I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Upper Harbour Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 23 May 2024

9:30am

Upper Harbour Local Board Office
6-8 Munroe Lane
Albany
Auckland 0632 and Via Microsoft Teams

 

Upper Harbour Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Anna Atkinson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Uzra Casuri Balouch, JP

 

Members

Callum Blair

Kyle Parker

 

John Mclean

Sylvia Yang

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Max Wilde

Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

 

15 May 2024

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 4142684

Email: Max.Wilde@AucklandCouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Nau mai | Welcome                                                                                                        5

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies                                                                                         5

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest                                         5

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes                                                    5

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence                                                            5

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements                                                                                       5

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions                                                                                                5

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations                                                                    5

8.1     Auckland North Community and Development Incorporated - Community programmes and services                                                                                  5

8.2     Margaret Miles, QSM, JP - Fencing of the entire off-leash dog area at Sanders Reserve                                                                                                                  6

8.3     Hobsonville Community Trust - Proposal for a Whenuapai Community Hub - Update                                                                                                                   7

8.4     Greenhithe Community Trust -  Annual Update                                               7

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum                                                                      8

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business                                                              8

11        Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grants for 2024/2025  9

12        Deconstruction of Albany - The Hut Toilet (Not Public)                                          21

13        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Upper Harbour Local Board for quarter three 2023/2024                                                                                              29

14        Upper Harbour Local Grants Round Two and Multi-board Grants Round Two applications 2023/2024                                                                                              115

15        Local board appointment to Emergency Readiness and Response Forum       135

16        Local government elections 2025 – order of names on voting documents       143

17        Options for voting methods in local elections                                                       161

18        Upper Harbour Local Board views on the Fast-track Approvals Bill                  229

19        Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance forward work calendar                                        247

20        Workshop records                                                                                                     251

21        Auckland Transport - West Hub Bulletin                                                                265

22        Local Board Members' Reports - May 2024                                                            293

23        Te Whakaaro ki ngā Take Pūtea e Autaia ana | Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

24        Te Mōtini ā-Tukanga hei Kaupare i te Marea | Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public        297

C1       Upper Harbour Local Board feedback on Pools and Leisure Contract Model   297

 


1          Nau mai | Welcome

 

The Chairperson, A Atkinson, will open the meeting with a Karakia.

 

 

2          Ngā Tamōtanga | Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda an apology had been received from Member J Mclean.

 

 

3          Te Whakapuaki i te Whai Pānga | Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Te Whakaū i ngā Āmiki | Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)         whakaū / confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 2 May 2024 as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          He Tamōtanga Motuhake | Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Te Mihi | Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Ngā Petihana | Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Ngā Tono Whakaaturanga | Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Upper Harbour Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Auckland North Community and Development Incorporated - Community programmes and services

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an overview of Auckland North Community and Development Incorporated’s work across the Auckland region.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Fiona Brennan, General Manager Auckland North Community and Development Incorporated and Eva Chen, Community engagement – Ethnic Communities and Community Accounting, Auckland North Community and Developments Incorporated, representing Auckland North Community and Developments Incorporated, will be in attendance to provide an overview of Auckland North Community and Developments Incorporated’s work across the Auckland region. In particular, how Auckland North Community and Development Incorporated can benefit community organisations, its connections in the Upper Harbour Local Board area, specific alignments with local board priorities and how Auckland North Community and Development Incorporated can support local board outcomes.

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the deputation from Fiona Brennan, General Manager Auckland North Community and Development Incorporated and Eva Chen, Community engagement – Ethnic Communities and Community Accounting, Auckland North Community and Developments Incorporated, representing Auckland North Community and Developments Incorporated, and thank them for their attendance and presentation.

 

Attachments

a          Auckland North Community and Development presentation....................... 301

 

 

8.2       Margaret Miles, QSM, JP - Fencing of the entire off-leash dog area at Sanders Reserve

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a deputation from Margaret Miles, QSM, JP requesting that the entire off-leash dog area at Sanders Reserve be fenced. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Margaret Miles, QSM, JP will be in attendance to request that the entire off-leash dog area at Sanders Reserve be fenced.

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the deputation from Margaret Miles, QSO, JP and thank her for her attendance and presentation.

 

Attachments

a          Fencing of the off-leash dog area at Sanders Reserve presentation.......... 309

 

 

8.3       Hobsonville Community Trust - Proposal for a Whenuapai Community Hub - Update

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update from the Hobsonville Community Trust on the proposal for a Whenuapai Community Hub.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Gavin Gunston, Organisational Leader Hobsonville Community Trust and Ian Dalziell, Chairperson Hobsonville Community Trust, representing the Hobsonville Community Trust, will be in attendance to provide an update on progress, feedback and options for a proposed Whenuapai Community Hub and provide feedback on the location of the proposed Whenuapai Town Park  toilet facility.

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the deputation from Gavin Gunston, Organisational Leader Hobsonville Community Trust and Ian Dalziell, Chairperson Hobsonville Community Trust, representing the Hobsonville Community Trust, and thank them for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.4       Greenhithe Community Trust -  Annual Update

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update from the Greenhithe Community Trust. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Michelle Yates, Voluntary Secretary, Greenhithe Community Trust Board, Andrew Kerr, Board Member, Greenhithe Community Trust Board and Ivor Jacobsen, Board Member, Greenhithe Community Trust Board, representing the Greenhithe Community Trust,  will be in attendance to provide an update on the Greenhithe Community Trust.

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the deputation from Michelle Yates, Voluntary Secretary, Greenhithe Community Trust Board, Andrew Kerr, Board Member, Greenhithe Community Trust Board and Ivor Jacobsen, Board Member, Greenhithe Community Trust Board, representing the Greenhithe Community Trust and thank them for their attendance and presentation.

 

Attachments

a          Greenhithe Community Trust presentation.................................................. 319

 

 

 

9          Te Matapaki Tūmatanui | Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Ngā Pakihi Autaia | Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grants for 2024/2025

File No.: CP2024/01207

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To confirm Business Improvement District annual compliance against the Auckland Council BID Policy (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) as of 10 March 2024.

2.       To consider whether the local board should recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for the Business North Harbour Business Improvement District programme for the 2024/2025 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Business Improvement District - operating business associations within the local board area

3.       Business Improvement Districts are programmes where local business and property owners have agreed to work together to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

4.       The Business Improvement District Policy includes a total of 23 Requirements, 19 are the direct responsibility of the Business Improvement District and inform this report. As part of the 19 Requirements, the Business Improvement Districts are required to provide annual accountability reports which are due 10 March each year.

5.       The Business Improvement District annual accountability reports on public funds received by the Business Improvement District within the local board area for the 2022/2023 financial year and has a direct link to council’s Long-Term Plan 2024-2034 and year one of that process to strike the Business Improvement District targeted rates for 2024/2025.

6.       Upper Harbour Local Board has one Business Improvement District operating in their local area:

Table 1: Business Improvement District targeted rate sought 2024/2025

Incorporated Society Name

Proposed 2024/2025 Targeted Rate

Met Business Improvement District Policy annual accountability reports

 

Business North Harbour Inc

$822,084.90

ü

 

7.       Staff recommend that the local board supports Business North Harbour Business Improvement District receiving their targeted rate grant for 2024/2025 set by the Governing Body.

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      recommends to the Governing Body the setting of the 2024/2025 targeted rates for inclusion in the Long-Term Plan for the following Business Improvement District programme:

i)        $822,084.90 for Business North Harbour Business Improvement District.

 

Horopaki

Context

Business Improvement District (BID) Policy and BID targeted rate grant agreement.

 

8.       Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2022) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi includes a total of 23 Requirements, 19 are the direct responsibility of the BID-operating business association and inform this annual report. (Attachment A to the agenda report)

9.       The remaining four BID Policy Requirements set out the process for establishing, expanding, and discontinuing a BID programme; and determines rating mechanisms. These will be covered within individual BID local board reports.

10.     The BID Policy does not prescribe or measure standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for business association members to determine. Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

11.     The BID Policy is supported by a BID Targeted Rate Grant Agreement, a three-year agreement signed by both Auckland Council and each BID-operating business association’s executive committee. The agreement sets out the relationship between the parties, how payment will be made and that compliance with the BID Policy is mandatory. The agreement confirms the business associations independence from Auckland Council. All 51 BIDs have signed a BID Targeted Rate Grant Agreement for period 1 December 2022 to 30 December 2025.

12.     This report updates the local board on compliance with the 19 BID Policy Requirements that are the responsibility of the Business Improvement District (BID), with a focus on the BIDs annual accountability reporting (BID Policy Requirements 9, 11 and 18) relating to public funds received by the BID for the 2022/2023 financial year.

13.     This report includes a copy of the individual BIDs Governance Summary documents, Attachment B to the agenda report. These documents include the full resolution detailing the amount of BID targeted rate grant approved by association members at their 2023 AGM for the 2024/2025 financial year. The BID Chair also agrees, by signing this document, to advise council of any perceived or real/current issues that can affect compliance with the BID Policy.

BID Programmes

14.     Local BID programmes should provide value to the collective business community by delivering a suite of economic activities that respond to local needs and opportunities and are agreed by the local business community. BID programmes also provide the opportunity to work with the council group and engage with local boards.

15.     The BID programme does not replicate services provided by the council but channels the capabilities and knowledge of the private sector to improve economic outcomes and achieve common goals.

16.     Each business association operating a BID programme sets the BID targeted rate grant amount at its Annual General Meeting (AGM) when members vote to approve a detailed income and expenditure operational budget and business plan for the following financial year.

17.     Responsibility for delivery and outcomes of the BID programme sits with the individual BID-operating business association executive committee (provision of reporting information) and members (reviewing information provided to them by the executive committee).

18.     All BIDs are registered incorporated societies and need to be aware of the requirement to re-register by April 2026 under the updated Incorporated Societies Act 2022. 

Upper Harbour Local Board BID Targeted Rates 2024/2025

19.     Upper Harbour Local Board has one BID operating in their local board area. Table 2 shows the amount of targeted rate each BID had approved at their 2023 AGM for the 2024/2025 and linked to the council’s Long-Term Plan 2024 - 2034 and annual budget 2024/2025 approval process.

Table 2: BID targeted rate change in 2024/2025

Incorporated Society Name

Proposed 2024/2025 Targeted Rate

Change from previous year

Last year target rate amount was increased

Business North Harbour Inc

$822,084.90

5%

2023

 

Decision making

Auckland Council

20.     The recommendation in this report is put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the Long-Term Plan 2024 – 2034 and its striking (setting) of the 2024/2025 targeted rates.

21.     In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, the Governing Body is authorised to make the final decisions on what BID programme targeted rates, if any, to set in any particular year or property (in terms of the amount and the geographic area to be rated).

Local Boards

22.     Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body if it is satisfied that the BID is sufficiently complying with the BID Policy.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Regional overview

23.     The BID Policy has been in place since 2022 and applies to 51 BIDs across the ā-rohe, up from 50 BIDs reported in the 2023 report to local boards.

24.     Thirty-six BIDs increased their targeted rates 2024/2025 - between 2 per cent to 50 per cent - while 15 maintained the fiscal status quo.

25.     Of the 11 BIDs with income under the $120,000 minimum (BID Policy Requirement 4), two BIDs now meet this requirement as of 10 March 2024. Of the remaining nine BIDs, three have made no comment to increase their income. Five BIDs have increased their BID Targeted rate grant and are on track to meet this requirement by 1 July 2028 and one has indicated interest in a BID expansion project.

Regional BID Programme Growth

26.     Onehunga BID achieved a successful expansion ballot in February 2024. This will see them evolve from a retail-focused BID to encompass retail, commercial and industrial areas, with a significant growth in target rate commencing 1 July 2024.

27.     Kingsland BID has confirmed at their 2023 AGM they would implement a BID expansion project in 2024/2025.

28.     Grey Lynn Business Association will be holding a ballot later this year towards establishing as a new BID from 1 July 2025.

29.     Takanini Business Association is on track to progress their BID establishment project aiming to become a new BID from 1 July 2026.

BID 2024 Accountability Reporting process overview.

30.     Upon receipt of individual BID annual accountability documents, staff follow a set process that includes reviewing the documents provided for 10 March 2024 against the BID policy, analysing changes from the previous accountability period, and following up with BIDs on issues.

31.     Generic observations for the reporting periods accountability include:

·    limited local board discretionary funding was available which led to BIDs having a greater focus on efficiencies in their own BID budgets.

·    improving quality of annual discussions between local boards and BID-operating business associations. Less emphasis on operational aspects and more discussion on how they could collaborate together.

32.     The BID Policy, requirement 11, sets out the documents that form the annual accountability reporting documents for each BID. These documents confirm membership decision-making has taken place regarding the BID programme at the 2023 AGM. Other reporting requirements include the filing of annual financial statements with the Companies Office under the Incorporated Societies Act.

33.     The BID team observed this year BIDs have paid less attention to providing the required annual accountability documents by the 10 March 2024 due date, compared with the previous year. Fifty-one per cent (26) of BIDs successfully completed their annual accountability reporting by the due date of 10 March 2024. Forty-one per cent (21) received notification that they had missing information or documents and were provided an extension to the 10 March deadline. 

34.     Four BIDs failed to meet BID Policy Requirement 11 and did not complete annual accountability reporting.

35.     Requirements 9 and 18 of the BID Policy are focused on BID affiliates having access to BID programme information and the BID targeted rate spend. It specifies a range of information BIDs must ensure are easily and freely accessible on a suitable online platform.

36.     This year a one-off ‘Website Check List’ was added to the annual accountability reporting. 

Upper Harbour Local Board BIDs

37.     Using the documents and information submitted, the BID Team is satisfied that Business North Harbour BID has sufficiently met the BID Policy Requirements and the BID Policy for setting of the BID targeted rates for 2024/2025.

38.     Staff advise the local board to recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for 2024/2025 as set out in Table 1.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

39.     Through targeted rate-funded advocacy and activities, BID-operating business associations promote and can facilitate environmental sustainability programmes and climate response where appropriate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     Advocacy is a key service provided by business associations that operate a BID programme. BID-operating business associations ensure the views and ambitions of their members are provided to elected representatives and council teams, including council-controlled organisations, on those policies, plans, programmes, and projects that impact them.

41.     BIDs work with several council-controlled organisations (CCOs) including Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku and Tātaki Auckland Unlimited.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     The local board’s views are most frequently expressed by its appointed representative on the board of each BID-operating business association. This liaison board member (or alternates) can attend BID board meetings to ensure there is a direct link between the council and the operation of the BID programme.

43.     Business North Harbour BID programme best align with the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2023, Outcome: Our Economy

44.     Recommending that the Governing Body sets the targeted rates for Business North Harbour business association means that these BID programmes will continue to be funded from targeted rates on commercial properties in their respective rohe. They will provide services in accordance with their members’ priorities as stated in their strategic plans.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

45.     The BID Policy and the annual accountability process does not prescribe or report on individual BID programme’s effectiveness, outcomes, or impacts for Māori. However individual BIDs may include this level of detail in other reports provided to their members. This localised project reporting is not a requirement of the BID Policy and is not part of the BID Policy annual accountability reporting.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.     There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from business ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the associations every quarter.

47.     The targeted rate is payable by the owners of the business rated properties within the geographic area of the individual BID programmes. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     To sustain public trust and confidence in the council, the BID Policy sets out a balance between the independence of the BID-operating business associations and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

49.     For the council to be confident that the targeted rate grant funds provided to the BID-operating business associations are being used appropriately, it requires the BIDs to fully complete all annual accountability reporting and the 19 BID Policy Requirements that are the responsibility of the BID. 

50.     Council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy throughout the year including responding to queries and issues raised by council staff, members of the BID, the public and elected members.

51.     We actively grow relationships with council departments that interact with BID programmes to ensure a consistent approach is applied for the programme.

52.     The role of the local board representative is a key link between the parties involved in the BID programme in terms of communication and feedback.  Local Board representatives on BID programmes are strongly encouraged to contact the BID Team if they have any queries or concerns.

53.     This report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds. It provides an annual update that the BIDs operating within the local board area are compliant with the BID Policy.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

54.     If the local board supports this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the BID targeted rates be set as part of the Long-Term Plan 2024/2034 including the annual budget 2024/2025.

55.     After the targeted rates are approved, the council will collect the targeted rate funds effective from 1 July 2024 and distribute them in quarterly BID grant payment to Business North Harbour BID.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

BID Policy Requirements Summary

15

b

Business North Harbour Governance Summary to 10 March 2024

19

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Gill Plume - BID Senior Advisor

Claire Siddens - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 




Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Deconstruction of Albany - The Hut Toilet (Not Public)

File No.: CP2024/04163

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Upper Harbour Local Board to deconstruct the hut toilet (not public) and a small change room facility located at R575 Albany Highway, Albany Village.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The hut toilet and a small changing room facility located at R 575 Albany Highway, Albany Village is closed to the public and not useable in its current condition.

3.       The deconstruction of the hut toilet was identified by staff through an asset condition assessment.

4.       The asset assessment report in 2022 identified the poor condition of the asset, with extensive deterioration both externally and internally.

5.       A proposal to demolish the asset was presented and discussed with the Upper Harbour Local Board at a workshop in November 2023. The initial informal feedback received was in support to consider deconstructing the asset.

6.       The options that have been identified are:

a)         Do nothing – This is not a viable option the asset has reached very poor overall condition and by “doing nothing” the building will eventually fail.

b)         Demolish and make good - Renewal of the building is beyond economical repair for a reasonable future use. Demolish the existing facility and make good of the area.

c)         Demolish and replace – Demolishing the existing facility and replacing it with a new facility is not recommended as the use is minimal and not accessible for the public.

7.       Staff seek approval for the recommended option to deconstruct the asset, cease the services that the asset provides and reinstate the area to grass.

8.       If approved, the project will be forwarded for inclusion in a future Regional Operational Renewals and Demolitions (Opex) Work Programme and funded through a regional budget. Timing of the funding allocation will be subject to regional priorities and budget availability.

9.       If the toilet facility is deconstructed, the asset will be removed from the council’s asset database and the local board would need to allocate new capital funding to reinstate the asset at Albany Village if the decision was to replace the asset.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whakaae / approve the deconstruction of The Hut Toilet – (Not Public) and small changing room facility located at R 575 Albany Highway, Albany Village and reinstate the area to grass.

b)      tono / request the deconstruction project be considered for inclusion in a future Regional Operational Renewals and Demolitions Work Programme, which is funded through a regional operational budget.

c)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the Regional Operational Work Programme is subject to regional prioritisation and that the timing of the deconstruction of this asset is aiming to be within the financial year 2024/2025 should funding be approved.

d)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note that following deconstruction:

i)        the asset will be removed from the council’s asset database

ii)       local renewals budget will not be used to replace the asset or the service it provided

iii)      reinstatement of the asset will require new capital funding.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The hut toilet (not public) is located at R 575 Albany Highway, Albany Village. The asset is currently used by the Albany War Memorial Library staff and Albany Tennis Club (only on a Wednesday from 10:00 am to 12:30 pm on weekly basis).

11.     No other community group use the toilet/change room. The hut toilet (not public) is kept locked, and the keys are held by the Albany Tennis Club and Albany War memorial Library.

Figure 1 - Location plan of the asset

 

12.     The asset was built by Auckland Council in the 1950s, but it does not have heritage status. It lies between the Albany Coronation Hall and the Albany War Memorial Library buildings, adjacent to the tennis courts on the northern end of Albany Domain.

13.     The building is a single storey structure sitting on a concrete slab (the foundation). the structure is of timber frame construction and is covered by a corrugated iron roof and fibre cement and asbestos containing material (ACM), the material used externally is external wall cladding along with timber joinery.

14.     The condition of the asset has deteriorated over time and the building and equipment are in poor condition, posing health and safety risks to users.

15.     Noticeable defects are observed with holes and heavily corroded corrugated steel roofing and deterioration of the fibre cement external wall cladding (which has been confirmed as asbestos containing material (ACM).

Figure 2 – Below shows the “The hut toilet” and small change room – (not public)

 

 

 

A white building with a black roof

Description automatically generated    A building with a door and windows

Description automatically generated

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     A condition assessment was undertaken on 20 July 2022 that identified the asset in very poor condition with several issues:

a)   Roof – In poor condition and is ‘end of life’ - renewal.

b)   Stormwater system – renewal of gutters downpipes and new gulley and drainage.

c)   Walls – external wall cladding is asbestos containing material (ACM) and is beginning to

deteriorate – removal of cladding and reclad.

d)   External joinery – timber windows and doors and in very poor condition – renewal.

e)   Ceilings – basic hardboard ceiling – renewal.

f)    Walls – basic hardboard internal wall cladding – repaint.

g)   Floors – concrete/timber floor – renewal new floor covering.

h)   Fixtures and fittings – upgrade toilet and kitchen fixtures and fittings.

17.     The local board previously indicated a desire to renew the asset. However, this is not a recommended option as the asset has reached very poor overall condition and has minimal use or public benefit. The services provided from the asset can be delivered from the toilets located within the Albany Coronation Hall.

Public and stakeholder consultation / engagement

18.     Informal discussion with the users has been conducted and the option of using the toilet and change facility at the Albany Coronation Hall have been advised.

19.     Formal consultation with the local community has not been undertaken as the asset is not used by any community groups and is not open for public use.

Options assessment

20.     Options (including the status quo) were presented to the local board at a workshop held on 9 November 2023. An assessment of each option considering constraints, risks and estimated cost was tabled and discussed.

21.     A summary of all options is outlined in Table 1 below.

 

Table 1: Options assessment

Options

Advantages / disadvantages

Local board outcome alignment

Risk

Implementation

CAPEX

(estimate only)

OPEX

(estimate only)

Do nothing

Outcome 3: Our community

Building failure / Health and Safety risk

Not viable option

$0

$0

·    High operational maintenance costs

·    Building failure

Not a recommended option

Demolish and make good

Outcome 3: Our community

Removal of amenity – Service change

Create open space

Create open space

$0

$50,000 (regional Opex)

·    Demolish hazardous building at end of life

·    Not economic to renew

·    Removal of existing amenity

Recommended option to proceed

Demolish and replace

Outcome 3: Our community

New fit for purpose facility 

Overall affordability

Feasibility study and consultation re requirements.

Identify the ‘need’ for new facility fit for purpose for the space

$TBC

$50,000 (regional Opex)

·    Demolish hazardous building

·    End of life and beyond economic repair

·    Feasibility assessment and consultation required.

·    Budget shortfall

Not a recommended option

Preferred option

22.     As the asset no longer serves its purpose and is not identified as a need for this service in this location, staff recommend that the local board approve option (b) to deconstruct the toilet/change room facility.

23.     Removal of this asset will mean that the limited service it provides will cease, and the asset will be removed from council’s asset database. The local board would need to allocate new capital funding to reinstate the asset if the local board decision is to replace the current asset.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan sets out two core goals:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

25.     It is anticipated that there will be an increase in carbon emission from deconstruction, including contractor emissions. Staff will seek to minimise carbon and contractor emissions through implementing Auckland Council's sustainability guidelines.

26.     This includes maximising the upcycling and recycling of existing material, including the development of a Site-Specific Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Plan in accordance with the Auckland Council – Deconstruction and Salvage Specification.  

27.     Mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions will be achieved through sourcing of services locally where possible to reduce carbon emissions and include positives that will be incorporated in the project to improve impact on climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     Council staff from within Customer and Community Services (Parks and Community Facilities – operational management and maintenance, specialist asset assessment – asbestos, seismic, buildings, and structures), Plans and Places, and Healthy Waters have been consulted. Staff are supportive of the proposal option as it will reduce the maintenance costs and address health and safety concerns.

29.     Collaboration with staff will be ongoing to ensure that information sharing continues throughout the process.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     Staff discussed the current condition of the hut toilet (not public) and a small changing room facility and presented several options along with assessment of each option including constraints, risks, and estimated costs at the local board workshop on 9 November 2023. The local board indicated initial informal support for the deconstruction of the asset and reinstatement of the site to grass, which was recommended by the staff.

31.     The proposed deconstruction of the asset will potentially have a positive impact on park and tennis courts users by removal of an asset which is in an extremely poor condition and seldomly used.

32.     The asset has previously provided a service to the Albany War Memorial Library staff and one tennis club group who used the asset once a week. Once the asset is deconstructed, this service will no longer be available. Albany Coronation Hall provides an alternative facility which is approximately 100 meters from the current asset.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework and Local Board Plans.

34.     The recommended option as discussed in this report will benefit Māori and the wider community through the provision of quality open spaces and facilities that promote good health, by removing an unsafe facility and allowing a better, more widely used facility to be built. This will enable the fostering of family and community relationships and connection to the natural environment.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     High level indicative cost estimate for each option is included in the options assessment table (refer to table 1 under analysis and advice section of the report).

36.     If the preferred option is approved by the local board, a request will be made for the project to be included in the future regional Operational Renewals and Demolitions (Opex) Work Programme.

37.     This programme is subject to regional prioritisation and budget availability, and it may be some time before the deconstruction can be actioned. The draft work programme is aimed to be approved by the end of July 2024.

38.     Alternatively, the local board has the option to prioritise the deconstruction by using Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) Opex to fund the deconstruction.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     The following risks and mitigations have been considered:

Risks identified

Mitigation

Health & Safety

 

Public are exposed to unsafe conditions during deconstruction

Note health and safety measures that will be put in place to manage any risks.

Asbestos

Asbestos materials have been identified and will be insured that appropriate management and remedial measures will be taken.

Unhappy Users (Not Public)

Create and action a communication plan prior to the demolition works commencing.

Regulations 

 

Resource Consent 

Resource consent may be required for deconstruction. If required, the preparation and processing of this consent may have an impact on the timeframe for the project. 

Engagement 

Additional engagement with external stakeholders, iwi and the community would be undertaken as part of any resource consenting process. There would be a risk that individuals within the community may not be in support. This may delay the project and result in additional costs through the resource consent and engagement stages. 

Financial 

If resource consent is required, this will delay the project and result in additional costs. 

Budget constraints could see funding delays as other projects compete for funding and may have priority over this project.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     If the local board approves the option to deconstruct the asset and reinstate the area to grass, a request will be forwarded to appropriate staff to consider inclusion of the project in a future Regional Operational Renewals and Demolitions (Opex) Work Programme which is funded through regional operational budget.

41.     The draft work programme is scheduled to be approved by the end of July 2024 and the physical works will take place in financial year 2024/2025.

42.     The local board will be kept informed on progress and delivery timeframes through the Parks and Community Facilities monthly report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Prakash Thakur - Work Programme Lead, Parks and Community Facilities

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Parks and Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Upper Harbour Local Board for quarter three 2023/2024

File No.: CP2024/04650

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Upper Harbour Local Board with an integrated performance report for quarter three of the 2023/2024 financial year, 1 January 2024 – 31 March 2024.

2.       To approve the minor change to 2023/2024 customer and community services work programme for the Whenuapai Park Service Guidance (Activity ID 2989) to include a refresh of the Whenuapai section of the Upper Harbour Greenways Plan 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This report provides a retrospective overview of the financial and non-financial performance of Auckland Council, key challenges and any risks to delivery against the agreed 2023/2024 Upper Harbour Local Board work programmes for the period beginning 1 January 2024 – 31 March 2024 (quarter three).

4.       The work programmes are produced annually and align with the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes.

5.       The key activity updates from the 2023/2024 work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report) for the reporting period include:

·        construction of the roundabout on the corner of Joshua Carder Drive and Craig's Way was completed as part of Te Kori Scott Point – develop sustainable sports park (Stage 1a) (Activity ID 16182)

·        the Playground Renewal at Herald Island Reserve was completed (Activity ID 27868)

·        Fernhill Escarpment – renew walkway and wayfinding signage (Activity ID 20471) project was completed

·        the 2024 Upper Harbour Movies in Parks event was successfully delivered (Activity ID 1278)

·        the final Upper Harbour Local Parks Management Plan (Activity ID 1326) was approved at a business meeting, the plan was published online and handed over to relevant council teams to implement.

6.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided an update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred, or merged). There are no activities with a red status.

Whenuapai Park Service Guidance activity

7.       Whenuapai Park Service Guidance (Activity ID 2989) was approved as part of the 2023/2024 financial year Customer and Community Services Work Programme (Resolution number UH/2023/80).

8.       During a workshop with the Upper Harbour Local Board on 14 March 2024 officers provided an update on the project and received initial direction from the local board to conduct a refresh of the Whenuapai section of the Upper Harbour Greenways Plan 2019.

9.       It is recommended that the Upper Harbour Local Board approve the minor change to 2023/2024 customer and community services work programme for the Whenuapai Park Service Guidance (Activity ID 2989) to include a refresh of the Whenuapai section of the Upper Harbour Greenways Plan 2019 as follows:

·        Activity Description: Deliver a refresh of the Whenuapai section of the Upper Harbour Greenways Plan 2019 including targeted community engagement

·        Further Decision Points for LB: October 2024 – Workshop updated Parks and Service Guidance and greenways planning; May 2025 – Local Board to approve the Whenuapai section review to be included in the Upper Harbour Greenways Plan.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the performance report for quarter three ending 31 March 2024.

b)      approve the minor change to 2023/2024 customer and community services work programme for the Whenuapai Park Service Guidance activity (Activity ID 2989) to include a refresh of the Whenuapai section of the Upper Harbour Greenways Plan 2019 as follows:

i)        Activity Description: Deliver a refresh of the Whenuapai section of the Upper Harbour Greenways Plan 2019 including targeted community engagement

ii)       Further Decision Points for LB: October 2024 – Workshop updated Parks and Service Guidance and greenways planning; May 2025 – Local Board to approve the Whenuapai section review to be included in the Upper Harbour Greenways Plan

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Upper Harbour Local Board has approved 2023/2024 work programmes for the following operating departments:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Auckland Emergency Management (AEM)

·        Local Governance

11.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

12.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

 

13.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities in each departments work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes.

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

Key activity updates from quarter three

14.     The key achievements in the delivery of the Upper Harbour Local Board work programmes for 2023/2024 financial year during quarter three include:

·        Local crime prevention fund, safety initiatives investment – Upper Harbour (Activity ID 3993) – the allocated funding for this project was successfully allocated to the various community partners who will present progress reports to the local board during quarter two of the 2024/2025 financial year

·        Governance capacity building for community organisations – Upper Harbour (Activity ID 4013) – Meadowood Trust Board received two 2-hour governance training sessions facilitated by Threshold Management and nine people attended a workshop at Albany Community Hub aimed at organisations delivering support to communities across Upper Harbour who will be impacted by the new Incorporated Societies Act 2022

·        Upper Harbour Ethnic Peoples Plan (Activity ID 4015) – during quarter three a project brief outlining the scope and scale of the Upper Harbour Ethnic Peoples Plan was completed and the Asian Network Incorporated (TANI) has been identified as a delivery partner with a meeting to discuss contracting and delivery timelines scheduled for quarter four

·        Activation of community led venue partners Upper Harbour (Activity ID 404) – Albany Community Hub, Meadowood Community House, Sunderland Lounge – Te Rere and Headquarters – Te Mahere have all provided a quarterly activation report; additionally, Sunderland Lounge – Te Rere, Headquarters – Te Mahere, and Albany Community Hub have provided programming reports which are included in this report as Attachments C, D, E, F, G, H and I to the agenda report

·        Te Kori Scott Point – develop sustainable sports park (Stage 1a), (Activity ID 16182) – during quarter three construction of the roundabout on the corner of Joshua Carder Drive and Craig's Way was completed and the last section of road adjoining the roundabout is under construction

·        Starlight Park – renew play space (Activity ID 27886) – work on this project commenced during quarter three

·        Upper Harbour – renew sports field assets (Activity ID 30661) – the replacement of lights at Wainoni Park was completed during quarter three

·        Fernhill Escarpment – renew walkway and wayfinding signage (Activity ID 20471) – this project was completed during quarter three

·        Devonshire Reserve – Playground Renewal (Activity ID 24007) – this project was completed during quarter three and the garden planting will commence in quarter four

·        Herald Island Reserve - Playground Renewal (Activity ID 27868) – this project was completed during quarter three

·        Movies in Parks - Upper Harbour (Activity ID 1278) - the 2024 Upper Harbour Movies in Parks event was successfully delivered during quarter three at Luckens Reserve to an estimated audience of 2,000

·        Upper Harbour Local Parks Management Plan (Activity ID 1326) – during quarter three the Hearing Panel finalised their report to the local board recommending changes to the plan, the final plan was approved at a business meeting and the plan was published online and handed over to relevant council teams to implement

·        Continue to monitor opportunities for Albany library service provision (Activity ID 1501) – during quarter three Auckland Council's geotechnical team undertook the investigation; findings will be summarised and an update on the investigation will be provided to the local board in quarter four of this financial year.

Activities with some risk or issues

15.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as having some risk or issues that are being managed and have been given an Amber RAG status:

·        Albany Plan (Activity 4014) – this project has been given an Amber RAG status as there is significant risk that the delivery of the project will be after the end of the 2023/2024 financial year, and funding may need to be carried forward to enable the completion of the project in 2024/2025. Further discussions will take place to refine the scope of this project with the local board in quarter four.

·        Rosedale Park - develop tree management plan (Activity ID 42277) – this project has been given an Amber RAG status as a precaution due to the delivery of the tree management plan occurring in quarter four. This precaution allows for consideration of any potential carry forwards into quarter one of 2024/2025 should completion of this project require it.

Activities on hold

16.     The following work programme activity has been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·    Upper Harbour implement actions from the Greenways Plan (Activity ID 20709) – this project continues to have an Amber RAG status and remains on hold while scoping the new pathway extension from the end of Wharf Road to the existing footpath in Wharf Reserve is being carried out under the Wharf Reserve - renew walkways project (Activity ID  25966). Construction of the Wharf Reserve walkway (Activity ID  25966) is expected to begin in the 2024/2025 financial year.

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

17.     The following activity is deferred from the current work programme into future years:

·    Rahui Reserve - Tauhinu Sea Scouts (Activity ID 3730) – this project is for a new lease for Tauhinu Sea Scouts at Rahui Reserve which following staff advice will be deferred until 2025/2026. Deferral of this item is to account for the impact on providing a future lease for the site when the sea scouts coastal permit expires in 2029. Officers’ recommendation is to defer the lease at Rahui Reserve for the sea scouts until later work programmes in consideration of the expiry of their coastal permit in 2029 and any potential issues that may arise.

Cancelled activities

18.     The following activity is cancelled:

·        Upper Harbour - remediate storm and cyclone affected assets (Activity ID 40192) – the approved CAPEX renewal budget for this project is no longer required and will be re-allocated through the work programme development. A separate storm CAPEX damage budget has been allocated centrally and will be used to remediate storm damaged assets during the 2023/2024 financial year under the work programme activity Upper Harbour - Storm Capex Damage – Renewal (Activity ID 45727).

Activities with changes

19.     The following work programmes activities have changes which have been formally approved by the board.

Table 1: Work programmes change formally approved by the board

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

Activity Name

Summary of Change

Resolution number

410

 

Customer and Community Services

Community grants Upper Harbour

Community Grants received $18,970 of returned LDI Opex budget from 2021/2022 community grants rounds. $15,970 of the returned LDI Opex budget was allocated to Community Grants Upper Harbour bringing the total funding available for the remainder of 2023/2024 to $44,809.76. The remaining balance of $3,000 returned LDI Opex budget was allocated to Rosedale Park - develop tree management plan (Activity ID 42277)

UH/2024/10

 

42277

Customer and Community Services

Rosedale Park - develop tree management plan

$3,000 of LDI Opex budget was allocated to this project from returned funding from the 2021/2022 community grants rounds – bringing the total funding to $8,000

 

UH/2024/10

 

4015

Customer and Community Services

Upper Harbour Ethnic Peoples Plan

The Activity Description on the 2023/2024 work programme for this project was amended to include the following wording: this programme will also support ongoing implementation of outcomes for ethnic people during the development of the plan

UH/2024/10

 

20.     The following work programmes activities have been amended to reflect minor change, the implications of which are reported in the table below. The local board was informed of these minor changes and they were made by staff under delegation.

Table 2: Minor change to the local board work programmes

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

Activity Name

Change

Reason for change

45727

Customer and Community Services

Upper Harbour - Storm Capex Damage – Renewal

This activity has been included as a new project in the quarter three reporting

Upper Harbour - Storm Capex Damage – Renewal

has been centrally approved as a storm response budget replacing Upper Harbour - remediate storm and cyclone affected assets (Activity ID 40192) which has been cancelled

 

727

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Our Local streams Sustainable Schools

The Activity Description on the Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme 2023/2024 for this project was amended to: To continue to provide expertise and assistance for five schools to connect with their local streams

The wording was amended to reflect the correct number of schools in the programme as due to an administrative error the approved description stated there were eight schools in the programme for this financial year when there are five

Whenuapai Park Service Guidance activity

21.     Whenuapai Park Service Guidance (Activity ID 2989) was approved as part of the 2023/2024 financial year Customer and Community Services Work Programme (Resolution number UH/2023/80).

22.     The approved Activity Description of the Whenuapai Park Service Guidance (Activity ID 2989) is as follows:

·        Prepare a plan of indicative local park services provision to meet the needs of the growing population in the Whenuapai area and to help provide guidance for development processes; including investigation of interim public access to local parks for example at Trig and Spedding Roads prior to development.

23.     During a workshop with the Upper Harbour Local Board on 14 March 2024 officers provided an update on the project and received initial direction from the local board to conduct a refresh of the Whenuapai section of the Upper Harbour Greenways Plan 2019.

24.     Officers’ advice is to update the scope of the Whenuapai Park Service Guidance (Activity ID 2989) project to include a refresh of the Whenuapai section of the Upper Harbour Greenways Plan 2019.

25.     It is recommended that the Upper Harbour Local Board approve the minor change to 2023/2024 customer and community services work programme for the Whenuapai Park Service Guidance activity (Activity ID 2989) to include a refresh of the Whenuapai section of the Upper Harbour Greenways Plan 2019 as follows:

·        Activity Description: Deliver a refresh of the Whenuapai section of the Upper Harbour Greenways Plan 2019 including targeted community engagement

·        Further Decision Points for LB: October 2024 – Workshop updated Parks and Service Guidance and greenways planning; May 2025 – Local Board to approve the Whenuapai section review to be included in the Upper Harbour Greenways Plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

27.     Work programmes were approved in July 2023 and September 2023 and delivery is underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate change impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. Any changes to the timing of approved projects are unlikely to result in changes to emissions.

28.     The local board is invested in a number of sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around sustainable practices, and support changing behaviour at a local level, which include:

·        Library services - Upper Harbour (Activity ID 1110) – Albany Village Library provide facility community based services and programmes including activities which promote sustainability and during quarter three the ‘Chip Packet Project NZ’ gave a talk about foil reduction into landfill and demonstrated turning empty wrappers into lightweight, warming blankets for vulnerable people with Albany Library becoming a collection point for the community to donate foil wrappers

·        Upper Harbour Ecological volunteers and environmental programme FY24 (Activity ID 595) – in quarter three there were 2,619 recorded volunteer hours in local reserves and community events included – community trap installation and trapping workshops at Sanders Reserve, Upper Waitematā coastal cleanup, chicken enclosure installation at Rosedale Park, and Volunteer trap installations at Burnside Reserve

·        Industrial Pollution Prevention Programme – Upper Harbour (Activity ID 4017) – aims to inform industry about the impacts that their activities may be having on local waterways and in quarter three the programme commenced with 80 businesses visited and 21 receiving reports detailing required changes to their practices in order to prevent pollution

·        Ecology initiatives assistance programme Upper Harbour (Activity ID 716) – provides continued support for conservation projects proposed by the community, as part of the implementation of the Upper Harbour Ecological Connectivity Strategy; quarter three highlights include 135 volunteer hours on moth plant control and a coastal clean-up by Living Whenuapai, 245 volunteer hours on pest plant control by Habitat Hobsonville, 420 recorded volunteer hours from Greenhithe community trust, 40 volunteer hours and one pest animal trapping work shop form Sustainable Paremoremo,  and a pest animal control workshop facilitated by Upper Waitemata Ecology Network.

·        Our Local Streams Sustainable Schools (Activity ID 727) – provides expertise and assistance in stream care to schools and during quarter three delivery is under way at Albany Senior High School, Oteha Valley School, Westminster Christian School and Rangitoto College with delivery at Greenhithe School scheduled for term two

·        Construction Waste Education and Leadership Upper Harbour (Activity ID 1441) – has established a construction and demolition waste advisor to work with developers to improve site practices; during quarter three 62 small construction sites and 14 large sites were visited, ten onsite incidences were referred to Auckland Council Compliance for investigation and enforcement and there were eight incidences of illegal dumping reported.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     This report informs the Upper Harbour Local Board of the performance for quarter three of 2023/2024 financial year – from 1 January 2024 to 31 March 2024.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     The Upper Harbour Local Board’s work programme contains a number of activities aimed at delivering on Māori outcomes for the 2023/2024 financial year.

32.     Highlights for the quarter two reporting period on activities with a direct focus on Māori outcomes are outlined below:

·        Māori responsiveness Upper Harbour (Activity ID 403) – aims to support local Māori in delivering social and economic outcomes and during quarter three Te Ohu o Onekiritea have worked in partnership with Te Kawerau ā Maki to further develop a story telling project with local schools in Hobsonville; which will include a display of artwork produced by Hobsonville Point Primary school and supported by narratives produced by Hobsonville Point Secondary school.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     This report is provided to enable the Upper Harbour Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2023/2024 work programme. There are no financial implications associated with this report.  

Financial Performance

34.     For the first 9 months of 2023/2024, Locally Driven Initiatives operational projects totalled $135,000 below budget, mostly due to timing of spend and delivery being in the last quarter of the year. Operating expenditure exceeded budget by $1 million in Asset Based Services expenditure largely due to operations at the Albany Stadium Pool and maintenance costs for local parks, facilities and open spaces.

35.     Capital spend of $8.3 million was $5 million ahead of the year to date budget, primarily due to investment in the construction of Te Kori/Scott Point sustainable sports park, which is progressing significantly ahead of plan and is funded from the 3 year Local Parks and Sportsfield Development (growth) programme.

36.     The complete Upper Harbour Local Board financial performance report as at 31 March 2024 can be found in Attachment B to the agenda report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

38.     The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

39.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with some issues or risks’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter four (30 June 2024).

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

UH Q3_Attachment A WP Update final

39

b

Upper Harbour Quarterly Performance Report Q3 FY24 Fin Appendix

71

c

Albany Com Hub Activation Q3 - 2024

77

d

Meadowood community House activation Q3 - 2024

83

e

Sunderland Lounge Activation - Q3 - 2024

89

f

Headquarters Activation - Q3-2024

97

g

Sunderland programming Q3 - 2024

103

h

Headquarters programming Q3 - 2024

107

i

Albany Com Hub Programming Q3 - 2024

111

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Robert Marshall - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

































Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 






Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 






Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 






Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 








Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 






Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 




Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 




Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 




Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

      

Upper Harbour Local Grants Round Two and Multi-board Grants Round Two applications 2023/2024

File No.: CP2024/05086

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the allocation of grant refunds from three funding recipients of previous grant rounds

2.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Upper Harbour Local Boards Local Grants Round Two and Multi-board Grants Round Two applications in 2023/2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       At the 27 July 2023 business meeting, the local board adopted the Upper Harbour Local Grants Programme 2023/2024 as presented in Attachment A to the agenda report. The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

4.       This report presents applications received in the Upper Harbour Local Board Local Grants Round Two (Attachment B to the agenda report) and Multi-board Grants Round Two (Attachment C to the agenda report) in 2023/2024.

5.       The Upper Harbour Local Board had set a total of $100,000 community grants budget at the start of the 2023/2024 financial year.

·    An additional $26,000 was allocated to Community Grants work programme from Locally Driven Initiatives operational budget in the 14 September 2023 business meeting (Resolution Number UH/2023/109). This took the budget to $126,000 to be allocated to the two local grant rounds and two Multi-board rounds for 2023/2024.

·    At the 26 October 2023 business meeting, a total of $50,360.24 was allocated to Upper Harbour Local Grant Round One and Multi-board Grant Round One (Resolution number UH/2023/135).

·    At the 30 November 2023 business meeting a total of $46,800 was reallocated from Community Grants to fund a Geotechnical assessment report at the Albany Pool Stadium site identified for a new library facility in Albany (Resolution number UH/2023/149).

·    At the 27 February 2024 business meeting a total of $15,970 was allocated from the previous grant refund to Community Grants Upper Harbour (Activity ID 410) bringing the total funding available for the remainder of 2023/2024 to $44,809.76 (Resolution number UH/2024/10).

6.       Three funding recipients from the previous grants funding rounds have returned funding totalling $9,498.50, it is recommended this amount can be reallocated to current 2023/2024 community grant round bringing the total grants funding available for allocation to $54,308.26.

7.       Twenty-three applications were received for Upper Harbour Local Board Local Grants Round Two and requesting $189,793.90. Sixteen applications were received for the Multi-board Grants Round Two requesting $68,244.32.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      allocate the total amount of $9,498.50 returned from previous grant rounds to the current community grants budget, bringing the total funding available for the remainder to $54,308.26,

b)      whakaae / agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in the Upper Harbour Local Board Boards Local Grants Round Two applications 2023/2024, listed below:

App ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2417-201

New Zealand BaiYun Beijing Opera Society Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire, fuel, cosmetics for performers, instrument and related cost, and office supplies for New Zealand BaiYun Beijing Opera Society Incorporated operating cost from 1 June 2024 to 31 May 2025

$6,100.00

Eligible

LG2417-203

Meadowood House Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards renew the junior playground surface at Meadowood Community Centre from 2 September 2024 to 1 October 2024

$38,000.00

Eligible

LG2417-204

Business North Harbour Incorporated

Environment

Towards bin liners, food waste bin, waste collections, advertising cost to deliver Foodwaste Management Programme driven from Business North Harbour from 1 July 2024 to 30 June 2025

$4,445.85

Eligible

LG2417-206

North Harbour Synchronised Swimming Club

Sport and recreation

Towards purchasing an iPad for swim training purpose at Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre from 22 July 2024

$2,367.00

Eligible

LG2417-207

Tennis Seniors North Harbour

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire, tennis balls, and catering cost to deliver TSNH Winter Indoor Tournament July 2024 at Albany Tennis Park from 10 June 2024 to 31 July 2024

$2,848.00

Eligible

LG2417-208

Albany Community Action Trust T/A ABC Toy Library

Community

Towards venue hire, food and drink, parenting tool box course and facilitator cost for parents support at Albany Community Hub from 5 August 2024 and 28 October 2024

$1,278.00

Eligible

LG2417-210

Greenhithe Tennis Club Inc

Sport and recreation

Towards tennis balls at Greenhithe Tennis Club from 1 June 2024 to 31 August 2024

$4,478.00

Eligible

LG2417-211

Kaipātiki Project Incorporated

Environment

Towards eDNA test, project delivery staff time, mileage, project operation support, Manaakitanga and promotion cost to deliver Community Regeneration of Waipareira Bay - Clearwater Cove project from 1 July 2024 to 30 June 2025

$5,300.00

Eligible

LG2417-212

Brain Injury Association Auckland Incorporated

Community

Towards a contribution of a Community Educator and a Community Navigator at Harbour Sport and Hobsonville Community Trust from 1 July 2024 to 30 June 2025

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2417-213

Ministry of Inspiration

Events

Towards pool hire cost to hold NZAquaBots Nationals event at AUT Millennium from 30 November 2024 to 1 December 2024

$5,500.00

Eligible

LG2417-214

Abby Storey

Arts and culture

Towards website hosting, brochure design, marketing and social media planning workshop to deliver ArtPoint project in Hobsonville Point from 2 July 2024 to 3 December 2024

$4,879.55

Eligible

LG2417-216

Greenhithe Football Club

Sport and recreation

Towards purchase football goal posts for Greenhithe Football Club from 1 June 2024

$5,473.00

Eligible

LG2417-217

Albany Chinese Association Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards food, car rental, financial reporting, event material, tutor fee and venue hire to run Albany Chinese Association at Albany Community Hub from 1 June 2024 to 19 December 2024

$5,940.00

Eligible

LG2417-218

Momentum Charitable Trust

Community

Towards cost to run four one-day life and financial skills programmes at Auckland Prison from 3 June 2024 to 31 July 2024

$6,780.00

Eligible

LG2417-219

West Harbour Tennis Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards upgrading the lights in lit courts to LED system at West Harbour Tennis Club from 1 July 2024 to 31 October 2024

$52,636.00

Eligible

LG2417-220

Greenhithe Playcentre

Environment

Towards plants, soil, garden bed, bird bath, water tank and related cost for Greenhithe Playcentre Gardening Project from 1 June 2024 to 21 July 2024

$2,500.00

Eligible

LG2417-221

Element One Charitable Trust

Community

Towards cost of backpacks for students across west and northwest schools from 1 October 2024 to 1 February 2025

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2417-222

Greenhithe Riding For The Disabled Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards wood chip horse bedding, sand, fencing tape and standards for horse facilities refurbishment at Wainoni Park from 8 July 2024 to 21 July 2024

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2417-223

East Coast Bays Cricket Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards a contribution of Club Coaching and Development Manager contract costs for East Coast Bays Cricket from 2 June 2024 to 1 August 2024

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG2417-224

Greenhithe Community Trust

Community

Towards advertise banners and first aid courses to deliver Greenhithe Community Safety and Resilience and Connection programme in Greenhithe from 3 June 2024 to 25 October 2024

$1,762.00

Eligible

LG2417-225

Upper Waitemata Ecology Network Incorporated

Environment

Towards purchase of outdoor wear for the Pest Coordinator and Network Manager with the UWEN logo printed from 1 July 2024 to 30 September 2024

$506.50

Eligible

LG2417-226

Amar Trivedi

Events

Towards event equipment, stage set up, venue cleaning, event service fee and marketing to deliver Hobsonville Diwali Festival at Catalina Bay on 9 November 2024

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2417-227

Action Education Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards operational cost to deliver twenty Spoken Word Poetry workshops at Hobsonville Point Secondary School from 10 June 2024 to 13 December 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$189,793.90

 

 

 

c)      whakaae / agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in the Upper Harbour Local Board Boards Multi-board grants Round Two applications 2023/2024, listed below:

App ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2324-2100

Feelings for Life Charitable Trust

Community

Towards graphic design, videographer, workshop materials, participant resources, facilitator and advisor, administrator and event manager, venue hire, catering, and AV for the Kaiako Hauora North Programme

$3,539.00

Eligible

MB2324-2103

North Harbour Community Patrol

Community

Towards annual operating expenses, including fuel costs, vehicle maintenance, uniforms, equipment, telephones, software, computers, and internet costs

$2,500.00

Eligible

MB2324-2104

Anxiety New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards postage, printing cost, reimbursement of clinical backup team for practical expenses for Anxiety NZ Trust from 1 May 2024 to 30 September 2024

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-216

Age Concern Auckland Trust

Community

Towards wages at 57 Rosebank Road from 1 May 2024 to 30 April 2025

$3,057.00

Eligible

MB2324-217

NZ Council of Victim Support Groups

Community

Towards overall operational expenses

$956.00

Eligible

MB2324-221

The Operating Theatre Trust trading as Tim Bray Theatre Company

Arts and culture

Towards ticket cost for disabled or disadvantaged children to attend Mrs Wishy Washy show from 21 September 2024 to 26 October 2024

$4,891.50

Eligible

MB2324-222

Environmental Education for Resource Sustainability Trust

Environment

Towards cost of native trees and classroom recycling bins to deliver Paper4trees Auckland from 1 April 2024 to 31 August 2024

$3,075.82

Eligible

MB2324-224

The Re-Creators Limited

Community

Towards cost of rent, tools, equipment, admin, tutor, project management, marketing to deliver Community DIY skills-based upcycling workshops from 1 May 2024 to 27 September 2024

$4,725.00

Eligible

MB2324-236

The StarJam Charitable Trust

Community

Towards venue hire, tutor fee and Auckland regional programme coordinator salaries and levies to deliver Music Workshops, Community Social Events and Performances deliver from 1 May 2024 to 1 May 2025

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-242

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards specialist contractor fees for volunteer and triage support staff supervision

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-250

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

Community

Towards accommodation, radio advertising, mentor manager wage and volunteers psychological screening for programme delivery from 30 September 2024 to 30 August 2025

$6,500.00

Eligible

MB2324-251

Garden to Table Trust

Community

Towards salaries, mileage, and home office costs for the Garden to Table Food Education Programme

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-255

Unlabeled Limited

Community

Towards home office, accountancy, cell phone, developer program, banking, marketing, translations, web hosting app and web hosting site and equipment cost for Rokket - tool adaptation and support for digital inclusion from 1 May 2024 to 30 April 2025

$11,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-273

Auckland Softball Association Inc.

Sport and recreation

Towards a proportion of annual operating expenses excluding salaries

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2324-293

Young Workers Resource Centre

Community

Towards wages for employing an education coordinator

$10,000.00

Ineligible

MB2324-297

YES Disability Resource Centre Services Trust T/A Shore Junction

Community

Towards a contribution of youth worker wage for Shore Junction from 1 June 2024 to 21 December 2024

$5,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$68,244.32

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world-class city.

9.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·   local board priorities

·   lower priorities for funding

·   exclusions

·   grant types, the number of grant rounds, and when these will open and close

·   any additional accountability requirements.

10.     The Upper Harbour Local Board adopted the Upper Harbour Local Grants Programme 2023/2024 as presented in Attachment A to the agenda report. The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

11.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

13.     Three funding recipients from the previous grants funding rounds have returned funding totalling $9,498.50 as outlined in the table 1 below:

Table 1: returned funding from community grants

Application Number

Amount

Applicant

Reason

LG2317-230

$257.00

Greenhithe Football Club

Due to lack of referee, the funding could not be fully utilised.

LG2317-234

$3,532.00

Harbour Sport Trust

Project only partially delivered due to delay on the dates, programme did not reach the excepted number of participants.

LG2117-215

$5,709.50

Amar Trivedi

Event partially cancelled due to Covid.

Total Amount

$9,498.50

 

14.     The amount requested from Upper Harbour Local Grant Round Two is $189,793.90, the amount requested from Multi-board Grants Round Two is $68,244.32. The grant rounds are oversubscribed.

15.     Staff recommend the $9,498.50 refunded amount to be reallocated to the current community grant budget for the oversubscribed Local Grant Round Two and Multi-board Grant Round Two, bringing the total funding available to allocate to $54,308.26.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action.

17.     Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts.

18.     Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment, or heritage. Based on the focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice.

20.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Upper Harbour Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

22.     The local board is requested to note that section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states:
“We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

23.     A summary of each application received through 2023/2024 Upper Harbour Local Grants Round One (Attachment B to the agenda report) and Multi-board Grants Round One (Attachment C to the agenda report) is provided.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to the council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     The Upper Harbour Local Board adopted the Upper Harbour Local Grants Programme 2023/2024 as presented in Attachment A to the agenda report. The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

26.     The Upper Harbour Local Board had set a total of $100,000 community grants budget at the start of the 2023/2024 financial year.

·    An additional $26,000 was allocated to Community Grants work programme from Locally Driven Initiatives operational budget in the 14 September 2023 business meeting (Resolution number UH/2023/109). This took the budget to $126,000 to be allocated to the two local grant rounds and two Multi-board rounds for 2023/2024.

·    At the 26 October 2023 business meeting, a total of $50,360.24 was allocated to Upper Harbour Local Grant Round One and Multi-board Grant Round One (Resolution number UH/2023/135).

·    At the 30 November 2023 business meeting a total of $46,800 was reallocated from Community Grants to fund a Geotechnical assessment report at the Albany Pool Stadium site identified for a new library facility in Albany (Resolution number UH/2023/149).

·    At the 27 February 2024 business meeting a total of $15,970 was allocated from the previous grant refund to Community Grants Upper Harbour (Activity ID 410) bringing the total funding available for the remainder of 2023/2024 to $44,809.76 (Resolution number UH/2024/10).

27.     Three funding recipients from the previous grants funding rounds have returned funding totalling $9,498.50, it is recommended this amount can be reallocated to current 2023/2024 community grant round bringing the total grants funding available for allocation to $54,308.26.

28.     Twenty-three applications were received for Upper Harbour Local Board Local Grants Round Two and requesting $189,793.90. Sixteen applications were received for the Multi-board Grants Round Two requesting $68,244.32.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     Following the Upper Harbour Local Board allocating funding for these grants, staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2023/2024 Upper Harbour Local Board Grant Programme

127

b

2023/2024 Upper Harbour Local Grant Round Two Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

2023/2024 Upper Harbour Multi-board Grant Round Two Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Amber Deng - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 








Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Local board appointment to Emergency Readiness and Response Forum

File No.: CP2024/05181

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To make appointments for participation in a Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Forum, coordinated by Auckland Emergency Management.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The role that local board members play during an emergency is becoming an increasingly important element of emergency management.

3.       To support this role, a Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Forum is proposed.

4.       The terms of reference (Attachment A to the agenda report) show that the forum will have no decision-making role or budgetary responsibility. The vision will be “local board members with an interest in emergency management working together to strengthen their role in emergency readiness and response.”

5.       The forum will provide participants with opportunities to learn more about readiness and response in a collaborative environment, to increase their capacity to advocate for readiness and response measures, and to provide informal guidance to staff on related issues.

6.       After local boards make their appointments, an initial Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be scheduled for July 2024.

7.       Staff recommend the forum meet three times a year. Additional meetings can be arranged if there is urgent content that requires discussion between scheduled forum sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      kopou / appoint up to three members to participate in the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Following the weather events of January and February 2023, Auckland Emergency Management was subject to several reviews and various recommendations.

9.       Part of the implementation of the recommendations included the establishment of a Planning Unit and an associated Community Planning and Readiness Manager, with a team of seven Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisors, to support readiness and preparedness at the local level.

10.     The Head of Planning Unit commenced 15 January 2024, and appointments to the Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisor roles were made in late 2023, with the last Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisor commencing their role early February 2024.

11.     All local boards have expressed a desire to be more involved in readiness and response, and to be upskilled in advance of another catastrophic weather event.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Local board members are passionate about ensuring the best outcomes for their communities before, during, and following an emergency.

13.     A number of gaps have been identified where, during an emergency, local board members did not have the information they needed to best support their communities and the emergency response. Recent events also highlighted the importance of community readiness, and the role that people played to support each other during a response.

14.     In response to this, the Auckland Emergency Management Planning Manager has written terms of reference (Attachment A to the agenda report) to set out the parameters of an Emergency Readiness and Response Forum, intended to provide elected members with opportunities to:

·    learn more about emergency readiness and response

·    share relevant knowledge with other local board members and with their communities

·    improve connections between participants at a governance level

·    encourage collaboration between local boards to support emergency readiness and response outcomes

·    provide informal guidance to staff in regard to emergency readiness and response

·    share relevant insights with other members of their local boards, as appropriate.

15.     The vision of the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum is “local board members with an interest in emergency management work together to strengthen their role in emergency readiness and response”.

16.     Local boards are invited to appoint up to three members to the forum. Participation is at the discretion of local boards, with no obligation to appoint members. Local boards that choose not to appoint any members to the group will receive minutes and be able to watch recording of forum meetings.

17.     The group will have no decision-making role or budgetary oversight.

18.     The terms of reference set out details of meetings and communication for the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum and provide further information about the roles and responsibilities of participants. Staff advice is for the group to meet three times a year, but the meeting frequency and schedule will be confirmed in consultation with the participating elected members.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The formation and operation of the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum has no direct climate impact, particularly as the group will meet online only.

20.     The impacts of climate change on weather patterns mean that catastrophic weather events are likely to become more frequent. Response and readiness will form a significant part of ensuring that impacts on our communities are mitigated where possible.

 

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be administered by staff from the council’s Auckland Emergency Management team, with support from kaimahi in the Local Board Services department.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     Senior Community Planning and Readiness Advisors have been meeting with local boards during quarter three to build relationships and develop Local Board Emergency Readiness and Response Plans.

23.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum responds to requests from local board members to increase activity in this space and enables development and upskilling that is likely to have a positive impact on the final response plans that are produced.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     Auckland Emergency Management are working with marae to provide support in emergency preparedness activities and to identify marae that may be able to provide support to communities in response.

25.     Potential topics for 2024 Readiness and Response Fora include mana whenua engagement and suggestions for improving iwi involvement at the local level.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be delivered internally and will generate no costs. The group will not manage a budget or have a financial mandate.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     There is a risk that local board members who become members of the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum expect that they will play a central role in emergency response in the event of another weather event.

28.     The Emergency Readiness and Response Forum is an information-sharing forum, and the Terms of Reference are intended to clarify this, ensuring participants have a realistic expectation of the roles and responsibilities of membership.

29.     The Emergency Management Elected Members’ Guide (July 2023) is a key guiding document for elected members, providing detailed information on the role of elected members in emergency reduction, readiness, response and recovery activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     Local boards that wish to participate in the Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will confirm which elected members they wish to appoint to the group.

31.     An initial Emergency Readiness and Response Forum will be scheduled for July 2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Terms of Reference for Readiness and Response Forum

139

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Anna Wallace - Head of Planning Auckland Emergency Management

Authorisers

Adam Maggs - General Manager Auckland Emergency Management

Oliver Roberts – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 




Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Local government elections 2025 – order of names on voting documents

File No.: CP2024/05614

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback to the Governing Body on how names should be arranged on the voting documents for the Auckland Council 2025 elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 provide a local authority the opportunity to decide by resolution whether the names on voting documents are arranged in:

·    alphabetical order of surname;

·    pseudo-random order; or

·    random order.

3.       Pseudo-random order means names are listed in a random order and the same random order is used on every voting document.

4.       Random order means names are listed in a random order and a different random order is used on every voting document.

5.       The overseas findings on ballot order effects is controversial[1] and based on elections that differ to local government elections in New Zealand. Auckland Council has based its decisions in the past on its own statistical analysis of previous election results.

6.       The order of names has been alphabetical for the 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019 and 2022 Auckland Council elections. From 2016, prior to each election a statistical analysis was conducted by RIMU Research and Evaluation Unit on the results of previous elections which each time has concluded that there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected. The focus was on whether there was any advantage to being listed first.

7.       RIMU extended the scope of the statistical analysis this time to include list positions other than first, and also the effects of “race[2] length”. This takes into account the number of candidates standing for a particular election race. The analysis confirms previous results in terms of candidates listed first but has found that where there are a larger number of candidates, being lower on the list in certain types of election race appeared to confer significant disadvantages. The full analysis is attached as Attachment A to the agenda report.

8.       This effect would be remedied by all names on the voting document being in random order. The disadvantage of random order is that it creates some friction for voters. Friction is anything that makes the voting experience harder. If names are ordered randomly then the voter has to undertake additional effort to identify the voter’s preferred candidates. This works against the overall goal of increasing voter turnout.

9.       Nevertheless, since the evidence is clear that in some cases alphabetical order creates a disadvantage, staff recommend that the order of names on Auckland Council voting documents for 2025 be random order.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback to the Governing Body on whether candidate names on voting documents should be in random order given the statistical evidence that being lower on the list in certain types of election race appears to confer significant disadvantages.

 

Horopaki

Context

Options available

10.     Clause 31 of The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 states:

(1)     The names under which each candidate is seeking election may be arranged on the voting document in alphabetical order of surname, pseudo-random order, or random order.

(2)     Before the electoral officer gives further public notice under section 65(1) of the Act, a local authority may determine, by a resolution, which order, as set out in subclause (1), the candidates' names are to be arranged on the voting document.

(3)     If there is no applicable resolution, the candidates' names must be arranged in alphabetical order of surname.

(4)     If a local authority has determined that pseudo-random order is to be used, the electoral officer must state, in the notice given under section 65(1) of the Act, the date, time, and place at which the order of the candidates' names will be arranged and any person is entitled to attend.

(5)     In this regulation,—

pseudo-random order means an arrangement where —

(a) the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly; and

(b) all voting documents use that order

random order means an arrangement where the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly or nearly randomly for each voting document by, for example, the process used to print each voting document.

Previous elections

11.     In 2013, the council resolved to use alphabetical order of names, a consideration being an additional cost of $100,000 if the council chose the random order. From 2016 there has been no additional cost to use random order, due to changes in printing technology, however the council has chosen to use alphabetical order of names in past elections on the basis that statistical research did not indicate a compelling case to change to random order. 

12.     For the 2022 elections the following table outlines decisions of those regional and city councils whose data was available, with random order being used by 19 out of the 22 councils other than Auckland:

Auckland Council

Alphabetical

Bay Of Plenty Regional Council

Random

Environment Southland Regional Council

Random

Hawke's Bay Regional Council

Random

Manawatū-Whanganui Regional Council

Random

Northland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Otago Regional Council

Random

Southland Regional Council

Random

Taranaki Regional Council

Alphabetical

Waikato Regional Council

Random

West Coast Regional Council

Alphabetical

Christchurch City Council

Random

Dunedin City Council

Random

Hamilton City Council

Random

Hutt City Council

Random

Invercargill City Council

Random

Napier City Council

Random

Nelson City Council

Random

Palmerston North City Council

Random

Porirua City Council

Random

Tauranga City Council (2024)

Random

Upper Hutt City Council

Random

Wellington City Council

Random

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options for 2025

Pseudo-random order and true random order

13.     Random order printing removes name order bias, whereas the pseudo-random order of names simply substitutes a different order for an alphabetical order. For example, any first-name bias will transfer to the name at the top of the pseudo-random list. The only effective alternative to alphabetical order is true random order, which means the order on every voting document is different.

14.     A disadvantage to both the random printing options is that they create friction for the voter. Friction is anything that makes the voting experience harder. If names are ordered randomly then the voter has to undertake additional effort to identify the voter’s preferred candidates. This works against the overall goal of increasing voter turnout if the friction deters any voters.

Alphabetical order

15.     The advantage of the alphabetical order printing is that it is familiar, easier to use and to understand. When a large number of candidates compete for a position it is easier for a voter to find the candidate the voter wishes to support if names are listed alphabetically.

16.     It is also easier for a voter if the order of names on the voting documents follows the order of names in the directory of candidate profile statements accompanying the voting document. The directory is listed in alphabetical order. It is not possible to print it in such a way that each copy aligns with the random order of names on the accompanying voting documents.

17.     The disadvantage of alphabetical printing is that there is now evidence from a statistical analysis of council’s previous election results, that where there are a larger number of candidates, being lower on the list in certain types of election race confers significant disadvantages.

 

Analysis of previous election results

18.     An analysis[3] of the council’s election results for 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019 and 2022 is contained in Attachment A to the agenda report.

19.     Again, the analysis found no compelling evidence that candidates who were listed first were more likely to be elected in the last five Auckland Council elections.

20.     This time the analysis introduced consideration of positions other than first, and also of ‘election race length’ (for example, how many candidates were in each local board or ward race) and also added linear interpolation modelling.

21.     This extended analysis has found that comparing actual votes received proportional to the expected share, being lower on the list in certain types of election race appeared to confer significant disadvantages.

Conclusion

22.     A decision about the order of names on voting documents is made by resolution of the council under clause 31 of the Local Electoral Regulations 2001. Such regulations are provided for in section 139 of the Local Electoral Act 2001.

23.     Section 4 of the Local Electoral Act 2001 requires local authorities, when making decisions under the Act, to take into account the principles set out in section 4. These principles are:

(1)    The principles that this Act is designed to implement are the following:

(aa)   representative and substantial electoral participation in local elections and polls:

(a)     fair and effective representation for individuals and communities:

(b)     all qualified persons have a reasonable and equal opportunity to—

(i)     cast an informed vote:

(ii)    nominate 1 or more candidates:

(iii)   accept nomination as a candidate:

(c)     public confidence in, and public understanding of, local electoral processes through—

(i)      the provision of a regular election cycle:

(ii)      the provision of elections that are managed independently from the elected body:

(iii)     protection of the freedom of choice of voters and the secrecy of the vote:

(iv)    the provision of transparent electoral systems and voting methods and the adoption of procedures that produce certainty in electoral outcomes:

(v)     the provision of impartial mechanisms for resolving disputed elections and polls.

24.     The principles include substantial participation in the elections and public confidence in electoral processes. They also include a principle that all qualified persons have a reasonable and equal opportunity to accept nomination as a candidate. This implies a candidate should not be disadvantaged by virtue of their surname.

25.     While alphabetical ordering of names facilitates participation (supporting one of these principles), there is now evidence that this could disadvantage some candidates if they appear lower on the candidate list (compromising the principle that all persons have an equal opportunity to stand).

26.     In terms of public confidence, for the 2022 elections a website[4] criticised the council’s decision to use alphabetical order. This is the only known criticism however the council needs to be seen to be making this decision in a robust manner.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on the wider group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     Feedback from local boards will be reported to the Governing Body when it is asked to determine the matter by resolution.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     The order of names on voting documents does not specifically impact on the Māori community. It is noted that candidates can provide their profile statements both in English and Māori and that such profile statements are contained in the candidate profile booklet in alphabetic order.  Having voting documents in alphabetic order makes it easier for any voter to match the candidate in the profile booklet.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     There is no additional cost to the printing of voting documents if names are ordered using the random method.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     Given the widespread adoption of random order of names on voting documents among regional and city councils, if names are ordered alphabetically there is the risk of public criticism of the council’s decision.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     The feedback from the local board will be reported to the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo - Analysis of order of candidate names on election outcomes

149

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor, Governance Services

Authorisers

Rose Leonard – General Manager Governance Services

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 













Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Options for voting methods in local elections

File No.: CP2024/06090

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback on a range of voting method options following the Governing Body’s 27 April 2023 decision asking staff to investigate options of postal, booth or a combination voting method for the 2025 elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Postal voting is the current voting method for Auckland Council elections.

3.       Following the review of the 2022 elections, several short and long-term issues were identified. These include:

·    some eligible voters not receiving voting documents

·    few special voting centres

·    general consequences of a declining postal service

·    general decline in voter turnout.

4.       In March 2023 local boards were asked for their feedback on whether council should move from a ‘postal only’ voting method to a ‘combination’ (postal and booth) voting method. (Attachment A to the agenda report)

·    14 supported combination voting (postal, with booth on election day).

·    One supported postal and online voting.

·    One supported online voting, and booth voting on election day.

·    One supported retaining postal only.

·    Four did not provide feedback on this issue.

5.       In April 2023 the Governing Body supported staff to investigate options of postal, booth or a combination method of voting for the 2025 election. The council can change its voting method through resolution.

6.       Local boards are being consulted on this topic again, as the option for a booth only voting method is now also under consideration.

7.       Staff are investing the feasibility of five options:

·    Option One - postal voting with limited special voting centres (status quo)

·    Option Two - postal voting with more special voting centres (status quo plus)

·    Option Three - booth voting

·    Option Four - combination voting (postal, with booth on election day only)

·    Option Five - combination voting (booth and postal).

8.       The management of postal voting is relatively straightforward. The short-term issues identified at the 2022 election can be remedied through the addition of more special voting centres on election day (status quo plus – option two).

9.       The management of booth voting is more complex and comes with risks and higher costs. The organisation will need to build capacity to manage a booth voting election with up to 630 voting places, and to hire and train up to 3000 temporary staff.

10.     Booth voting has not been used in local elections since 1992 and the current booth voting regulations have not been tested since that time. No recent policy work has been done to determine if any amendments to the regulations are necessary to ensure their workability in the modern context. The Department of Internal Affairs has stated it may be challenging for policy work to be completed and ready for the 2025 local elections.

11.     A combination method will be costly (estimated between $10.7-$17.1 million) with the separate costs for postal and booth operations. Additionally, the close of voting on election day for postal is 12 noon, and 7pm for booth. This could lead to the confusion and frustration of voters.

12.     Staff recommend that the postal voting method should be retained, with an increase of special voting centres to avoid queues on election day (status quo plus – option two).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whakarite / provide feedback on their preferred voting method provided in this report and on the staff recommendation for the status quo plus option.

Horopaki

Context

13.     Auckland Council appoints an Electoral Officer to conduct its elections for mayor, councillors and local board members. The Electoral Officer also conducts the elections for five licensing trusts. 

14.     The Chief Executive is responsible to the council for “facilitating and fostering representative and substantial elector participation in elections and polls held under the Local Electoral Act 2001”.  For this reason, a small team of seconded, fixed term and sometimes volunteer staff work alongside the Electoral Officer to ensure all eligible voters are well informed and motivated to vote and that voters have a diverse range of candidates to choose from.

15.     The Governing Body can make decisions about specified matters relating to elections, including the voting method.

16.     The Local Electoral Act 2001 allows a council, through resolution, to change the voting method of its elections. The authorised methods are:

·    postal voting (current method)

·    booth voting

·    a combination method.

17.     Attachment B to the agenda report provides details of the different methods of voting. Attachment C to the agenda report provides three flow charts outlining how voters would interact with each of the three distinct voting processes (postal, booth and combination) and how each process interacts with the others.

18.     Online voting is not an option within the Local Electoral Act 2001. The Governing Body has not previously considered a change from postal voting.

19.     Voter turnout has declined from 59 per cent at the first Auckland City Council postal method election (1986), down to 35.5 per cent at the 2022 Auckland Council election.  Although Auckland Council’s result was up 0.3 per cent from the 2019 election it still does not compare favourably with other parts of New Zealand. The average voter turnout at the 2022 elections across local governments was 42 per cent.

20.     An evaluation of the Auckland Council 2022 elections was provided to the Governing Body in April 2023 (Attachment D to the agenda report). This review outlined several short and long-term issues with the postal voting method from Auckland voters including:

·    some voters not receiving voting documents. This is largely because the Electoral Commission have difficulties getting eligible voters to enrol or update their enrolment information when they shift to another residential location. This information needs to be up to date so that eligible voters can receive their voting pack in the mail.

·    the need to travel far for a special voting centre

·    having to queuing at a special voting centre on election day

·    the challenge of voting paper security.

21.     Long-term issues were also identified, including:

·    the declining and costly postal service

·    the general decline in voter turnout.

22.     One of the options in the 2022 evaluation is to consider moving from postal voting to a combination method (postal and booth) at the 2025 election, whereby booths are staffed on election day and do not close until 7pm. Postal voting would be available as has been past practice, closing at 12 noon on election day. Including this option, staff are investigating the feasibility of five options:

·    Option One - postal voting only (status quo)

·    Option Two - postal voting with more special voting centres (‘status quo plus’)

·    Option Three - booth voting only

·    Option Four - combination voting (postal, with booth on election day only)

·    Option Five - combination voting (booth and postal).

23.     The Department of Internal Affairs (DIA), in their 2023 Briefing to the Incoming Minister, has signalled changes to current voting method regulations. They describe the need to modernise a system that ‘relies heavily on traditional postal services and has not kept up with many improvements to parliamentary election processes.’ DIA believe these changes might happen in time for the 2028 elections.

24.     This report provides a staff recommendation that responds to the short-term issues described above and outlines current risks with options that respond to the long-term issues.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Option One – Status quo – postal voting with limited special voting centres

25.     Postal voting is used in every council in New Zealand and is widely supported by Electoral Officers across local governments who are a mixture of both independent and council staff.  It is relatively cost effective, and a system known to those who are involved so there is a high probability of achieving a clear and defensible election result.

26.     It does have some problems however which are contained in Attachment D to the agenda report and noted above which has led to improvements being made in recent years such as the provision of special voting centres.

27.     To overcome people not receiving their voting papers, special voting centres have been used to ensure eligible voters can cast a vote during the electoral period. 

28.     At the 2022 election the eight special voting centres had lines out the door, with some voters queuing on the last hours of the last day.

29.     New Zealand Post have previously advised that postage costs will rise in the order of 30 per cent per annum meaning that the estimate of the 2025 election costs of postage is likely to be around 100 per cent more than the 2022 elections, with mailer printing set to increase by 25 per cent over the same period.

Option Two – Status quo plus – postal voting with more special voting centres

30.     Despite its drawbacks, postal voting is a straightforward and relatively cost-effective method for Auckland Council to administer and has a high likelihood of a clear and defensible election result, compared to booth only voting. A postal voting election, with increased special voting centres would provide a short-term response to some of the issues from the 2022 election. An increase in the number of special voting places (minimum one per local board area) will reduce travel and wait times and ensure those who do not receive or lose their voting documents can easily vote.

Option Three - Booth voting

31.     The main perceived benefit to Auckland Council running booth voting for the next election is that it would be similar to Parliamentary elections which is something that voters are very used to and attracts nationwide media coverage.  Booth voting also would overcome the issue of a declining postal service and address perceptions about postal ballots being stolen and/or misused.

32.     There are some drawbacks however:

·    Booth voting has no provision for voters outside of Auckland. Currently, the Local Electoral Regulations 2001 do not give voters who are overseas and outside of Auckland voters an option to return their vote electronically. DIA has stated that they have started early policy work to allow the return of votes electronically for overseas voters but if any changes are made, they may not be ready for the 2025 local elections.

·    To be comparable to a booth voting experience provided by the Electoral Commission for Parliamentary elections, up to 3000 temporary staff would need to be hired and up to 630 voting places would need to be managed over the voting period. This resource has not been budgeted for. The capacity and capability of the organisation to manage this large undertaking is a risk. The financial and reputational cost to re-run a booth voting election is extremely high.

·    Auckland Council and Independent Election Services (our contracted service provider) have not run a booth voting election before.

·    Voter turnout might be impacted. Dale Ofsoske, the Auckland Council Electoral Officer, suggests there could be up to a 10 per cent decrease in voter turnout. This is based on the last booth voting election undertaken by a local authority in New Zealand, where Hutt City Council adopted booth voting for their 1992 election and achieved a 26 per cent turnout compared to the previous postal voting election where a 45 per cent turnout was achieved.  Although there may be other circumstances relating to that case, it is worth bearing in mind that a shift of this nature has risks.

·    Time taken to cast a vote is not conducive to booth voting.  Voters in a general election have to make only two choices; one for an electorate vote and one party vote. This is in contrast to the number of choices for an Auckland local election where a mayor, councillor, up to nine local board members and five licensing trusts are decided. The regulations state that candidate profiles must be provided when a voting document is issued. The time it will take for voters to review candidate profiles and make their decision could cause long wait times at polling places. This was evidenced at special voting places in 2022.

Options Four and Five - Combination postal and booth voting

33.     The benefits of a combination method, of postal and booth voting, are that these options overcome the known problems of postal and booth voting as follows:

·    a combination voting method provides a process (postal voting) for overseas and outside of Auckland voters with a way to return their votes, which booth voting only does not.

·    a combination voting method, reduces reliance on and responds to the declining postal service, while giving voters more options for casting and returning their votes.

34.     There are additional risks however:

·    The risk with a combination of voting methods is the potential for widespread confusion and frustration. Conveying to voters a combination method, and the different closing times of postal and booth voting, 12 noon and 7pm, respectively, is not straightforward. This could also impact on a later release of election results.

·    Because turnout trends for election methods are mixed, the potential level of confusion could decrease turnout.

·    Managing and running two discrete election method processes (plus special voting) is a capability and capacity risk. Council and independent election providers in New Zealand do not have sufficient experience to run a booth voting election.

·    If systems fail and an election result is not clear, the financial and reputational cost to re-run an election is high (above $10million).

·    The cost of running the postal voting method will have increased by approx. $2.6 million since 2022 by the time council runs the 2025 election, the addition of a booth voting method in addition to postal will further increase costs. This is covered further in the financial analysis section.

Staff recommendation

35.     Staff recommend retaining the postal voting method with an increase in special voting centres (the ‘status quo plus’ option).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

36.     This report discusses booth voting. The climate impact of people travelling to a booth is likely to be mixed, depending on where they are located.

37.     Voting documents for postal and booth method elections rely on the use of paper. A more climate friendly option would be online voting. However, online voting is currently not an authorised voting method in the legislation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.     A decision about the voting method affects how voters elect the mayor, councillors and local board members. It does not have major impacts on the council group.

39.     In some options, libraries and volunteer staff may be engaged. Libraries have been consulted and are able to help. Volunteer staff will be engaged if necessary.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

40.     In March 2023 local boards were asked for their feedback on whether council should move from a ‘postal only’ voting method to a ‘combination’ (postal and booth) voting method.

·    14 supported combination voting (postal, with booth on election day).

·    One supported postal and online voting.

·    One supported online voting, and booth voting on election day.

·    One supported retaining postal only.

·    Four did not provide feedback on this issue.

41.     Local communities have not been consulted regarding voting methods.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

42.     Demographic data shows that turnout for electors of Māori descent was lower than the average turnout. Further analysis conducted by RIMU about who voted in the 2022 local elections suggested that a range of interrelated factors may be contributing to these discrepancies, including:

·    differences in the perceived relevance of local government to the everyday life of different communities

·    differences in family and work commitments and an ability to pay attention to local politics in light of other life priorities

·    the complexity of the local government system and voting process, along with differences in knowledge about local government across communities in Auckland

·    for some communities, a lack of identification with and ability to see one’s identity reflected in the local governance system

·    a distrust of and disengagement from the local government system, particularly amongst Māori

·    the existence of a social norm of non-voting in some families, neighbourhoods and communities.

43.     The impact of a different voting method on Māori voter turnout is not known and difficult to estimate.  This is also true for non-Māori voter turnout.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

44.     Of the options considered, the estimated financial implications run between $10,060,390 and $19,849,574.  Only options One and Two have sufficient budget provided for in the Long-term Plan.  Any other option would require additional funding to be made available by making further trade-offs in another budgetary allocation.

45.     The costs below are estimates. This is especially true for options which include booth voting as not all costs are known.

Option

Description

Cost (estimate)

Option One - Postal voting only (Status quo)

Same as 2022, with 8 special voting centres

$10,060,390

Option Two - Postal voting, plus more special voting centres (Status quo plus)

Same as 2022, with a minimum of one special voting centre per LB

$10,160,390

Option Three - Booth only

20 places per LB, 7 days

$11,377,653

30 places per LB, 7 days

$13,714,734

20 places per LB, 14 days (same voting period as Parliamentary elections)

$15,467,546

30 places per LB, 14 days

$19,849,574

Option Four - Combination: Postal voting, with booth voting on election day

Postal, with 20 places per LB on election day

$10,673,874

Option Five - Combination: Booth and Postal voting

30 places per LB, 7 days

$17,071,634

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

46.     Staff have taken the short-term issues from the findings of the 2022 election to provide a recommendation to maintain postal voting, with more special voting centres (status quo plus).

47.     In consideration of the declining postal service and voter turnout, staff will continue to work with DIA, the Electoral Commission, and other entities to inform policy work for any potential changes for the 2028 elections.

48.     The analysis in the body of this report includes information on the risks of each option and Attachment E to the agenda report describes these in more detail. This analysis shows that Option Two ‘status quo plus’ has the least risks. The risks noted include:

·    voter fraud

·    voter intimidation

·    technical issues

·    long queues and voter suppression

·    misinformation and disinformation

·    security concerns

·    accessibility issues

·    logistical challenges

·    communication of results

·    postal service

·    fit for purpose.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

49.     Local Board feedback will be provided to the Governing Body in June 2024 where a decision on the voting method for the 2025 local elections will be sought.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2022 local board feedback

169

b

Types of voting methods

197

c

Voting method flow charts

201

d

Evaluation of 2022 election method

205

e

Risk analysis

225

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Liam Davies - Graduate

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Rose Leonard - Manager Governance Services

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 





























Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 




Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 





Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 




















Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 





Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Upper Harbour Local Board views on the Fast-track Approvals Bill

File No.: CP2024/05483

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Upper Harbour Local Board’s feedback on the proposed Fast-track Approvals Bill made under urgent decision on 11 April 2024 as set out in Attachment B of the agenda report. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The government introduced the Fast-track Approvals Bill under urgency on 7 March 2024. The government intends to facilitate infrastructure and major projects with significant regional or national benefits. The Bill is with the Environment Select Committee. Submissions closed on 19 April 2024.

3.       In December 2023, the government repealed all aspects of the previous government’s resource management legislation except the fast-track consenting regime in the Natural and Built Environment Act 2023 (NBEA). This Bill will repeal that fast-track consenting regime and replace it with a new regime in a standalone act that is broader, enabling approvals ordinarily considered in other legislation, plus consents and notices of requirement under the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA). A broad range of activities will have access to the fast-track process, including infrastructure, renewable energy, housing and mining.

4.       Council staff have prepared a draft submission for consideration of the Planning, Environment and Parks Committee.

5.       A memo (Attachment A to the agenda report) was provided to local boards that sets out initial areas of focus that informed the council’s submission including:

·   Natural justice and loss of local voice: no transparency regarding listed projects to be fast-tracked; Auckland’s prohibited activity rules can be set aside; little involvement for local authorities on significant applications; peri-urban projects may be enabled contrary to council’s Future Development Strategy, and impact on Local Government Act budgeting and infrastructure financing and growth decisions.

·   Risk of unplanned development reliant on council infrastructure for which there is no financing with consequential financial and level of service impacts with governance decisions required.

·   Poor environmental outcomes: proposal to enable multiple approval types under standalone legislation is unsupported by evidence / analysis and relevant statutory considerations are secondary to the Bill’s sole fast-tracking project facilitation purpose. The Bill is likely to enable significant negative impacts on environmental outcomes with little public or independent oversight and accountability.

·   Range of matters subject to further analysis by the council’s submission project team.

6.       The deadline for local board view’s to be incorporated in the Auckland Council submission was 12 April 2024 which did not allow adequate time for the item to be bought to a business meeting, therefore the feedback was approved using the following urgent decision process:

 

16

Arrangements for making urgent decisions

 

The Local Area Manager, Lesley Jenkins, and the Senior Local Board Advisor, Heather Skinner, were in attendance to support the item.

 

Resolution number UH/2022/137

MOVED by Member C Blair, seconded by Member K Parker: 

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      delegate authority to the chairperson and deputy chairperson, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board, if the local board is unable to meet.

b)      confirm that the Local Area Manager, chairperson, and deputy chairperson (or any person/s acting in these roles) will authorise the use of the local board’s urgent decision mechanism by approving the request for an urgent decision in writing.

c)      note that all urgent decisions made, including written advice which supported these decisions, will be included on the agenda of the next ordinary meeting of the local board.

 

CARRIED

7.       The supporting information provided to support the Upper Harbour Local Board’s formal feedback process included Auckland Council’s MEMO – AC Submission on the Fast-track Approvals Bill (Attachment A to the agenda report) and the Local Board Members Briefing: CSG on Fast Track Consenting & Reallocation of non- regulatory activities, that was held on 25 March 2024.

8.       A copy of the Upper Harbour Local Board formal feedback, submitted on 11 April 2024, is available under Attachment B to the agenda report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Upper Harbour Local Board’s feedback on the proposed Fast-track Approvals Bill made under urgent decision on 11 April 2024 as set out in Attachment B of the agenda report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

MEMO – AC Submission on the Fast-track Approvals Bill

233

b

Urgent Decision Upper Harbour Local Board feedback on Fast-track Approvals Bill

245

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Robert Marshall - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 












Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 



Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Hōtaka Kaupapa / Governance forward work calendar

File No.: CP2024/03119

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the updated Hōtaka Kaupapa / governance forward work calendar for May 2024 – July 2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa / governance forward work calendar for the Upper Harbour Local Board is in Attachment A to the agenda report. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings, and distributed to council staff.

3.       The Hōtaka Kaupapa / governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·     ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·     clarifying what advice is expected and when

·     clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Upper Harbour Local Board Hōtaka Kaupapa / governance forward work calendar for May 2024 – July 2024 (refer to attachment A to the agenda report).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hōtaka Kaupapa / governance forward work calendar for May 2024 – July 2024.

249

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Workshop records

File No.: CP2024/03120

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the records of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 4,11 and 18 April 2024 and 2 May 2024. A copy of the workshop records is attached (refer to attachments A, B,C and D to the agenda report).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the records of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 4, 11 and 18 April 2024 and 2 May 2024 (refer to attachments A, B,C and D to the agenda report).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board - record of workshop 4 April 2024.

253

b

Upper Harbour Local Board - record of workshop 11 April 2024.

255

c

Upper Harbour Local Board - record of workshop 18 April 2024.

259

d

Upper Harbour Local Board - record of workshop 2 May 2024.

261

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 



Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 




Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 



Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 




Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Auckland Transport - West Hub Bulletin

File No.: CP2024/03121

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Auckland Transport West Hub Bulletin for April 2024.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Transport West Hub Bulletin for April 2024 for the Upper Harbour Local Board is in Attachment A of the agenda report.

3.       The Auckland Transport West Hub Bulletin is a monthly update to keep the local board informed about what is happening in the local board area during the previous month and about plans in the future. It includes:

·     information about current projects being undertaken in the local board area.

·     a list of projects that are being consulted on.

·     other transport related information about the local board area.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the Auckland Transport West Hub Bulletin for April 2024 (Attachment A to the agenda report).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport West Hub Bulletin - April 2024.

267

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 


























Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Local Board Members' Reports - May 2024

File No.: CP2024/03122

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for members to update the Upper Harbour Local Board on matters they have been involved in over the last month.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for members of the Upper Harbour Local Board to provide a report on their activities for the month.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      whiwhi / receive the verbal and written local board members reports.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Upper Harbour Local Board

a)      whakaae / agree to exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Upper Harbour Local Board feedback on Pools and Leisure Contract Model

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report relates to ongoing contract negotiations and should remain confidential until August, to ensure the awarding of contracts has been completed prior

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Auckland North Community and Development presentation.                                                  Page 301

Item 8.2      Attachment a    Fencing of the off-leash dog area at Sanders Reserve presentation.                                   Page 309

Item 8.4      Attachment a    Greenhithe Community Trust presentation.  Page 319


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 









Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 










Upper Harbour Local Board

23 May 2024

 

 






















[1] See, for example, “How Much is Enough? The Ballot Order Effect and the Use of Social Science Research in Election Law Disputes”, R. Michael Alvarez and Betsy Sinclair, https://web.archive.org/web/20100615182629id_/http://home.uchicago.edu/~betsy/papers/eljalvarez.pdf

[2] In this analysis a ‘race’ refers to an election in a particular ward or local board in a particular year.

[3] By Ross Wilson in the RIMU Research and Evaluation Unit in 2023. It is noted that the RIMU research did not (and could not) separate out the effects of alphabetical order on the ballot slip, from the effects of alphabetical ordering of the directory of candidate profile statements. The candidate booklet cannot be randomised.

[4] https://thefacts.nz/all/alpha-bias-surnames-in-the-top-3-won-50-of-elections/