the bus stop at Herne Bay Road in Herne Bay. This will remove a short out and back section of the route shortening journey times for the majority of travellers. The next bus stop is 350m away.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 1: Map showing the changes to OuterLink route in orange

New route 65

22.     The current route 650 will be renamed route 65. It will run more frequently, every 15 minutes, and later in the evening.

23.     It will continue to serve Selwyn Village in Point Chevalier every 30 minutes during the day on weekdays.

Changes to Route 64

24.     Route 64 will be extended to St Lukes from Kingsland Station. See the pink route in the map below.

25.     Will travel on Sandringham Road and St Lukes Road.

26.     Will travel in both directions on Walters Road. It currently travels in the eastbound direction only.

27.     Will no longer travel on Onslow Road.

28.     Travels on Sandringham Road and not Dominion Road because:

·        The connection to Kingsland Station needs to remain while Maungawhau Station is closed

·        Following the opening of Maungawhau Station it will connect Mount Eden with the businesses in Kingsland

·        It connects with other bus services at Kingsland

·        Sandringham Road has fewer buses than Dominion Road

·        Seven per cent of people board the 64 bus from the stops on Sandringham Road (an average of 79 boardings per day out of 1121 boardings in total). We will monitor this to see the changes after Maungawhau Station opens.

 

 

 

 

Figure 2: Map showing the changes to Route 64 in pink

New school bus service for Epsom schools

29.     A new school bus service for Epsom schools will be introduced. It will following the current OuterLink route between St Lukes and Newmarket with a trip to Newmarket on school day mornings and a trip to St Lukes on school day afternoons. See the route map below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 3: Map showing the new school bus service in blue

Infrastructure requirements

30.     The following infrastructure are required to support the changes to the bus network.

·        Bus parking space on Cornwallis Avenue. This will involve removing some on street parking space next to Warren Freer Park.

·        Bus parking space on Muripara Avenue next to Walker Park, Point Chevalier. And bus stop changes on Target Road because the direction of the bus loop will change.

·        New bus stop on Walters Road near Sandringham Road.

·        New bus stop on Sandringham Road near Walters Road.

·        Bus stop changes and pedestrian improvements at the Mount Eden / Balmoral intersection. The changes are:

Bus stop relocations

-     From No. 61 to No. 55A Balmoral Road

-     Minor shift outside No. 58-70 Balmoral Road

-     From No. 581 to No. 623 Mount Eden Road

-     From No. 2 Pencarrow Avenue (on Mount Eden Road) to No. 626 Mount Eden Road.

New bus shelters at the new bus stops

Raised zebra crossings with upgraded traffic islands

Replacing left/straight lanes with left turn only lanes except for buses

Short section of new bus lanes

Improved pedestrian footpath connection through Udys Reserve

New parking spaces near the relocated bus stop outside No. 581 Mount Eden Road

Minor extension of the southbound bus lane on Mount Eden Road

See attached plans.

These changes will improve bus and pedestrian infrastructure, particularly for bus patrons who transfer from one bus to another near the intersection of Mount Eden Road and Balmoral Road. The proposed bus stop relocations will position the bus stops closer to the intersection, reducing how far pedestrians need to walk when transferring between north/south and east/west buses.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     AT engages closely with the council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and the council’s priorities. 

32.     AT reviews the potential climate impacts of all projects and works hard to minimise carbon emissions. AT’s work programme is influenced by council direction through Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     In 2022, the mayor provided Auckland Transport with a Letter of Expectation which directed AT to improve the relationship with local boards, including providing more opportunity to influence decision-making. Specifically, that:

“The Statement of Intent 2023-2026 must set out how AT will achieve closer Local Board involvement in the design and planning stage of local transport projects that affect their communities”.

34.     AT’s ‘2023-2026 Statement of Intent’ reflects this direction stating that:

“We (AT) will engage more meaningfully and transparently with Local Boards, recognising that they represent their communities, and that they should have greater involvement in local transport projects that affect those communities. This means a genuine partnership where we seek to understand the unique and diverse needs of each Local Board at a regional level, not just by project. We will work in partnership to integrate those needs into our planning. We will support Local Boards to communicate integrated local transport planning to their communities”.

35.     Project Kōkiri provides an annual process where local boards prioritise a group of key programmes or projects, identifying them to AT, and setting engagement levels that capture the local board’s expectations. This plan forms the basis for regular reporting on key programs and projects.  Project Kōkiri will be supported by regular updates to provide transparency.

36.     Project Kōkiri was developed working closely with Auckland Council’s Governance Division.  It has also been reported generally monthly to the Local Board Chair’s Forum and discussed with a reference group of local board chairs.

37.     Further, this work relies on historical engagement with both Auckland Council and with other CCOs.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.     In 2019, AT consulted on changes to central crosstown buses that included the OuterLink and 650 bus routes.  The consultation received 1,186 feedback responses. These responses provided us with a range of different views and themes.

39.     Following the consultation in 2019 we paused the project because:

·        AT needed more time to further understand the impacts of the closure and construction of Maungawhau (Mount Eden) Station, and monitor the effect of the new 64 bus service on travel patterns

·        We needed to consider what adjustments are required to bus stop infrastructure and services at key locations to make it easier and safer to transfer between buses

·        There was already a lot of change happening in the area with Maungawhau (Mount Eden) Station closing and the COVID 19 pandemic / lockdowns and we didn’t wish to overwhelm the Mount Eden area with too many changes to public transport services in such a short space of time.

40.     The main differences between the 2019 proposal and the 2023 changes are:

·        Route 64 is now in place and has been operating for three years 

·        There are now bus stops for Route 64 on Valley Road nearer Mt Eden Village

·        Route 64 will be extended to St Lukes. It will no longer run on Onslow Road and will run in both directions on Walters Road.

·        The OuterLink will no longer travel on Jervois Road west of West End Road.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

41.     Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori.

42.     AT’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

43.     This decision has no financial implications for the Albert-Eden Local Board because Auckland Transport funds all projects and programmes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.     The OuterLink is well used bus route. Its distinctive orange colour makes it easy to recognise and use.

45.     The route was introduced in 2011 and people have adapted to using it and now are comfortable going to the places that it takes them to.

46.     Around 26 per cent of trips would require a transfer to recreate their current journey. Around 8 per cent would require 2 transfers.

47.     These changes are planned to be launched while road works and temporary route diversions are in place in Point Chevalier.

48.     Clear communications with existing users, schools, residents groups, businesses and other stakeholders are planned to maximise understanding and minimise concern. A launch day assistance will involve AT staff and Ambassadors on the street to help.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

49.     AT will consider any new feedback and respond as appropriate.

50.     As the project progress the board will be regularly updated.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A

119

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Bruce Thomas – Elected Member Relationship Partner

Edward Newbegin - Principal Planner Customer Engagement

Engagement

Authorisers

John Gillespie – Head of Elected Member Engagement, Auckland Transport

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 



Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 





Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Local government elections 2025 – order of names on voting documents

File No.: CP2024/05575

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback to the Governing Body on how names should be arranged on the voting documents for the Auckland Council 2025 elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 provide a local authority the opportunity to decide by resolution whether the names on voting documents are arranged in:

·    alphabetical order of surname;

·    pseudo-random order; or

·    random order.

3.       Pseudo-random order means names are listed in a random order and the same random order is used on every voting document.

4.       Random order means names are listed in a random order and a different random order is used on every voting document.

5.       The overseas findings on ballot order effects is controversial[1] and based on elections that differ to local government elections in New Zealand. Auckland Council has based its decisions in the past on its own statistical analysis of previous election results.

6.       The order of names has been alphabetical for the 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019 and 2022 Auckland Council elections. From 2016, prior to each election a statistical analysis was conducted by RIMU Research and Evaluation Unit on the results of previous elections which each time has concluded that there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected. The focus was on whether there was any advantage to being listed first.

7.       RIMU extended the scope of the statistical analysis this time to include list positions other than first, and also the effects of “race[2] length”. This takes into account the number of candidates standing for a particular election race. The analysis confirms previous results in terms of candidates listed first but has found that where there are a larger number of candidates, being lower on the list in certain types of election race appeared to confer significant disadvantages. The full analysis is attached as Attachment A.

8.       This effect would be remedied by all names on the voting document being in random order. The disadvantage of random order is that it creates some friction for voters. Friction is anything that makes the voting experience harder. If names are ordered randomly then the voter has to undertake additional effort to identify the voter’s preferred candidates. This works against the overall goal of increasing voter turnout.

9.       Nevertheless, since the evidence is clear that in some cases alphabetical order creates a disadvantage, staff recommend that the order of names on Auckland Council voting documents for 2025 be random order.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      provide feedback to the Governing Body on whether candidate names on voting documents should be in random order given the statistical evidence that being lower on the list in certain types of election race appears to confer significant disadvantages.

 

Horopaki

Context

Options available

10.     Clause 31 of The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 states:

(1)     The names under which each candidate is seeking election may be arranged on the voting document in alphabetical order of surname, pseudo-random order, or random order.

(2)     Before the electoral officer gives further public notice under section 65(1) of the Act, a local authority may determine, by a resolution, which order, as set out in subclause (1), the candidates' names are to be arranged on the voting document.

(3)     If there is no applicable resolution, the candidates' names must be arranged in alphabetical order of surname.

(4)     If a local authority has determined that pseudo-random order is to be used, the electoral officer must state, in the notice given under section 65(1) of the Act, the date, time, and place at which the order of the candidates' names will be arranged and any person is entitled to attend.

(5)     In this regulation,—

pseudo-random order means an arrangement where —

(a) the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly; and

(b) all voting documents use that order

random order means an arrangement where the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly or nearly randomly for each voting document by, for example, the process used to print each voting document.

Previous elections

11.     In 2013, the council resolved to use alphabetical order of names, a consideration being an additional cost of $100,000 if the council chose the random order. From 2016 there has been no additional cost to use random order, due to changes in printing technology, however the council has chosen to use alphabetical order of names in past elections on the basis that statistical research did not indicate a compelling case to change to random order. 

12.     For the 2022 elections the following table outlines decisions of those regional and city councils whose data was available, with random order being used by 19 out of the 22 councils other than Auckland:

Auckland Council

Alphabetical

Bay Of Plenty Regional Council

Random

Environment Southland Regional Council

Random

Hawke's Bay Regional Council

Random

Manawatū-Whanganui Regional Council

Random

Northland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Otago Regional Council

Random

Southland Regional Council

Random

Taranaki Regional Council

Alphabetical

Waikato Regional Council

Random

West Coast Regional Council

Alphabetical

Christchurch City Council

Random

Dunedin City Council

Random

Hamilton City Council

Random

Hutt City Council

Random

Invercargill City Council

Random

Napier City Council

Random

Nelson City Council

Random

Palmerston North City Council

Random

Porirua City Council

Random

Tauranga City Council (2024)

Random

Upper Hutt City Council

Random

Wellington City Council

Random

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options for 2025

Pseudo-random order and true random order

13.     Random order printing removes name order bias, whereas the pseudo-random order of names simply substitutes a different order for an alphabetical order. For example, any first-name bias will transfer to the name at the top of the pseudo-random list. The only effective alternative to alphabetical order is true random order, which means the order on every voting document is different.

14.     A disadvantage to both the random printing options is that they create friction for the voter. Friction is anything that makes the voting experience harder. If names are ordered randomly then the voter has to undertake additional effort to identify the voter’s preferred candidates. This works against the overall goal of increasing voter turnout if the friction deters any voters.

Alphabetical order

15.     The advantage of the alphabetical order printing is that it is familiar, easier to use and to understand. When a large number of candidates compete for a position it is easier for a voter to find the candidate the voter wishes to support if names are listed alphabetically.

16.     It is also easier for a voter if the order of names on the voting documents follows the order of names in the directory of candidate profile statements accompanying the voting document. The directory is listed in alphabetical order. It is not possible to print it in such a way that each copy aligns with the random order of names on the accompanying voting documents.

17.     The disadvantage of alphabetical printing is that there is now evidence from a statistical analysis of council’s previous election results, that where there are a larger number of candidates, being lower on the list in certain types of election race confers significant disadvantages.

 

Analysis of previous election results

18.     An analysis[3] of the council’s election results for 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019 and 2022 is contained in Attachment A.

19.     Again, the analysis found no compelling evidence that candidates who were listed first were more likely to be elected in the last five Auckland Council elections.

20.     This time the analysis introduced consideration of positions other than first, and also of ‘election race length’ (for example, how many candidates were in each local board or ward race) and also added linear interpolation modelling.

21.     This extended analysis has found that comparing actual votes received proportional to the expected share, being lower on the list in certain types of election race appeared to confer significant disadvantages.

Conclusion

22.     A decision about the order of names on voting documents is made by resolution of the council under clause 31 of the Local Electoral Regulations 2001. Such regulations are provided for in section 139 of the Local Electoral Act 2001.

23.     Section 4 of the Local Electoral Act 2001 requires local authorities, when making decisions under the Act, to take into account the principles set out in section 4. These principles are:

(1)    The principles that this Act is designed to implement are the following:

(aa)   representative and substantial electoral participation in local elections and polls:

(a)     fair and effective representation for individuals and communities:

(b)     all qualified persons have a reasonable and equal opportunity to—

(i)     cast an informed vote:

(ii)    nominate 1 or more candidates:

(iii)   accept nomination as a candidate:

(c)     public confidence in, and public understanding of, local electoral processes through—

(i)      the provision of a regular election cycle:

(ii)      the provision of elections that are managed independently from the elected body:

(iii)     protection of the freedom of choice of voters and the secrecy of the vote:

(iv)    the provision of transparent electoral systems and voting methods and the adoption of procedures that produce certainty in electoral outcomes:

(v)     the provision of impartial mechanisms for resolving disputed elections and polls.

24.     The principles include substantial participation in the elections and public confidence in electoral processes. They also include a principle that all qualified persons have a reasonable and equal opportunity to accept nomination as a candidate. This implies a candidate should not be disadvantaged by virtue of their surname.

25.     While alphabetical ordering of names facilitates participation (supporting one of these principles), there is now evidence that this could disadvantage some candidates if they appear lower on the candidate list (compromising the principle that all persons have an equal opportunity to stand).

26.     In terms of public confidence, for the 2022 elections a website[4] criticised the council’s decision to use alphabetical order. This is the only known criticism however the council needs to be seen to be making this decision in a robust manner.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on the wider group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     Feedback from local boards will be reported to the Governing Body when it is asked to determine the matter by resolution.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     The order of names on voting documents does not specifically impact on the Māori community. It is noted that candidates can provide their profile statements both in English and Māori and that such profile statements are contained in the candidate profile booklet in alphabetic order.  Having voting documents in alphabetic order makes it easier for any voter to match the candidate in the profile booklet.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     There is no additional cost to the printing of voting documents if names are ordered using the random method.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     Given the widespread adoption of random order of names on voting documents among regional and city councils, if names are ordered alphabetically there is the risk of public criticism of the council’s decision.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     The feedback from the local board will be reported to the Governing Body.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo - Analysis of order of candidate names on election outcomes

129

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton, Principal Advisor, Governance Services

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager – Local Board Services

Rose Leonard – General Manager – Governance Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 













Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Board feedback into the Auckland Council's submission to the Fast-track Approvals Bill

File No.: CP2024/04694

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the board’s formal feedback on the Auckland Council’s submission on the Fast-track Approvals Bill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Central government introduced the Fast-track Approvals Bill under urgency on 7 March 2024. Central government intends to facilitate infrastructure and major projects with significant regional or national benefits. The Bill is with the Environment Select Committee.

3.       Council staff drafted a submission for consideration of the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee.

4.       Local board feedback was due by 17 April 2024 to be appended to the Auckland Council’s submission.

5.       Due to the short timeframes, feedback from the Albert-Eden Local Board was authorised by delegation to the Chair and Deputy Chair in accordance with the Urgent Decision process AE/2022/199.

6.       The Urgent Decision document, in Attachment A, includes the formal feedback that the board has provided.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      note the board’s formal feedback (Attachment A) on the Auckland Council’s submission on the Fast-track Approvals Bill, as authorised by delegation to the Chair and Deputy Chair in accordance with the Urgent Decision process AE/2022/199.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden -  Urgent Decision -  Feedback into Auckland Council's submission to the Fast-track Approvals Bill

143

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Canela Ferrara - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 















Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Local board appointment to Emergency Readiness and Response Forum

File No.: CP2024/05776

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To make appointments for participation in a Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Forum, coordinated by Auckland Emergency Management.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The role that local board members play during an emergency is becoming an increasingly important element of emergency management.

3.       To support this role, a Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Forum is proposed.

4.       The terms of reference (Attachment A) show that the forum will have no decision-making role or budgetary responsibility. The vision will be “local board members with an interest in emergency management working together to strengthen their role in emergency readiness and response.”

5.       The forum will provide participants with opportunities to learn more about readiness and response in a collaborative environment, to increase their capacity to advocate for readiness and response measures, and to provide informal guidance to staff on related issues.

6.       After local boards make their appointments, an initial Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be scheduled for July.

7.       Staff recommend the forum meet three times a year. Additional meetings can be arranged if there is urgent content that requires discussion between scheduled forum sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      kopou / appoint up to three members to participate in the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Following the weather events of January and February 2023, Auckland Emergency Management was subject to several reviews and various recommendations.

9.       Part of the implementation of the recommendations included the establishment of a Planning Unit and an associated Community Planning and Readiness Manager, with a team of seven Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisors, to support readiness and preparedness at the local level.

10.     The Head of Planning Unit commenced 15 January 2024, and appointments to the Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisor roles were made in late 2023, with the last Senior Advisor commencing their role early February 2024.

11.     All local boards have expressed a desire to be more involved in readiness and response, and to be upskilled in advance of another catastrophic weather event.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Local board members are passionate about ensuring the best outcomes for their communities before, during, and following an emergency.

13.     A number of gaps have been identified where, during an emergency, local board members did not have the information they needed to best support their communities and the emergency response. Recent events also highlighted the importance of community readiness, and the role that people played to support each other during a response.

14.     In response to this, the Auckland Emergency Management Planning Manager has written terms of reference (Attachment A) to set out the parameters of an Emergency Readiness and Response Forum, intended to provide elected members with opportunities to:

·    learn more about emergency readiness and response

·    share relevant knowledge with other local board members and with their communities

·    improve connections between participants at a governance level

·    encourage collaboration between local boards to support emergency readiness and response outcomes

·    provide informal guidance to staff in regard to emergency readiness and response

·    share relevant insights with other members of their local boards, as appropriate.

15.     The vision of the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum is “local board members with an interest in emergency management work together to strengthen their role in emergency readiness and response”.

16.     Boards are invited to appoint up to three members to the forum. Participation is at the discretion of local boards, with no obligation to appoint members. Local boards that choose not to appoint any members to the group will receive minutes and be able to watch recording of forum meetings.

17.     The group will have no decision-making role or budgetary oversight.

18.     The terms of reference set out details of meetings and communication for the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum and provide further information about the roles and responsibilities of participants. Staff advice is for the group to meet three times a year, but the meeting frequency and schedule will be confirmed in consultation with the participating elected members.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The formation and operation of the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum has no direct climate impact, particularly as the group will meet online only.

20.     The impacts of climate change on weather patterns mean that catastrophic weather events are likely to become more frequent. Response and readiness will form a significant part of ensuring that impacts on our communities are mitigated where possible.

 

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be administered by staff from the council’s Auckland Emergency Management team, with support from kaimahi in the Local Board Services department.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisors have been meeting with local boards during Q3 to build relationships and develop Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Plans.

23.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum responds to requests from local board members to increase activity in this space and enables development and upskilling that is likely to have a positive impact on the final response plans that are produced.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     Auckland Emergency Management are working with marae to provide support in emergency preparedness activities and to identify marae that may be able to provide support to communities in response.

25.     Potential topics for 2024 Readiness and Response Forum include mana whenua engagement and suggestions for improving iwi involvement at the local level.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be delivered internally and will generate no costs. The group will not manage a budget or have a financial mandate.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     There is a risk that local board members who become members of the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum expect that they will play a central role in emergency response in the event of another weather event.

28.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum is an information-sharing forum, and the Terms of Reference are intended to clarify this, ensuring participants have a realistic expectation of the roles and responsibilities of membership.

29.     The Emergency Management Elected Members’ Guide (July 2023) is a key guiding document for elected members, providing detailed information on the role of elected members in emergency reduction, readiness, response and recovery activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     Local boards that wish to participate in the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will confirm which elected members they wish to appoint to the group.

31.     An initial Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be scheduled for July 2024.

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Terms of Reference for Readiness and Response Forum

161

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Anna Wallace – Head of Planning Auckland Emergency Management

Authorisers

Adam Maggs – General Manager Auckland Emergency Management

Oliver Roberts - Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 




Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors' Updates

File No.: CP2024/06187

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors to update the local board on Governing Body issues they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Standing Orders 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provides provision in the local board meeting for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillor Julie Fairey’s April 2024 - Ward Councillor Report.

b)      receive Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillor Christine Fletcher’s update.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillor Julie Fairey’s April 2024 - Ward Councillor Report

167

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 








Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2024/06189

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To facilitate an opportunity for the local board chairperson to provide a written and/or verbal update on projects, meetings and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 2.4.7, the chairperson will update board members by way of a report.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive Chairperson K Smith’s May 2024 update.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Board Members' Reports

File No.: CP2024/06190

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To facilitate an opportunity for local board members to provide a written update on projects and events attended since the previous month’s local board meeting and to discuss other matters of interest to the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is an information item and it is optional for board members to provide a written board member report for inclusion in the agenda.

3.       Local board members are recommended to use a Notice of Motion, rather than a Board Member Report, should a member wish to propose a recommendation or request action to be undertaken by staff.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive Deputy Chairperson M Watson’s Board Member Report for May 2024.

b)      receive local board members’ verbal/tabled Board Reports for May 2024.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Deputy Chairperson M Watson’s Board Member Report - May 2024

179

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 






Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa/Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar

File No.: CP2024/06191

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Albert-Eden Local Board with its Hōtaka Kaupapa/Governance Forward work programme calendar (the calendar).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The calendar for the Albert-Eden Local Board is appended to the report as Attachment A.  The calendar is updated monthly and reported to the local board’s business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Hōtaka Kaupapa/Governance Forward work programme calendar for May 2024.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board Hōtaka Kaupapa/Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar - May 2024

187

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 



Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 





Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2024/06192

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the local board to receive the records of its recent workshops held following the previous month’s local board business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 12.1.4, the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its workshops held since the previous month’s local board business meeting.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Records for the workshops held on 18 and 24 April 2024 and 2 and 9 May 2024.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Record - 18 April 2024

193

b

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Record - 24 April 2024

197

c

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Record - 2 May 2024

199

d

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Record - 9 May 2024

201

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 




Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 



Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 


 


 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Albert-Eden Local Board

a)      whakaae / agree to exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Albert-Eden Local Board feedback on Pools and Leisure Contract Model

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report relates to ongoing contract negotiations and should remain confidential until August, to ensure the awarding of contracts has been completed prior.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] See, for example, “How Much is Enough? The Ballot Order Effect and the Use of Social Science Research in Election Law Disputes”, R. Michael Alvarez and Betsy Sinclair, https://web.archive.org/web/20100615182629id_/http://home.uchicago.edu/~betsy/papers/eljalvarez.pdf

[2] In this analysis a ‘race’ refers to an election in a particular ward or local board in a particular year.

[3] By Ross Wilson in the RIMU Research and Evaluation Unit in 2023. It is noted that the RIMU research did not (and could not) separate out the effects of alphabetical order on the ballot slip, from the effects of alphabetical ordering of the directory of candidate profile statements. The candidate booklet cannot be randomised.

[4] https://thefacts.nz/all/alpha-bias-surnames-in-the-top-3-won-50-of-elections/